Town Square

Post a New Topic

Blowing in insulation - which companies do it best?

Original post made by Susan Strain, College Terrace, on Jan 24, 2008

I rent an old cottage and propose to pay higher rent to be warm in the winter (and not too hot in the summer). Some companies (Eagle Shield, Bay Valley) won't give you an estimate if you aren't the landlord, so I'm not interested in them. Of the other companies, has anyone had a good or bad experience with them? Was the insulation worth the money? Did they leave the ceiling, etc., in paintable condition, or did you have to spackle? Were there any unexpected drawbacks?

Comments (7)

Like this comment
Posted by janette
a resident of College Terrace
on Jan 25, 2008 at 6:02 am

I had blown in attic insulation put in many years ago, the company no longer exists. But they dragged the hose thru the trapdoor into the attic, no holes in the ceiling were necessary.

Now I would ask, is it better to have blown in insulation on the attic floor, or batts of insulation on the inside of the attic roof. The latter might help avoid heat buildup in the summer.

Walls, I can't say.


Like this comment
Posted by RS
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jan 25, 2008 at 10:20 am

Walls can be blown in, its more expensive, they have to drill 2 ~1 inch holes every 16 inches in the wall. So you have to plan on a paint job after the work is done. When I remodeled my barret and hilp house, there was no wall insulation. Since I opened up the walls, I could put in batts.

My house also used to have metal casement single pane windows. There are a lot of these in P.A. These are about the worst windows to have in terms of heat transfer.

These smaller houses were built cheaply when energy was cheap. There are a bunch of opportunities to make them more energy efficient while not sacrificing personal comfort.




Like this comment
Posted by Walter_E_Wallis
a resident of Midtown
on Jan 25, 2008 at 12:50 pm

Do the ceiling, then replace fenestration. Then elect a leader who will drill Anwar and offshore, and build nuclear power plants.


Like this comment
Posted by RS
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jan 25, 2008 at 4:03 pm

"Now I would ask, is it better to have blown in insulation on the attic floor, or batts of insulation on the inside of the attic roof."

you can also do batts on the attic floor which is the easiest to self install. If you put the insulation against the roof the problem is with the roofing materials. If your roofing materials use the attic space air to dry out after a storm, you dont want materials trapping moisture against the roofing materials.

Another method to avoid summer heat build up is an attic exhaust fan, or lighter colored roofing materials that will reflect some heat.


Like this comment
Posted by Walter_E_Wallis
a resident of Midtown
on Jan 26, 2008 at 3:20 am

RS is correct. The concerns lately about mold make under roof ventilation a concern.


Like this comment
Posted by RS
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jan 28, 2008 at 9:49 am

"Now I would ask, is it better to have blown in insulation on the attic floor, or batts of insulation on the inside of the attic roof."

oh something else I missed, it you were to put the on the attic roof instead of the attic floor, you would end up paying to heat an unused space as the heat from the home will still leak into the attic from below.


Like this comment
Posted by ginni
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 11, 2009 at 12:55 pm

I own an older Barret and Hilp home and have been experiening odd floor problems with moisture pushing the oak flooring upwards. Has anyone else experienced this problem?


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

I AM THE GOD OF HELL FIRE AND I BRING YOU
By Laura Stec | 29 comments | 1,596 views

Are We Really Up To This?
By Aldis Petriceks | 1 comment | 1,020 views

Couples: Initiators and Implementors
By Chandrama Anderson | 0 comments | 759 views

Nobu Palo Alto eyes next-door expansion
By Elena Kadvany | 0 comments | 586 views

Joe Simitian talk: Listening to Trump's America: Bridging the Divide
By Douglas Moran | 9 comments | 570 views