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Works from major American artists gifted to Stanford

Original post made on Jul 28, 2014

Stanford University's Cantor Arts Center has acquired three significant gifts of American art, securing a solid place in the museum's permanent collection of major 20th century works.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Monday, July 28, 2014, 9:55 AM

Comments (6)

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Posted by Traditional Art Lover
a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Jul 28, 2014 at 10:47 am

I do not consider this art. But it's free and obviously, someone likes it.


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Posted by Anonymous
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 28, 2014 at 11:53 am

Very nice. I look forward to the 2015 exhibits, particularly Diebenkorn's sketchbooks.


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Posted by Dennis
a resident of Downtown North
on Jul 28, 2014 at 12:08 pm

"Warhol is arguably the most influential artist in the last century, museum officials said." - So, a pop-artist and kitsch pusher is more influential than, say, Picasso? Dali? Norman Rockwell? Delaunay, Pollock, O'Keeffe?


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Posted by Dennis
a resident of Downtown North
on Jul 28, 2014 at 12:08 pm

"Warhol is arguably the most influential artist in the last century, museum officials said." - So, a pop-artist and kitsch pusher is more influential than, say, Picasso? Dali? Norman Rockwell? Delaunay, Pollock, O'Keeffe?


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Posted by Que Pasa?
a resident of Greater Miranda
on Jul 28, 2014 at 12:49 pm

Why Stanford, especially in the case of Andy Warhol, who was very much a NYC kind of guy? I can't imagine, as an art historian, that he would want his work given to Stanford rather than NYU, or Cornell, or Columbia.

Lawrence and Diebenkorn are more understandable.

However, as an art historian, I am aware that art, art history, and related subjects have never been a great strength of Stanford's, at least not in the way that engineering, medicine, and business are.

If I had inherited a collection of works by a great artist, Stanford is NOT where I would donate them.


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Posted by neighbor
a resident of another community
on Jul 28, 2014 at 3:15 pm

que pasa Que Pasa?
I find your comments odd. The art in most major general museums is hardly ever limited to local artists. Also when art is donated to a museum, the owners usually have strong reasons for selecting the recipient museum. These may or may not be personal ties, there may be a strong respect for the museum, or any number of reasons for a donation.

A couple of observations:

(1) Stanford's Museum opened with the University and it has a broad collection. Art and art history were a University focus from the founding and part of the Stanford's personal tribute to Leland Jr. (who had art expertise way beyond his years)

Did you know that Cantor now has the largest collection of Rodin sculpture *(200 pieces) outside of Paris? Have you been there to see Cantor's wonderful modern collection or the Asian art? Are you aware of the fabulous Anderson Collection opening in September? You make some very strange Stanford comments.

(2) Andy Warhol pieces are in many many major museums all over the U.S. and Europe. They are hardly limited to New York.

AND, of course there is a comprehensive collection in Warhol's hometown (PITTSBURGH PA) where there are "900 paintings; approximately 100 sculptures; nearly 2,000 works on paper; more than 1,000 published and unique prints; and 4,000 photographs" as noted on their website.


Paul Gaugin, who was very much a Tahiti "kind of guy" and spent a lot of time in Provence, has works all over the world too.

Most general museums aim for a collection with breadth.


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