Around Town | April 16, 2021 | Palo Alto Weekly | Palo Alto Online |


https://paloaltoonline.com/print/story/print/2021/04/16/around-town


Palo Alto Weekly

News - April 16, 2021

Around Town

IN TRIBUTE ... Many locals have spent the past year recognizing essential workers during the pandemic by holding a nightly applause, producing masks or delivering meals, among other acts. Palo Alto resident Elizabeth Lada utilitized her artistic talent for "The Hero Art Project" by Arthouse.NYC, which pairs artists with the families of health care providers who have died from COVID-19 for a portrait of their loved one. Lada offered her services to the New York gallery, which assigned her to produce a painting of Dr. Frank Gabrin. Gabrin, 60, was a New York physician who became the nation's first emergency room doctor that died of the deadly disease on March 31, 2020, according to a story by The Guardian. With little personal protective equipment available last year, Gabrin used the same face mask for multiple shifts, which went against Food and Drug Administration guidance, the article states. Lada was provided with a photo of Gabrin in the middle of last year to help her create the painting. "He seemed like a really compassionate person. I really wanted to show that compassion and earnest hard work in his eyes, but I also felt like there was a lot of pain going on there," Lada said of Gabrin, who was a two-time cancer survivor. Lada completed the painting in four weeks and sent the original piece to Gabrin's husband, Arnold Vargas, who was "touched and grateful." The project's paintings were displayed in the gallery's window and a large screen in Manhattan for a few days. Arthouse.NYC is also currently sharing the portraits digitally through electronic kiosks set up in New York City, Miami and Los Angeles, Lada said.

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