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Ibuprofen linked to kidney injury in endurance runners

Original post made on Jul 13, 2017

Endurance runners who take the painkiller ibuprofen during very long runs double their risk of acute kidney injury, a study by researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine and other institutions have found.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Thursday, July 13, 2017, 9:05 AM

Comments (10)

4 people like this
Posted by Running was a sport
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 13, 2017 at 1:24 pm

"Acute kidney injury is common in ultramarathoners -- with or without ibuprofen -- and has been found in 34 to 85 percent of all ultramarathoners,"

Remember when running was a sport? a healthy sport, not an obsession, not a vicious competition.


4 people like this
Posted by Marlene Glez
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Jul 13, 2017 at 1:28 pm

Marlene Glez is a registered user.

Any drug taken before a Sport is cheating does'nt matter if is over the counter...


2 people like this
Posted by Vitamin I
a resident of another community
on Jul 13, 2017 at 1:52 pm

Vitamin I is a healthy part of a balanced ultramarathon.


8 people like this
Posted by R. Winslow
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 13, 2017 at 6:39 pm

>"Acute kidney injury is common in ultramarathoners -- with or without ibuprofen -- and has been found in 34 to 85 percent of all ultramarathoners,"

Remember when running was a sport? a healthy sport, not an obsession, not a vicious competition

This individual knows what he/she is talking about. I used to run 5 miles per day (sometimes 7-9). Anyone who's run considerable distances has noticed blood in their urine from time to time so obviously something is breaking down during the course of this strenuous activity.

Ibuprofen and acetaminophen both have their drawbacks and Vicodin is not a suitable alternative which is why I sometimes relied on some good weed and a cold beer to recover.


1 person likes this
Posted by CrescentParkAnon.
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 13, 2017 at 7:23 pm

This caught my eye quickly.

As a runner ... but not an ultra-marathon runner I have concerns about ibuprofen.
There were times when I started running I would develop pain or inflammation that
would push me away from running for days. I learned never to run when I have pain
because it will usually make it worse.

Then I discovered ibuprofen when I had some knee pains. A tablet of ibuprofen
overnight would vanquish my knee pain and inflammation. I was conservative
about its use because I thought it could be just masking pain and that by
continuing to using it during exercise I might injure myself more. That turned out
not to not be true.

Ibuprofen would stop inflammation and pain and I never developed any injury from
it. It was really a godsend in that it eliminated days that I had to wait to run. I
would be very careful about using any kind of painkiller to be able to run if you
could not run without it or were experiencing pain.

It might have helped that I was never a truly fanatical running, but I could run
a medium speed 5-10 miles all at once and that was great exercise and a wonderful
feeling.

What I am reading here is that certain people under certain circumstances run the
risk of acute kidney injury, most of which resolves itself naturally. Is the problem
ibuprofen or fanatical runners who carelessly push their bodies to the breaking point?
That is not really clear to me from this article.


4 people like this
Posted by Don
a resident of Evergreen Park
on Jul 13, 2017 at 9:28 pm

"It is common for runners to take ibuprofen before, during and after the races to relieve pain and reduce joint swelling"

It's certainly not common for runners to take ibuprofen before an ultra. And it's less common than it used to be for runners to take NSAIDs during a race.

"Acute kidney injury is common in ultramarathoners -- with or without ibuprofen -- and has been found in 34 to 85 percent of all ultramarathoners,"

I'm not sure how the article draws this conclusion. I'm not sure how all (or even most) ultra marathoners would have been tested for AKI?

Also, there's a huge variety in ultra marathons.

The Bay Area and Northern California has ultra marathons happening almost every weekend. I'd venture to guess that acute kidney injury is awfully rare in most of these races. Also, the majority of ultra marathons are 50Ks, which are a not much longer than a marathon.

The study was of runners in a series of relatively extreme multi-day desert races. And it was during the 50 mile stage, after which the runners had already been taxed by multiple days of running in the desert.

Don
Co-owner, ZombieRunner (finisher of 200+ ultras and marathons)


7 people like this
Posted by Former Marathoner
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jul 14, 2017 at 10:04 am

Back when I trained for and ran marathons, I would occasionally have either blood in my urine or coffee-colored urine.

My doctor referred me to a urologist who referred me to a nephrologist.

Turned out it is that constant high-impact jarring caused by pounding the ground for so many miles, that causes blood vessels in the kidneys to break and bleed out into the bladder.

Coffee-colored urine after a run is caused by muscle tissue breaking down, and being an overload of protein on the kidneys-- combined with the blood.


Like this comment
Posted by Don
a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 14, 2017 at 11:06 am

> Coffee-colored urine after a run is caused by muscle tissue breaking down, and being an overload of protein on the kidneys-- combined with the blood.

Extreme dehydration can also cause or contribute to this condition - the walls of the bladder rub together. Drinking plenty of water (but not excessively - hyponatremia is also dangerous), along with maintaining electrolyte levels, is important for long endurance events.


3 people like this
Posted by CrescentParkAnon.
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 14, 2017 at 11:37 am

Don, I'm wondering if you run/ran on concrete/cement?

If so you might want to try the Baylands trails.

I always run on dirt or asphalt trails out there. Once
on a trip east I ran on thick concrete roads in Florida and had
to stop immediately because my whole body was jarred with
every step and it felt like my eyes were bouncing in their
sockets. There is a big difference. I think it is damaging
to run on concrete.


1 person likes this
Posted by timetrip
a resident of another community
on Jul 17, 2017 at 5:53 am

The witch hunt continues. What next -- aspirin?


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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