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On Whooping Cough

Original post made by mom, Greenmeadow, on Nov 11, 2010

Found a study published by the Royal Society, the prestigious U.K. based science group, saying the whooping cough outbreak is being caused by a mutated bacteria.

According to the Society, the widely used aP vaccination makes the "host", i.e. our children, more susceptible to the mutated bacteria.

How nice. Web Link

Cheers!

Comments (1)

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Posted by a dad
a resident of Barron Park
on Nov 14, 2010 at 4:31 pm

Re: "Found a study published by the Royal Society, the prestigious U.K. based science group, saying the whooping cough outbreak is being caused by a mutated bacteria."

No, they did not say that the current whooping cough outbreak is being caused by a mutated bacteria.
Nor did they suggest, in any way, that anyone should avoid the current pertussis vaccine.

Quoting the paper, which is based on an experiment on mice:

>>> Specifically, we show that the effect of aP vaccination [[ed: for B. pertussis]] on B. parapertussis infection varied temporally—aP vaccination did not affect B. parapertussis lung CFU [[ed: Colony Formation Units]] on day 3 p.i. [[ed: post infection]] consistent with Zhang et al. (2009b), but enhanced CFU on day 7 p.i. consistent with David et al. (2004) (figure 1a–d)—which resolves these previously conflicting studies and highlights the importance of tracking dynamics throughout infection in order to capture full effects of the treatment of interest. It is possible that these findings may be relevant only to the specific strains we have examined and further studies should be carried out to determine if our results hold across B. pertussis and B. parapertussis strains. <<<

Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis are closely related (but distinct) species, both of which cause pertussis in humans. They aren't sure whether their work might not be specific to the particular variants (strains) of each species that they used. They also report that:

>>> Directly proving aP vaccination puts treated people at risk of acquiring B. parapertussis is very difficult, but we hope our study highlights the need for more thorough B. parapertussis epidemiological data and encourages further work in this neglected area. If our experiments are capturing the phenomenology of what is happening under aP vaccination in humans, it may be important to consider the introduction of vaccines that better protect against both bordetellae; for example, live attenuated B. pertussis nasal vaccines (Mielcarek et al. 2006), wP vaccines containing both B. pertussis and B. parapertussis (Burianova-Vysoka et al. 1970), or supplementation of aP vaccines with B. parapertussis protective antigens (Zhang et al. 2009a). An enhanced understanding of the evolutionary consequences of widespread aP vaccination is needed in order to optimize the next generation of vaccination strategies and fully reap the benefits of this powerful medical intervention. <<<







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