Town Square

Post a New Topic

Silicon Valley stinks: The science and mystery behind the rare corpse flower bloom

Original post made on Jul 30, 2022

A giant endangered flower that smells like rotting flesh bloomed for the first time at San Jose State this week. Here's a glimpse (and a whiff) of all the excitement.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Saturday, July 30, 2022, 8:55 AM

Comments (5)

Posted by Bruce Younger
a resident of Downtown North
on Jul 30, 2022 at 9:42 am

Bruce Younger is a registered user.

Seriously...outside of erudite university botanists, who would want to have a tree that smells like rotting flesh on their residential property?

This unique tree is a native of Sumatra and belongs in its native habitat.

And as far as it becoming extinct, who cares?


Posted by Anita Lewis
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jul 30, 2022 at 2:26 pm

Anita Lewis is a registered user.

I feel the same way about ginko trees.

Ginko trees like Fuji Apple trees and marijuana plants are male/female gender and while the female Fuji Apple trees and female cannabis plants bear useful fruit, the female ginko trees bear stinky fruit and soil the sidewalks.


Posted by vmshadle
a resident of Meadow Park
on Aug 1, 2022 at 10:52 am

vmshadle is a registered user.

Please don't tell me that I'm the only one left who appreciates the wonders of other species for their own sakes. Viewing other living organisms and their places in larger ecosystems merely through the lens of our own convenience is an unbelievably impoverished perspective.

The corpse flower evolved as it did because it plays a role in its ecosystem. Just because we can't appreciate it from where we live doesn't mean extinction wouldn't be highly problematic for its own environment.


Posted by Forrest Blocker
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Aug 1, 2022 at 11:41 am

Forrest Blocker is a registered user.

@vmshadle
Species extinction is a part of nature as exemplified in Darwin's works.

"The corpse flower evolved as it did because it plays a role in its ecosystem. Just because we can't appreciate it from where we live doesn't mean extinction wouldn't be highly problematic for its own environment."

What goes on in Sumatra is of ecological insignificance to Palo Alto.

There are many now-extinct species that are hardly missed by the general population.

Let's focus on eradicating global epidemics rather than wasting time on trees that smell like dead bodies.

Would you plant one of these trees in your backyard?

I seriously doubt it.


Posted by Eric Fischer
a resident of Stanford
on Aug 1, 2022 at 5:23 pm

Eric Fischer is a registered user.

When I was a kid I had some Venus Fly Trap plants.

I used to capture flies to feed them or drop a small piece of hamburger inside their flowers.

Long story short...I overfed them with hamburger meat and they eventually died.

Moral of the story...a vegan diet is healthier and I probably could have gotten by feeding them tofu.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Email:


Post a comment

Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

Stay informed.

Get the day's top headlines from Palo Alto Online sent to your inbox in the Express newsletter.

The West Coast's viral spiral croissant maker is coming to Palo Alto
By The Peninsula Foodist | 1 comment | 5,093 views

Mandates or Markets for Environmental Policy?
By Sherry Listgarten | 8 comments | 3,511 views

Housing Element Update
By Steve Levy | 4 comments | 598 views