https://paloaltoonline.com/square/print/2020/03/24/council-abandons-plan-for-business-tax-as-local-economy-plunges


Town Square

Council abandons plan for business tax as local economy plunges

Original post made on Mar 24, 2020

It took years for Palo Alto to prepare a business tax that city leaders were planning to place on the November ballot. And just one surreal week to shut the effort down.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Tuesday, March 24, 2020, 9:08 AM

Comments

2 people like this
Posted by Independent
a resident of Esther Clark Park
on Mar 24, 2020 at 3:37 pm

No new taxes that roll on down to residents and consumers.

And no to closing Churchill Avenue and sending 7000 more cars onto Embarcadero Avenue!


4 people like this
Posted by Anon
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 25, 2020 at 11:07 am

Posted by Independent, a resident of Esther Clark Park

>> No new taxes that roll on down to residents and consumers.

A good tax will not harm residents or local consumers. A good tax will have exclusions that will protect local small business proprietors.


6 people like this
Posted by Novelera
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 25, 2020 at 2:21 pm

City Council was holding their noses about the business tax even when they finally decided to put it on the ballot. And now they have the perfect excuse to keep letting businesses in Palo Alto off the hook for another TWO years. And this is considering that every municipality on the Peninsula has a business tax, except Palo Alto.


3 people like this
Posted by DTNResident
a resident of Downtown North
on Mar 25, 2020 at 4:42 pm

We're closing our downtown Palo Alto facility and moving to a lower tax state at the end of the year when our lease is up. The business tax was the last straw and the decision has already been made. The lower tax states seem to be running just fine without demanding more and more from the business owners.

"Improving" a business registry that no one uses or has any need for makes about as much sense as trying to devote people to "improve" 56K baud modems. I can only imagine what the "improvements" are going to cost me when the whole thing should be shut down and the money refunded. But nope, you're going to "improve" it. That tells me where your head is and that my decision to vacate is the right one.

The tenants pay the property taxes, not the owners of the buildings. I pay $40,000 per year plus $800 per employee to park on the street. Apparently that wasn't enough, so soon I'll be paying $0 and you can try to squeeze someone else for more in two years. You can walk down University Ave. and see all of the closed businesses before this virus hit. It's about to get 10x worse. Adios and good luck.


4 people like this
Posted by Anon
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 26, 2020 at 10:57 am

Posted by DTNResident, a resident of Downtown North

>> We're closing our downtown Palo Alto facility and moving to a lower tax state at the end of the year when our lease is up. The business tax was the last straw and the decision has already been made. The lower tax states seem to be running just fine without demanding more and more from the business owners.

Without seeing your tax returns, we have no way of knowing why or how a proposed business tax pushed you out of the state. IOW, your statement is impossible to either verify, or, understand even if true.

How about you post some actual numbers, and, specifics about how your costs break down.

The high cost of small-office-space rentals is much more of a problem for most small service providers than City of Palo Alto taxes. Why are some huge employers staying here when they could move some or most of their operations elsewhere to a lower rent -- business AND residential -- area. e.g. Tracy.