Report highlights discrimination in Palo Alto, both past and present | January 22, 2021 | Palo Alto Weekly | Palo Alto Online |

Palo Alto Weekly

News - January 22, 2021

Report highlights discrimination in Palo Alto, both past and present

Human Relations Commission prepares for series of community conversations on race and belonging

by Gennady Sheyner

The history of Black and brown communities in Palo Alto is blighted by discrimination, exclusion, unfair policing and everyday indignities that collectively make residents of color feel like they don't belong, a newly released report from the city's Human Relations Commission concludes.

Titled "Black and Brown in Palo Alto," the report relied on both historical accounts and recent testimony from dozens of current and recent residents, many of whom spoke out about their experiences in Palo Alto in recent forums, rallies and commission discussions. The City Council commissioned it in May as part of a broad effort to address racial inequality in the aftermath of George Floyd's killing by a police officer in Minnesota.

For Raven Malone, who ran for City Council last year, these stories literally hit close to home. Last year, her campaign lawn sign was covered with a "White Lives Matter" sign, she told the council. She recalled being questioned at a council forum about her ability to "comprehend Palo Alto" and said people often assumed she was talking about East Palo Alto rather than her home city.

"When Black and brown people speak out about feeling unwelcome, we're told that we can leave," Malone told the council Tuesday. "We as Palo Altans have to stop trying to pretend like racism doesn't exist here or silencing Black and brown people when we speak out about it."

The Rev. Kaloma Smith, chair of the Human Relations Commission, presented the report to the council on Tuesday and outlined the commission's next planned steps to address the council's priority of addressing racial inequality. The main component of this work is a series of "community circles" — groups of about 10 people that would meet for conversations about race and belonging. The commission has a goal of meeting with 100 community leaders, who would then help facilitate 100 such circles in the next 24 months.

Smith, who serves as pastor at the University AME Zion Church, recited a litany of stories about residents of color getting treated with hostility by police officers, eyed suspiciously at Stanford Shopping Center and disrespected by strangers on the street. Smith said commissioners went far and wide to seek out stories for the reports. They were "shocked where the data led us," he said.

The report highlights four themes that stood out in people's comments: the persistence of discrimination over a long period of time; the consistency of aggressions, including daily microaggressions; a shortage of positive role models in their hometown; and denial of housing to Black and brown families.

"What we clearly have here and what another 20 pages of notes and people's lived experiences in our city (tell us) is we have a city where people of color don't feel like they belong, no matter their economic position, no matter their position in corporate spaces or academic spaces," Smith said.

Smith acknowledged the inherently limited role that city government has when it comes to influencing behavior around race. One question that he and the commission wrestled with as they put the report together was: How does policy modify behavior?

"What seemed to be interesting to me is, if we had a perfect police department and we have perfect housing — would that make it a perfect community for Black and brown folks? Would they still not feel all the microaggressions and the challenges in the culture in our city?" Smith asked.

Mayor Tom DuBois agreed with Smith that progress on racial justice will require difficult conversations and strongly supported the proposal for community circles, for which he said he would gladly sign up.

"We're talking about changing hearts," DuBois said. "It's not about laws at this point. It's not about trying to regulate."

Council member Lydia Kou called the report "sobering" and said she would like to see more education in Palo Alto about the city's history of race relations. This includes a greater awareness of significant figures like Roy Clay, who in 1970 became Palo Alto's first Black council member.

The commission's report includes a timeline of milestones, events and injustices involving Black and brown residents: from Pop Harris opening a shoeshine stand near the Stanford University campus trolley in 1892 and the Ku Klux Klan parading through Palo Alto streets and burning crosses in 1924, to Joseph Eichler applying an anti-discrimination policy to his residential communities in 1949 and the recent spate of hate crimes, including vandalism at Smith's church.

The report in May as part of a broad menu of actions the council approved last year in response to local and national protests against racial inequity and police brutality. Since then, the council and the Police Department revised the department's policy manual to ban all holds that restrict air flow and to include more information about de-escalation techniques, consistent with the 8 Can't Wait campaign. Council members are also considering broadening the scope of the city's independent police auditor, allowing the auditing firm OIR Group to investigate a wider range of police incidents that involve force.

Some council members suggested Tuesday that the city should go further. Vice Mayor Pat Burt cited the city's legacy of "redlining" — racial discrimination in mortgage lending — in the 1940s and 1950s, which shaped the demographics of both Palo Alto and East Palo Alto and helped determine their present composition.

"For most of my adult life, I thought of East Palo Alto as our sister community — not another city in another county, but the other community that when we put our two communities together, we get something that resembles social and economic balance. And neither of our communities, separately, do that," Burt said. "I just want to make sure we continue to have an active consciousness and engagement with building those deeper relationships with our true neighbors in East Palo Alto."

Council member Alison Cormack said that she hopes listening to the narratives in the report will help people "understand that the experience of Black and brown people in our community needs to be improved." She thanked the people who were willing to tell their stories.

"I know it's painful, but it's going to help us all do better," Cormack said.

READ THE REPORT

Read the Human Relations Commission report, "Black and Brown in Palo Alto: History and current experience," at paloaltoonline.com/news/reports/1611092105.pdf.

Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at [email protected]

Comments

Posted by WhatAboutme
a resident of Midtown
on Jan 21, 2021 at 12:38 pm

WhatAboutme is a registered user.

A 45 page pdf to tell us how 'they don't feel they belong', what about a non-brown person that doesn't feel they belong in a VHCOL city.

This seems a ridiculous waste of money to document.

How about someone with an anxiety disorder that is WHITE, and how they feel in a HCOL city -- I cannot claim prejudice when someone , whether a waiter/waitress or someone I pass on a sidewalk is a racist as I'm white.

Let's definitely pour more money into these useless reports!

More $$ advertising dollars for paloaltoonline or what -- no one I know is racist is this city.


Posted by WhatAboutme
a resident of Midtown
on Jan 21, 2021 at 12:48 pm

WhatAboutme is a registered user.

I've read more of this pdf, if you and your family have felt harassed by police for the past 40 years, why haven't you moved.

Something is amiss with this 'report'.

And I do not believe this anonymous person was detained and police a u-turn whenever seeing this person of color driving. If you hated it THIS much, if you felt so much that an entire city and your college was racist, then why wouldn't you move to somewhere you felt you would be accepted -- this all sounds like another 'oh i didn't belong in Foothills' so let's start a lawsuit.


Posted by Shavonne Cook
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Jan 21, 2021 at 1:10 pm

Shavonne Cook is a registered user.

Since the number of African American residents in Palo Alto constitutes only about 2% at best, it is difficult for the white majority to visualize this demographic as one worth going the extra distance for.

Only when forced to do so (as in addressing the needs & concerns of the ever-increasing Asian population in Palo Alto) will the city take any further steps towards balancing equality for other peoples of color & ethnicity.

Much of this has to do with money & influence as the recently-arrived Mandarin residents are well-to-do for the most part & are afforded the opportunity to reside in some of Palo Alto's finest neighborhoods.

Not so for most African Americans who continue to suffer economically under the hands of their white employers who continue to demean, condescend, & exploit the proud & now angry African American man as well as African American women.

About the only vestige of pseudo respect given a black person is if he or she happens to be a superb professional athlete. Then the white dominated sports media gushes & kow-tows to them but only while they are still wearing a uniform or jersey. After that, all bets are off.

Palo Alto is not unique in it's legacy of racism however subtle. This is a national disgrace as well & one that will be with us for an extended period of time.

If General Sherman's Special Field Order #15 had not been rescinded by the racist POTUS Andrew Johnson, 40 million African Americans could lay claim today to a promise unkept by another impeached white U.S. president.


Posted by We are a country of whiners
a resident of Downtown North
on Jan 21, 2021 at 1:26 pm

We are a country of whiners is a registered user.

Everyone in the country seems to have a grievance and they all think others should pay attention to them - Black, Hispanic, Asian, White, gay, mental disorders, disabilities, food intolerances, perfume intolerance, religious intolerance. Good thing we are such a rich and well fed country that people can spend their lives complaining about these issues rather than working all day to find food for their family.

Bottom line today is - if you can afford it - you can live in Palo Alto. The higher price always wins.

Further people feel alienated when surrounded by people of different colors or cultures if they do not know the people. If they do know them then this becomes insignificant.

Third - of course there are individuals who express racism - people of all colors. It is hard wired in our species. Instead of constantly researching past issues showing individuals responsible for racist acts and that have repeatedly shown that the entity of the City of Palo Alto itself never once engaged in racism, (there was never any city sanctioned red-lining, or exclusion acts), why don't people who care about this discuss treating all people politely and kindly if they are acting in the same manner.


Posted by Deb
a resident of Evergreen Park
on Jan 21, 2021 at 1:49 pm

Deb is a registered user.

Raven Malone feels unwelcome in Palo Alto? Guess what? I'm "white," I've lived in Palo Alto all of my life (58 years) and I've never felt welcome in Palo Alto. I was excluded growing up and as Palo Alto's wealth has increased, so has the disdain, to the point where I am excluded and snubbed all the time because I'm white by a racial/cultural contingent that now represents the wealthiest racial/cultural group in the city. I'm sure racism exists, but I'm even more sure that people would rather tear their hair, beat their breasts and wail and moan about what may or may not be personal insults than address the real issue: R1 Zoning! If Palo Alto had developed as a city commensurate to the local economic growth, we would never have descended into the exclusivist hell where we now all dwell.


Posted by NeilsonBuchanan
a resident of Downtown North
on Jan 21, 2021 at 1:50 pm

NeilsonBuchanan is a registered user.

These early reader reactions do not surprise me. And they give City Council and all of us citizens reason to listen carefully to the HRC.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 21, 2021 at 2:15 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

This whole topic is out of my wheelhouse. Raven Malone is a well-spoken young lady. However her position on housing was playing to the party SB50 contingent which is not a winner in this election. As to policy we vote for the people who support our policies. If she came into the political race and said that she would protect the neighborhood policies which she proclaimed to love then she would have done better.

Palo Alto is not a metro area - we do not have jobs here that typically occur in a metro area. She was being positioned with poor policies that are not favored by this city but are favored by the party leaders who were supporting her. She would have done well in Oakland, San Jose, or San Francisco that has a broader metro base of jobs and political outlook.


Posted by What Will They Do Next
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jan 21, 2021 at 3:57 pm

What Will They Do Next is a registered user.

@Shavonne Cook ..."Not so for most African Americans who continue to suffer economically under the hands of their white employers who continue to demean, condescend, & exploit the proud & now angry African American man as well as African American women."

Please cite specific examples of this happening in Palo Alto backed by facts and evidence.


Posted by The Voice of Palo Alto
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jan 21, 2021 at 7:10 pm

The Voice of Palo Alto is a registered user.

“When Black and brown people speak out about feeling unwelcome, we're told that we can leave," Malone told the council Tuesday.”

I am so happy that although Raven didn’t win a seat on the city council(like she should have), she is still here in Palo Alto continuing the fight for Social justice. What happened to her regarding the sign on her lawn was an absolute disgrace. Raven you are welcome here! Don’t let anyone get you down. I am not sure what this report will do, but reading this article it seemed to open some eyes. Maybe this report will be the first step in a better direction.

Shavonne is spot on. She doesn’t need to provide you evidence. In the beginning, she was first speaking about their thoughts/experiences here locally in PA. The middle was more of a general statement about their thoughts about how they feel African Americans are treated in society(pro athletes/employer references). At the end Shavonne brought it back locally to PA and ended with a historical fact. They don’t need to provide you evidence just like you don’t when you blame teachers unions for everything and say to freeze teacher salaries. Great comment Shavonne!


Posted by Resident
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jan 21, 2021 at 8:23 pm

Resident is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


Posted by DTN Paul
a resident of Downtown North
on Jan 21, 2021 at 9:57 pm

DTN Paul is a registered user.

This was not the most well written or comprehensible report (and sorry, that font is horrific) but that doesn’t make the thesis and findings any less true. As Amanda Gorman’s amazing inaugural poem noted, we are a nation (and city) that is “unfinished.” I hope we can keep striving to get closer to our ideals.


Posted by Ebony And Ivory
a resident of another community
on Jan 22, 2021 at 6:12 am

Ebony And Ivory is a registered user.

At the time of its creation, the Declaration of Independence was drafted to ensure that 'all WHITE men were created equal' as slaves were considered the personal property of their owners.

Reconstruction, Affirmative Action and the Civil Rights Act were implemented to level the playing field but this angered countless poor and undereducated white people who comprise the likes of disenfranchised hate groups both past and present.

The irony is that many educated and wealthy white people feel the same way but they tend to keep their thoughts to themselves as there are other ways for them to practice their private and personal brand of racism.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 22, 2021 at 7:09 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

As they say in the Real Estate industry - location, location, location. Any focus on any topic has to include the financial impacts supporting the POV's. Also the history of a location. During WW2 CA and the bay area were the home of the Pacific Theatre with military bases building planes, ships, satellites. That is the job rich period in which all were able to reach the "middle class" due to a big economy. Oakland had a stand out history.

The population increase generated the housing market in the total bay area which put the families of school age children into "neighborhoods" and cities which had the new schools. Cities organized locations with schools, community centers, playing fields. Los Angeles grew into the "valley" with a big housing market. Hollywood grew the film industry which promoted music, story telling, and art of the film.

Fast forward to today the military bases are shut down, no planes being built, no ships being built, fewer satellites being built - all moved to other states which have a better tax base. The huge rail systems are not getting much funding due to increase in the airplane transportation industry. The economy of the state and the US is truncated in the types of jobs which support a population. That is for all peoples and is not race specific.

This city location on the peninsula is a thin piece of land, mostly consumed by SU which has been the job driver for the location. Then you add Google, FB, and other technology driven businesses.

For the purposes of this discussion what is the plan forward as to how all races integrate into the technology business? How are all races who want to live here prepare for the type of jobs that are available? That is the open question. This is not a metro area. Metro areas have a broader base of jobs. So what is the plan forward?


Posted by Resident
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jan 22, 2021 at 9:51 am

Resident is a registered user.

"Persistent" and "Consistent"...and (mostly) Non-Existent?

Living in PA is expensive for anyone and everyone. What is the racial makeup of California's population, adjusted for income? How does this compare to PA residency percentages?

For purposes of illustration, this report claims (without apparent citation) on its p. 7 that "Black or African American" people made up 6.5% of California's population, and 1.8% of PA population, both as of July, 2019. If, say, 10% of "Black of African American" Californians had income necessary for PA's cost-of-living in July 2019, then 0.65% "Black or African American" Californians could afford to live in PA. The report claims 1.8% of PA residents were "Black or African American".

Accordingly, adjusted for income necessary to meet PA cost-of-living, are "Black or African American" people overrepresented in PA? If overrepresented, aren't these lived choices powerful evidence to the contrary of the gist of the report?


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 22, 2021 at 9:53 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

The "Voice of Palo Alto" was very busy during the election process of basically trying to bulldoze a set of programs and opinions which attempted to plow the state political far left programs onto the city. Those programs may work for major metro areas which have a wide bandwidth of job types but do not fit a small suburban city which sits beside a University which does it's own thing. That did not help Raven Malone. It was the downside of her political venture.

She is a nice person who has to do her own thing, think her own thoughts, and then put them out there for debate and final resolution in the voting booth. She will get there if she is her own person. What any political person has to do is read the room before offering opinions which are in direct conflict with the position they are trying to win.


Posted by What Will They Do Next
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jan 22, 2021 at 11:06 am

What Will They Do Next is a registered user.

@ Ebony and Ivory ... sadly, it goes both ways and that is a fact.


Posted by Terrell James
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Jan 22, 2021 at 4:00 pm

Terrell James is a registered user.

@ Ebony and Ivory ... sadly, it goes both ways and that is a fact.

@What Will They Do Next

To reference your prior quote,

Please cite specific examples of this happening in Palo Alto backed by facts and evidence.


Posted by Nayeli
a resident of Midtown
on Jan 22, 2021 at 5:14 pm

Nayeli is a registered user.

As a Hispanic woman and immigrant living in Palo Alto, I find the claims of "racial-ethnic discrimination" to be greatly exaggerated. In fact, I've faced discrimination over being a CONSERVATIVE more than being Hispanic, an immigrant and/or a woman.


Posted by The Voice of Palo Alto
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jan 22, 2021 at 5:44 pm

The Voice of Palo Alto is a registered user.

“The "Voice of Palo Alto" was very busy during the election process of basically trying to bulldoze a set of programs and opinions which attempted to plow the state political far left programs onto the city.”

Please state specifically the opinions I made and the programs I was “bulldozing.” I remember supporting Raven Malone for City Council because I felt she would be a fantastic addition so now I’m the “Far Left.” Calling me (and somewhat by extension Raven Malone) “the far left” doesn’t seem to be at the very least a micro aggression. Please add page 46 to the PDF for Resident 1.

“She will get there if she is her own person. What any political person has to do is read the room before offering opinions which are in direct conflict with the position they are trying to win.“

Also, this. On one hand you say Raven should be her own person but then she offered her own opinions “that were in conflict with the position she was trying to win.” Well, that arguably could be an error politically as far as potentially winning the position she was vying for, but she WAS being her own person by offering her own opinions. Is Raven not allowed to offer her own opinions? Why does she have to “read the room?” So it does sound like since she gave her own opinion, was being her own person, and did put them out for debate “for the voting booth, you and other voters didn’t agree with her opinions and she lost fair and square. But I mean is this another example of a micro aggression? Why is Raven required to “read the room?” Did the other candidates have to “read the room?” Like Raven stated in the article, that’s just code for her being asked “about her ability to comprehend Palo Alto.” At the very least, this part of your comment was contradictory.

“We're talking about changing hearts," DuBois said.“
Maybe your heart can change like the Mayor stated.

@Terell- WWTDN adds empty comments like “punish the teachers!” like the pandemic is the teacher’s fault, but then expect others to provide evidence for them. Laughable.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 22, 2021 at 6:10 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

The California Democratic Party is pushing the breakdown of the residential structure of the city via SB50 and ABAG - of which most people in this city do not agree. Anyone who in their political positions espouses the promotion of putting a 4-plex in the middle of a R-1 suburban housing neighborhood is not going to win many votes.

Both SB50 and ABAG are political constructs which do not meet the current economical status of the city and state. Possibly applicable to a metro cities like Oakland, San Francisco, San Jose which have major international airports, major rail systems, major port systems, and variable business bases.

If a person wants to live in a place where a four-plex is sitting in the middle of a residential neighborhood then go to city in which that is an acceptable situation. A person has to make that choice and then proceed accordingly.


Posted by Mark Michael
a resident of Community Center
on Jan 23, 2021 at 8:22 am

Mark Michael is a registered user.

My family moved from Menlo Park to Palo Alto when I was 9 years old -- 60 years ago. I have lived here off and on ever since. I started my professional career in Honolulu where there is racial and cultural diversity with Caucasians in the minority. In recent decades, Palo Alto's ethnic diversity has increased, although more so with Asian and Indian descent. What was most distinctive in 1960, when we arrived, and present day, is the level of household education. Graduate and professional degrees are the norm. Correlating diversity with education and economics introduces complexity, but extends the analysis beyond simple bias or the consequences of discrimination. I had to look up the acronym of VHCOL, which seems obvious. Cost of living here is -- bluntly -- ridiculous. VCs tell us that Palo Alto is a "2-exit town." One of the more obscure but relevant bell-shaped curves involves the dramatically unequal distribution of entrepreneurial genius within the population. True innovators and entrepreneurs are rare.
Growing up, I met Bill Hewlett, and Dr. Shumway lived around the corner. Years later I sat next to Steve Jobs and his family at a middle school recital. Zuckerberg and Page and Mayer live within walking distance of the community center. Mom worked with Doug Englebart at SRI. Many of the people living on my once-modest street next to the library are or were CEOs, VCs, Private Equity partners, or merely low paid professionals like surgeons or major law firm partners or chief technology officers. There are barriers to affordability within this bizarre ecosystem of genius. Bias and discrimination are horrible and persistent, and to some extent ubiquitous. If I might close by being politically incorrect -- in my Silicon Valley career, we did many mergers and acquisitions. The county barrier complicates things certainly, but why not a merger of Palo Alto with East Palo Alto? It would do us both good. And, by the way, credit to Stanford as a magnet for talent from around the world. The university brought my parents here to study and settle.


Posted by Hinrich
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jan 23, 2021 at 10:35 am

Hinrich is a registered user.

Enough. Racism has become a major industry. Every day, in every way racism saturates the media. Critical race theory, reparations, Black Lives Matter, etc. - who is pushing this junk? Americans should be proud of their progress. We are the most multi-cultural, most multi-racial country anywhere, ever. We all need to be sensitive to others and learn better ways to co-exist which was on a pretty good track until the racism industry started it's full assault. Remind people to honor the Golden Rule (treat others as you want to be treated) - that's it. It's simple. It's true that in our meritocracy some groups fall behind. It's especially true now. Wealth has concentrated at the top and this is a bad problem for all of us. Wealth has to be invested back into opportunity at the bottom. It's not a matter of race but essential to keeping everyone moving forward. I think most people want that for everyone. Twitter, Facebook, news media, etc. have become toxic and devisive - anti-social media selling a false narrative that most are guilty, inherently racist and in need of cleansing and reform. That now 'equity' must be the new means of atonement. This is crazy.


Posted by Duveneck resident
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jan 23, 2021 at 11:33 am

Duveneck resident is a registered user.

As usual, this Comments section is dominated by a mix of reactionaries, and apologists for the status quo; most of them are repeat-posters, who react predictably on nearly every online article.

Mr Shayner continues IMO to report fairly and well, and the Publisher is to be commended for managing to keep quality community reporting alive.

But the unbalance found in the Comments is profound. Twelve thousand people marched for equal justice on June 6, 2020. Weigh that fact, against the handful of reactionary remarks here.

Bravo to the HRC. May Council continue to make this issue of prime importance during the coming years.


Posted by JR McDugan
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jan 23, 2021 at 1:04 pm

JR McDugan is a registered user.

It's worth mentioning that South Palo Alto has a legacy of racial equality and anti-racism, starting from when Mr. Eichler refused to implement racist housing policies for his developments. Unfortunately North Palo Alto has a legacy of discrimination, and there is still much work to do to make amends on that side of town.


Posted by Luciano Benvenue
a resident of another community
on Jan 23, 2021 at 2:17 pm

Luciano Benvenue is a registered user.

∆ It's worth mentioning that South Palo Alto has a legacy of racial equality and anti-racism...North Palo Alto has a legacy of discrimination, and there is still much work to do to make amends on that side of town.

∆ Is this factor primarily due to wealth disparity and the predominance of white racist neighborhoods in the northern portion of Palo Alto?

Being from Boston, it has been my experience that wealthy white Northern people can be just as racist as white people from the South.

It is interesting to note that Palo Alto may not be any different than other parts of the country given the threatened NAACP/ACLU legal intervention at Foothills Park to ensure open access to non-residents including people of all color.

I was told by a South Palo Alto old-timer that the ecological concerns cited was just a cloud cover for maintaining a certain air of exclusivity and white privilege.








Posted by roberta winslow
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jan 23, 2021 at 7:30 pm

roberta winslow is a registered user.

We recently moved to Palo Alto and it is shocking that there is a noteworthy degree of closet bigotry in a university community such as Palo Alto.

Yellow Springs, OH (where we are from) is a small college town (Antioch University) where African American and white families co-exist with zero strife.

It is very disturbing to learn that some of our neighbors are NIMBY from the standpoint of racial harmony.


Posted by Anton Davis
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Jan 23, 2021 at 7:48 pm

Anton Davis is a registered user.

earlier quotation - "The county barrier complicates things certainly, but why not a merger of Palo Alto with East Palo Alto? It would do us both good."

This will never happen because a number of white Palo Alto residents would be deeply concerned about their property values going down.

It was difficult enough for some of them to open Foothills Park to all people of color and diversity.

Liberal bigotry tends to be prevalent where there is wealth and affluence.


Posted by Zhou Li
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Jan 23, 2021 at 9:24 pm

Zhou Li is a registered user.

It is not just African Americans who feel the silent racism in Palo Alto.

Though we are fortunate to have immigrated to the United States and settled in Palo Alto, we still feel a certain degree of unwelcomeness as do many of our friends and fellow residents from China.

Countless white Palo Altans are seemingly uncomfortable with ethnic diversity except for the restaurants they frequent offering various Asian cuisine.


Posted by Douglas Moran
a resident of Barron Park
on Jan 24, 2021 at 12:06 am

Douglas Moran is a registered user.

@Anton Davis

The reason that Palo Alto and East Palo Alto can't merge is not racism but state law: Cities cannot span a county boundary. Another is that cities cannot be disjoint: That is why there is a narrow strip of land connecting main Palo Alto to the Pearson-Arastradero Preserve.
But why bother to figure out the first part of the quote -- "The county barrier complicates things certainly" -- when you can simply cry racism?


Posted by David Branch
a resident of College Terrace
on Jan 24, 2021 at 9:06 am

David Branch is a registered user.

Many Palo Altans are in denial of their private and personal biases towards people of color because they do not want to be outed publically as bigots and this is understandable to a certain extent.

As a person of mixed-race heritage, if one has even the slightest trace of African-American ethnicity they are considered black by the white majority and only the lightest of African Americans are deemed acceptable by the predominantly white racist corporate decision-makers for key roles and positions in network television news, various movie roles and even presidential candidates as Barack Obama and Kamala Harris are both light-skinned and of mixed heritage.

Dark-skinned African Americans need not apply.



Posted by Trevonne Whitaker
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Jan 24, 2021 at 2:23 pm

Trevonne Whitaker is a registered user.

Given the past commentaries, what can Palo Alto and its unconfirmed number of bigoted residents do to overcome this subtle yet pervasive closet racism?

The commission report was a step in the right direction but there are those who either will either refute it's findings or remain in denial.

The contested opening of Foothills Park was a classic example of local elitism and racism posed as environmental concerns.

Can and will Palo Alto ever escape or evolve past this narrow mindset?


Posted by Douglas Moran
a resident of Barron Park
on Jan 24, 2021 at 6:48 pm

Douglas Moran is a registered user.

@David Branch: "...if one has even the slightest trace of African-American ethnicity they are considered black by the white majority..."

And just how would that determination be made? DNA is highly ambiguous/inaccurate on ethnicity (besides "Race is a social construct"). Genealogical research has problems: missing records, incorrect records (esp paternity), and parents misreporting their race.


Posted by Online Name
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jan 24, 2021 at 8:23 pm

Online Name is a registered user.

@David Branch, Michelle Obama isn't exactly light-skinned and many people of all races admire her and were praising her beauty and poise this week.


Posted by Latrelle W.
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Jan 25, 2021 at 8:36 am

Latrelle W. is a registered user.

Interestingly enough, I was stopped & questioned by the PAPD once during the time of this past controversy.

Web Link

I was asked by an officer what I was doing in a Palo Alto neighborhood where I did not reside & that the PD was only looking out on behalf of the best interests of the city residents...most likely WHITE residents.

The chief who initiated this racial profiling practice has since resigned-retired and hopefully her mandates were not reflective of the majority of Palo Alto residents.

But one never knows.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 25, 2021 at 10:05 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

I grew up Los Angeles - a city when growing up had Olivera Street where we visited monthly to shop the bodegas and eat good food; China Town also to shop for pretty artifacts and eat good food; Farmer's Market which had representative food and trinkets from around the world; and then what we called the BBQ area where many from Africa and related areas had their takes on how to produce great barbeque, and sweet potato pies. All their distinctive approaches as to which ingredients produced the best results.

LA is a large metro area with jobs for all. Freeways moving people all over to explore different sections which had different tourist presentations on culture and diversity. People went all over to see what else was going on in the city and see other people - all in Fairley distinctive locations.

So I read all of these comments and wonder why focused on Palo Alto? My mother grew up here on SU campus - her father from Germany - My father went to school here - he from the central valley, and all of their friends who came from different locations around the world. Why carving out this city which is one of all cities in the state - all with their distinctive cultures based on what the economy is for that city?

So all is in the interpretation of where people came from and what they are doing here? In the past the University and now big tech. SF the city wider spectrum with fishing and good food. Museums to visit. Tourist going to see everything. Maybe we don' t have enough to visit and see? Our spectrum is reduced to the SU sporting events and professional sporting events. Our offerings are limited.


Posted by R. Cavendish
a resident of another community
on Jan 25, 2021 at 10:14 am

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quote: "So I read all of these comments and wonder why focused on Palo Alto?"

I suspect it is because the issues being discussed here is about Palo Alto and not those of Los Angeles.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 25, 2021 at 10:32 am

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SU is a consolidator of many ethnic and diverse groups of peoples. As we have noted universities in general make more money on foreign students. We are not lacking a population of diverse people. But due to our size limited in the number of avenues as to how they display their diverse aspects off-campus. When on campus for events you can see all of the types of people that live on campus. WE are not Berkley - we are not Oakland - all of which have their own cultural offerings due to bigger size and relationship to metro areas. SU does put on the biggest Indian Powwow every May. I have been there. That is tied to SU's earlier trademark Indian theme. The fact that we have a prior linkage to the gold rush and Indians is the state of where we are and the times we lived in. It is tied to the historical beginnings of CA. It is location, location, location.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 26, 2021 at 5:54 pm

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Duveneck resident - this forum is open to any and all who would like to comment and have an opinion on the subject at hand. Not any other person's problem if the field of responders is not to your liking. I personally disagree with many of the comments in the opinion section of the papers and wonder why they are even printed.
All you did was complain about the responders - you did not offer up an opinion on the topic at hand.


Posted by Alex
a resident of Barron Park
on Jan 27, 2021 at 1:32 pm

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“Palo Alto isn’t a metro area”

SIS WE’RE RIGHT SMACK DAB BETWEEN THE MIDDLE OF TWO!!! If you want to live in Mayberry so badly, then you’re welcome to move out to a small town in the middle of nowhere. But the way I see it, all you want to do is have your cake and eat it too: you want the convienience and benefits of a major metropolitan area, but you also want to live in a small town. Pick one.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 27, 2021 at 11:19 pm

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Alex - a metro area has am international airport, multiple rail connections, and for SF and Oakland major ports dealing in international transactions. The point being is that they have a very diverse economy that provides a lot of opportunities for all type jobs. They also have museums, colleges, and are tourist destinations. That is a diverse tax base that is not stuck on one avenue of economic support. The tax base is what supports the school system, rail system, and infrastructure upgrades as needed. A diverse economy, a diverse population.

Yes we are between two - SF is not doing well and is suffering to support their- residents. San Jose has their problems as redevelopment is pushing out small business.

If you follow the PACC meetings we are specific to what our budget can afford, what type of housing we can afford, and what projects to put a priority on, We are in our basket of issue specific to us. The tax base of those larger cities do not benefit us in the running of this city.

I used to go to SF on BART. That was fun. But SF is no longer fun. It is very weird. I never go to San Jose City - only to San Jose Airport. The football stadium is in Santa Clara - that is as far as I get for local amenities. We are talking economy here, tax base, and type of jobs that support this city. We have no international airport, no major rail connections, no port. We do have a university that has great entertainment and is our tourist attraction - the only one.


Posted by R. Cavendish
a resident of another community
on Jan 28, 2021 at 5:59 am

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this discussion appears to be veering off-topic. what does metro-life and public transportation have to do with the title of the article...

'Persistent' and 'consistent.' Report highlights Palo Alto's legacy of discrimination.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 28, 2021 at 1:50 pm

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Everything is applicable. If we are in a Sociology class studying this topic then all aspects of the location are pertinent. They all relate to JOBS, and the type of jobs available. The economy of an area, what type of business is transacted in that location, the infrastructure elements which in themselves are JOBS are pertinent.

SU is the biggest landholder in the area. The biggest employer, the biggest housing agent, and the biggest economy for this area. They therefore are part of this topic.

After WW2 this whole area changed dramatically. But we have to move out of the past to the future. Biden just shut down the pipeline that goes from Canada down to Texas for processing and shipment. They are now discussing the loss of jobs. A huge loss of jobs. The same type of closure of job opportunities have occurred in this location in the past. All elements are reflective of how society is changing. So look to the future to determine what type of life and jobs will be occurring in this area.


Posted by R. Cavendish
a resident of another community
on Jan 28, 2021 at 6:36 pm

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quote: "If we are in a Sociology class studying this topic then all aspects of the location are pertinent."

∆ location is irrelevant to this discussion unless you can tie the lead topic (racism) into the equation.

perhaps you could start by correlating viable employment opportunities (or the lack thereof) due to inherent racism and the subsequent reercussions relative to where various displaced or economically deprived ethnicities & minorities typically reside or are forced to reside.


Posted by R. Cavendish
a resident of another community
on Jan 28, 2021 at 6:53 pm

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typo/correction: reercussions > repercussions


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 28, 2021 at 9:16 pm

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The location is irrelevant? The FHP debacle was a "racist" named activity which has turned into a total breakdown in control by the city. The ACLU, the NAACP. And now we are exploring the racist activity in Palo Alto. This city is called out in specific terms. So we cannot go backward at this point in time so the question is how do we go forward? The profile of this city is shrinking so that is the challenge.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 30, 2021 at 11:03 am

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Let's not ignore "the Press" in this discussion. The San Francisco Chronicle opinion writers who are black have decamped the scene. Otis Taylor has gone to Atlanta because that is where the action is. He likes Action. Justin Phillips is going back to New Orleans because he prefers that social environment and food. And Da Mayor - Willie Brown has been eliminated because he now represents a predicament for the current VP. He is the person who initially promoted her through the ranks. And he no longer enjoys the "City" which was previously full of good food, good events, and beautiful scenery. He is viewed as a loose cannon now. That leaves us with the LBG community reporters, Tony Bravo and Kevin Fisher Paulson.

The SFC has previously used NY Times opinion writers who despise DT, some black, as does the SFC opinion desk. But what to do now that the current mayor London Breed is tangentially involved in a pay for play scheme by her direct reports. Bernie is appearing in many colorful depictions and there will be a bobble head doll now for him in his chair and mittens. And "Snowball" is busy throwing money at foreign governments? How to create Spin in that situation. Creating Spin is a challenge from any direction.

But to the topic at hand people want to be where they relate to what ever is going on. And millennials are busy rewriting history. Justin Phillips was offended because of the Aunt Jemimah picture on the box of pancake flour. What he did not know is that that family gets paid very well for that picture on the box - over $1m a year. End result - no picture on the box and no $1M to the family. Why do we let Millennials run this show? They have no history, no living knowledge of past history. Their indignation of past human foibles needs to be redirected to creating their own personal history.


Posted by R. Cavendish
a resident of another community
on Jan 30, 2021 at 11:27 am

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quote: "...millennials are busy rewriting history. Justin Phillips was offended because of the Aunt Jemimah picture on the box of pancake flour. What he did not know is that that family gets paid very well for that picture on the box - over $1m a year. End result - no picture on the box and no $1M to the family. Why do we let Millennials run this show? They have no history, no living knowledge of past history."

∆ interesting trademark info as my family would have no qualms about ancestral dipictions if we were receiving $1M per year in royalties.

true, most millennials seem to have no sense of past history preferring instead to reside in the present tense.

I asked a 30-something about this phenomena once and he replied it is because older people had far less history to learn and the textbooks were thinner.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 30, 2021 at 11:47 am

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So happy we have Wikipedia now. We can explore every topic from every angle and get the overall parameters through history to present time. The big history happened before we were born. When I visit relatives in Baltimore you can see the city that was, the port system that was, the site of numerous wars between the colonizers and other countries. Our relatives lived though the WW wars, the depression, the 1918 flu epidemic - my mother's father died on SU campus from that illness that enveloped this whole area with SU being a hospital. The bombing of Pearl Harbor and the entry into WW2, our parents lived through that and then built this area afterward. The big earthquake that brought down many pieces of the SU campus and the city of SF. Much of the forest in the hills was used to rebuild. Our position on the coast was the location of many firsts in both positive and negative events. History makes no promises as to how the future unfolds.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 1, 2021 at 9:54 am

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I am picking on Millennial Justin Phillips who will appear again to advise us on social equity in the SFC. In one article he was offended when he visited a Tiki bar in SF. Trying to stir up the Pacific Islander group? Hello - San Francisco is the main shipping point between Honolulu and the mainland port of Oakland. That is how they get their food -Costco and Safeway main dealers in the subsidy of human wellness. And in the past the way tourist got back an forth - Honolulu dependent on tourism. And given the state of the airlines is now looking better and better.

And worse the editor of the opinion section did not choose to instruct him that SF's history is directly tied to the shipping industry and the products that are transferred back and forth. And our current legislative leader in congress - her family is a landholder and shareholder in those products produced in that state.

So the SFC - Voice of the West opinion desk has no grasp of the actual history of this location. And who actually owns the outflow from that history. I and a whole group are waiting for a good time at a Tiki Bar in SF to celebrate the end of the Covid retrenchment. And the Pacific Islanders are waiting to celebrate the return of the tourists. Onward with Hula and all things Hawaiian. I am sure that the celebrants in New Orleans are also waiting to celebrate in their historically French Cajun manner.


Posted by Avery Burnham
a resident of another community
on Feb 2, 2021 at 10:23 am

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This a step in the right direction.

In San Francisco, the Washington & Lincoln high school names are being changed because Washington was a slaveowner and Lincoln did not acknowledge that Black Lives Matter in his Emancipation Proclamation.

The Biden administration is moving quickly to replace Andrew Jackson on the $20.00 bill with Harriet Tubman, founder of the Underground Railroad to free black slaves. This measure was detained by President Trump during his time in office.

Alexander Hamilton, Ulysses S. Grant and Benjamin Franklin should also be replaced on the $10.00, $50.00 and $100.00 bills.

Perhaps by a Hispanic American, Asian American and Muslim or Hindu American on ALL three denominations.

Washington and Lincoln could remain on the $1.00 and $5.00 bills respectively.

It is time for change. No pun intended.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 2, 2021 at 3:42 pm

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Yes - it is time for a change. The Stanford Mascot used to be the Indians. That added some larger festivity to the football games. And the biggest powwow took place on SU campus every May with dancing in full Indian culture presentation. Lots of items for sale. This was a big event. And because on SU campus you can assume that the Indian tribes were subsidized well for their appearance. Due to political correction the SU mascot is now a tree.

I send money to Indian Children's schools in the Dakotas and one in Arizona. they desperately need funds to support their schools and keep the children warm and well fed. What they all need is some subsidy by large organizations which celebrate their culture. When large organizations are coerced into "political correctness' all of these groups are cut-off from the celebration of their culture and subsidy of their economy.

The people who call for political correctness have only one goal in mind. That goal does not always talk to the well being of the people involved - it serves to cut them off from the larger society. The single goals of the current situation do not appear to see a bigger picture. They do not always recognize the unintended consequences of what transpires. The replacement of historic figures needs to bake in the histories of the people with all of their great accomplishments as well as their human foibles. No one here was there then. We are trying to rewrite history instead of creating a new history of our own with new current leaders. What role models do you all have today? What are they doing? How are they leading in the world where we are today? Re-writing history is big business now - and not to the good of all.


Posted by J. Burley
a resident of another community
on Feb 2, 2021 at 6:57 pm

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"The Stanford Mascot used to be the Indians....Due to political correction the SU mascot is now a tree."

There is nothing wrong with the Stanford mascot being a tree. As a proud Native American any and all charicatures depicting our people as savages or clown-like is demeaning.

Have you ever seen the 'classic' Stanford Indian cartoon of a sheepish-looking preppy Indian dressed in casual 'white man's clothes?

Until you have walked in another man's shoes (or moccasins) you will never fully understand the concept behind political correctness and mutual respect for ALL Americans.

Think about it.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 2, 2021 at 7:42 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

Have you ever been to New Orleans during Carnival? Have you ever been to San Francisco during one of their LBG festivities? Whole groups of people enjoy dressing up in costume. No one at those events is politically offended by the shows they put on. People go for those shows. Every one at SU stadium enjoyed and embraced their mascots. Have you been to Hawaii where people pay to go to big shows where performances are put on in costume? Performers work hard to perfect their crafts.

The children in the Indian schools are proud of their festivals.

Let's tell New Orleans that their Carnival is politically incorrect. Let's tell SF that their LBG festivities are politically incorrect. Go to Hawaii and tell the fire dancers that their shows are politically incorrect. How does that work for you? Hope you are sending money to the schools so that the children can go to school, eat, and practice their traditional dances and festivities.


Posted by PC Mom
a resident of another community
on Feb 3, 2021 at 6:44 am

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"Whole groups of people enjoy dressing up in costume."

True but that doesn't make it politically correct.

What about people who dress up as people they are not?

Some examples: Halloween costumes depicting Indians (both Native American and East), homeless people/hobos, gypsys, Buckwheat and other African American characters, Arabs, Asian people, Mexicans, gay men/lesbians or in drag etc.

Most Stanford students are not Indians so to have referred to themselves as such in the past is insulting to Native Americans.

Mascots and costumes depicting trees, animals and extinct groups of people are OK.

No one has an issue about the USC Trojans, SJSU Spartans, SDSU Aztecs, UC Bears or UCLA Bruins.

And if native people dress up as themselves, no one is questioning that choice.

But caricaturing other ethnicities is WRONG and in poor taste.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 5, 2021 at 10:16 am

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You all are confusing SU with the city of PA. An interesting read - go to Google and look up Stanford Mascots. A huge amount of information with timelines, pictures, and yes the need to conform to PC standards. Lots of pictures and calendars for future events. And lots of prior discussion on this topic. That confirms J. Burley's comments. However the person who was the Indian did enjoy the festivities.

Please try to differentiate SU from the city of PA which has city building concerns to deal with. Los Angeles has UCLA and USC plus a host of private colleges each doing their own thing and focusing on different programs. Menlo Park has Menlo College which is a local college which has a high percentage of foreign students.

Every college has a reputation and status goals they are working. They are busy competing with other colleges for ranking in specific focus points. They are focused on the business of being a university. The city of PA is focused on the requirements of water, energy, garbage pick-up, school systems, zoning, taxes, and city management. Each is in their specific lanes of endeavor.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 6, 2021 at 9:32 am

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Since we have moved onto Mascots note the the USC Trojan on his horse Traveler is a great symbol for that university. They appear in parades, fund raising events, and movies. Traveler the horse is a professional performer and gets paid well. And the fans love them. They add to the football games as entertainment and motivation.

I went to Hollywood High School whose mascot is the Sheik - this is Rudolph Valentino in a movie. When you live in Hollywood then a great sense of humor is employed to the general goings-on. Everyone knows this is a token to the great entertainment business that is the bedrock of that location.

SU failed the Indian - what if he rode in on a great horse in full regalia. An Educational moment and a Fundraiser for the Indian Community. They did have a well-known football player who was of Indian blood and very famous for that - Jim Plunket. But that was a different time. We do not see any sense of humor in this location, or role playing. Only people pointing fingers. Being PC. No wonder everyone is moving out.


Posted by USC Alumni
a resident of another community
on Feb 6, 2021 at 10:57 am

USC Alumni is a registered user.

@Resident 1-Adobe Meadows....

As PC Mom noted:"Mascots and costumes depicting trees, animals and extinct groups of people are OK."

Traveler is a non-issue. He is just a horse and the same applies to Mr. Ed.

Depictions of people is another matter and there are certain sensitivities involved.

As far as the Sheiks mascot at Hollywood High, that is for the locals to decide whether it is inappropriate or not and given the general perceived shallowness of the SoCal mindset, perhaps it will remain.

As for Jim Plunkett, to say that the Stanford Indian mascot was acceptable because he shared some Native American heritage is ludicrous.

Do you honestly believe that if a Stanford Indian mascot rode into the stadium on a horse like the USC mascot it would be acceptable in today's ethicnally sensitive climate? Seriously?

To my knowledge, only Notre Dame chooses to perpetuate a distasteful mascot, The Fighting Irish which in my opinion is a wrongful depiction of ALL Irish-Americans.

Trademarks and mascots depicting demeaning imagery of ANY ethnicity should be removed IMO, even if in your perspective a proud Indian riding a horse
is a symbol of ethnic pride.

Trojans don't matter. They are long gone and are now known as Turks who could care less about USC or where I graduated.

This overall lack of sensivities is why Palo Alto is getting a bad rap from the progressive movement.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 6, 2021 at 4:05 pm

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Those were good times - when that horse came out and the band started up - good times. Of course there was social justice - the riots next door in Watts in the USC area. No lack of social justice in LA - we have professional actors who portray those roles. But festivity is a requirement and we had plenty of it. All the bands that came through.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 8, 2021 at 5:25 pm

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Gee - poor Deb is wailing away about R-1 zoning. That is a feature of all of California cities - we did not invent it. It is how cities define and control growth.
I am always amazed by comments in which a person wails away about city structure. Most cities are not suppose to be the wild west and totally disorganized. If Deb wants a totally disorganized city then she needs to move because most people have no use for disorganization. And we all know that there are advocacy groups that work to disorganize the way cities are set-up. The papers name those groups. Keep stirring the pot. But you are not selling anything.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 9, 2021 at 7:40 am

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Back in the day South PA was farm land - it was laid out and planned in the 1950's. When you lay out a residential area you determine lot sizes that then tells you how much underground sewer system, water lines you need, and the path of how this all links up with the processing plants. That is electricity, water, sewage. For some reason this whole topic gets lost in the railings on housing. Except today where the papers are discussing a housing section that used to belong to a military base. It is not hooked up to the main city sewer or water lines. So valuable housing is now not available because there is no water, and no sewage lines.

People only see what is above ground with no reckoning with what is underground until that has a breakage. Looking at the disruption of the existing below ground systems people with no engineering knowledge rail away. How many toilets are being flushed that exceed the capability of our utility systems? We already know that the east bay has run into problems with sewage going in to the bay because it exceeds the capability of the systems. We know that has happened in the south bay - Alviso.

Maybe our local papers can go over to the processing plant and do a story about how a city grid is set-up and what the capability is - where does it all go. Engineers set up a system based on the assumption at the time and now those systems are breaking down.
I listened to one PACC meeting where people were discussing how to set up the sewage line for their ADU - you were now into the big bucks department - not the cities job to build sewage and water lines for your ADU.

As to building beyond the capability of a city to process all of the structural issues we can look at third world countries which do not invest in the required structural underpinnings for a city. It is not our goal to become a third world city or country.


Posted by Cicely
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Feb 9, 2021 at 10:51 am

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All things considered, reminiscing about college mascots and debating residential zoning codes has little or nothing to do with addressing the pervasive racism of both the Palo Alto and Stanford University communities.

Discrimination whether it's perpetuated by white real estate agents or white neighborhood residents is still discrimination.

Money talks in Palo Alto it is the god most of it's residents worship. Though the city has experienced an increased and growing population of recently arrived and wealthy Asian residents, there is a silent as well as vocal resentment by various old-timers who wish to preserve the Palo Alto of old, a predominantly white middle class community.

Times are changing and economic wealth (which countless African-Americans have been deprived of due to systemic racism), will essentially determine who resides or doesn't reside in Palo Alto.

The Asian population from abroad is rapidly growing and this constituancy will have a major impact on the future direction of the city.

And more power to them.

In the meantime, African-Americans will continue striving to overcome the pervasive racism and economic inequality that historically has been a trademark of the United States.

Palo Alto is but a mere pimple on an elephant's hind end and in the larger scale of things, its petty NIMBYisms are trivial matters.







Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 9, 2021 at 12:04 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

Africa is the second biggest continent on the planet and the point of origin for the human race. Yes -NPR said so and has the CD's. Look at Africa today - there is a United States of Africa which is suppose to mediate tensions among the individual countries. Yet the individual countries still have tribal entities that fight each other. First continent of origin should have worked out their water distribution systems, and should be ahead of the game on all fronts. How are they doing? People are fleeing to Libya and trying to escape to Europe in tiny boats, many not making it.
Africa the continent has to work out their own racism issues - tribe against tribe. Everyone can read a newspaper - international news in the papers every day. And it is not good. Maybe Africa should get their game on and work to build up their countries - they are in charge over there now. they are running their continent and need to produce results.


Posted by Mark Steinberg
a resident of Palo Alto Hills
on Feb 9, 2021 at 3:59 pm

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The United States of Africa is conceptual and would take united front including all of the continent's nations to become reality.

Unfortunately Africa remains marked by ongoing political corruption and perpetually scarred by the cruel and ruthless exploitation and brutality of the white European colonists who exploited both it's inhabitants and natural resources.

Had the greedy white people simply stayed in Europe and left the native Africans alone, perhaps a US of Africa could have emerged with its own unique history.

And had the rich white American southern plantation owners picked their cotton instead of buying slaves from Africa, chances are we would have less racial inequality issues in the US of America as well as no Civil War.



Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 9, 2021 at 7:12 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

I misspoke - The African Union (AU) was formed in 2002 and is based in Addis Ababa - Ethiopia. The union was formed after many other legislative type formations based on location. Check out the history via Wikipedia. Much transition of people before European colonization by all peoples.

Africa had, and still has the highest concentration of natural resources. The African nations had boats and were also on the move across the Atlantic to South America and the Caribbean islands. All peoples were looking for the natural resources that were lacking in their own locations due to over-consumption. Also much movement due to climate issues - great flooding, great monsoon periods, all driving people in the search for food. Also trade with China - animal parts, ivory, timber, palm oil.

Note that many of the pilgrims were "slaves" sent to look for new sources of food and resources. Slavery was universal for all, Alexander the Great and all of the great warriors roaming the overall lands. What is now the US was another location to grow crops in the south, cut lumber for more ships in the north - shipping being the main method of transition and exploration. Western Europe had major wars on-going - resources lacking in one locations being sought in other locations. Many current countries in Europe colonized parts of the US - each retaining some of the identity of the colonizers. The focus is the labor required to farm, fish, build, and move further out in search of resources. All on the move, all in search of a resource of choice - one being a gold rush in Africa, then a gold rush in the CA. The isthmus in Panama being a transition point from the Atlantic to Pacific. Global history is so interesting and is available in Wikipedia.


Posted by Jacob Epstein
a resident of Menlo Park
on Feb 10, 2021 at 10:15 am

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Enough of these trivial references to collegiate animal mascots and African continental hypotheses.

What we have here is an ongoing practice of systemic racism, not only in Palo Alto but throughout the country.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 10, 2021 at 8:14 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

Jacob - has anyone accused Menlo Park of having systemic racism? Has Menlo Park been through a law suit with the ACLU and the NAACP? I do not believe that Palo Alto has systemic racism, and the law suit was not representative of the facts of the case. Does Menlo Park keep appearing in newspaper articles which are uncomplimentary?
Don't think so. Menlo Park works to keep a low profile and residents of that city like a low profile. We on the other hand have a bunch of advocacy groups that enjoy rocking the boat.


Posted by Elinore Rosenstein
a resident of Atherton
on Feb 11, 2021 at 8:34 am

Elinore Rosenstein is a registered user.

@Resident 1-adobe meadows

While Menlo Park and Atherton may have some hidden elements of racism, Palo Alto tends to attract more attention because of its perceived sanctimony towards these issues.

Denial has a way of sticking out, especially in a world where real progressive actions are needed to make things better for all.

The Foothills Park debacle only cemented Palo Alto city residents' reputations as racists and elitists, an unfair assumption because many are not.

But a sizable number are and their vociferousness only drew more attention to their alleged prejudice.

Menlo Park and Atherton are quieter communities which explains why they are nicer places to reside.

Compare reading the Almanac to the Weekly. Palo Alto residents are always bickering about something. They remind me of my in-laws.

Lastly, bringing up college mascots and make-believe African United States distracts from this serious topic of racial equality.

We donate to organizations such as the ACLU, NAACP, and JDL.

And it was VERY satisfying to see the NAACP and ACLU confront Palo Alto regarding Foothills Park entrance.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 11, 2021 at 9:19 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

I agree with the assessment of Santa Clara County in general. San Mateo County does a better job of managing it's resources. San Mateo County does have more resources available - a more diverse economy. And Yes - life here is like a Dear Abby Column - families bicker and fight just on generational differences.

This is Black History month. Black History is more than a local issue. Focusing on a local issue to an extreme degree tends to relegate all of the other issues from the focus on black history in general. It can't be all on the down side just to satisfy a topic. One can read the downside for only so long. Where is the upside?

So the question on the table what is Atherton doing for the upside? What gems of knowledge are being offered up as to how to proceed? Donating to an organization is one choice - handing cash over. What else is happening on the upside? FHP is now open to everyone - that is an upside with some glitches that need to be worked out. Have yet to see what the upsides are at the city level, county level, and state level. And recognition of history via Wikipedia is accessible to all and provides more tools to further understanding the dynamics of history and the elements that contribute to the overall understanding of the human population.


Posted by Jacob Tseglin
a resident of Menlo Park
on Feb 11, 2021 at 10:02 am

Jacob Tseglin is a registered user.

Atherton residents need not concern themselves with the problems and issues Palo Alto is facing.

And neither do Menlo Park residents.

One must sleep in the bed they have made for themselves.


Posted by Ara Goldman
a resident of another community
on Feb 11, 2021 at 10:52 am

Ara Goldman is a registered user.

Palo Alto has a unique way of creating its own socio-economic problems followed by hypocritical denials and citizen outrage.

This is the often price some residents must pay for their self-professed enlightenment and false-imageries.




Posted by Robert
a resident of Stanford
on Feb 11, 2021 at 11:10 am

Robert is a registered user.

Palo Alto's well-documented racist attitudes and past cannot be easily re-written by superficial PC considerations.

The residents and city will need to make progressives strides to ensure that anyone who wishes to reside in Palo Alto can via inexpensive housing for those who meet certain criteria based on limited wealth and ethnicity.

Until then, Palo Alto will have to live up to its reputation as a prejudiced and elitist city.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 12, 2021 at 11:51 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

Robert - I assume you are a student at SU. You had to apply and get accepted. Did everyone who is a qualified student get accepted? Does SU have a requirement to accept any one who applies? Universities typically have a set of requirements which include what the student has majored in and if how many openings in that area of endeavor. I have a grand niece who is applying to many universities and I know she will be accepted to a number because she has focused on the requirements and is working to meet those qualifications.

One could say that there is a limited amount of JOBS in this city and they tend to be focused on tech JOBS. Someone who is interested in animal husbandry would do better at UC Davis which specializes in that area of endeavor.
It has little to do with race and everything in what the person has focused on to qualify for an opening. That focus starts in school where the counselors are telling a student to pick a major and work those qualifications. And the high schools try to provide guidance to get those students ready to progress onward.
You have to be able to get a job based on proven performance. You are putting the responsibility of providing a job on the city and it starts and belongs to the student.


Posted by Lateesha Williams
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Feb 12, 2021 at 12:22 pm

Lateesha Williams is a registered user.

@Resident 1-Adobe Meadows

Is it safe to assume that you are against Affirmative Action which strives to maintain certain allowances pertaining to college admissions and employment opportunities based on considerations of socio-economic inequalities (aka pervasive racism)?

If so, then people of my heritage should simply go back to picking cotten or working as domestics for 'the man' (aka white man) rather than trying to get past closed doors.

The college entrance of African-American athletes permitted via lowered academic standards for college admissions also falls into this category of racial exploitation because once they are USED, minimal university efforts are made to ensure that they actually graduate from college in the event they opt not to leave early for a professional sports career.
Most are cut loose.

Destroy a knee and it's back to the plantation (aka a menial job).

You are oversimplifying things by comparing apples to oranges...and chances are, you are a white person.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 12, 2021 at 5:28 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

I do not work for SU and have no involvement in any policies that they use. If you have a question for SU then you should address those question to the university. Call them up and find out who they are and who to talk to. I am not simplifying anything - I just know what I went through to get accepted to college - BS and MA. And it was not SU. I had some acceptances and some rejections. There are no guarantees.

Maybe you would like to share your experiences in applying for college and where you graduated from.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 12, 2021 at 5:47 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

WOW - it is either the good news or the bad news. Every one thinks that PA is deficient in any value qualities and that they would not like to live here. It appears that any where else is better. So all of those folks in Menlo Park, Atherton, and anywhere else have sold the public that that is where they need to be. So buckle up and get ready for the crowds that are going to descend upon you - they already are. And Atherton - all of that acreage out there can house a lot of 4-plexes, So congratulate yourselves for the great sell job.


Posted by Joaquin Mendoza
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Feb 12, 2021 at 7:09 pm

Joaquin Mendoza is a registered user.

This topic has been discussed many times over.

Some (not all) Palo Alto residents may need to confront their inner prejudices and ask themselves...what are they afraid of?

Fear led to Jim Crow laws in the South following Reconstruction and I suspect that many white Palo Alto residents are afraid of gradually losing control of their municipality to people of color.

In Palo Alto they need not fear African Americans and Hispanics because of the high cost of living in Palo Alto.

On the other hand, many wealthy Asians are moving to Palo Alto and altering the demographic landscape. In time they will become a stronger local political force and many of the older and more traditionally-minded white residents fear the changes.

This neuroses is essentially their problem as the Ohlones gave way to the Spanish and Mexican settlers and later, Mexicans landowners had to surrender their properties to white settlers arriving from the east via Manefest Destiny.

In twenty years, Palo Alto could very well become populated by a majority of wealthy Asian immigrants.

No big deal as the older, more conservative white residents will simply need to get over it.

Land ownership changes over time and white control is giving way to other ethnicities with even more money.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 12, 2021 at 10:50 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

Yes - many people I know are moving to EPA and doing a fixer upper. The proximity to FB is a desirable investment. Note that a number of projects are now starting for upgrades. So EPA is going through gentrification. It remains to be seeing what the population mix will be in EPA as FB builds it new village on Willow north of 101. All kind of neuroses past and present may materialize. Note that a majority of "white" people did not grow up here - they came as a result of work. I grew up in LA which is more mixed than anything in Norcal. Some came from Hawaii. Some came from New York which is extremely mixed. Norcal is not representative of the rest of the US.


Posted by Corinne
a resident of Crescent Park
on Feb 13, 2021 at 7:45 am

Corinne is a registered user.

All of this talk about Palo Alto being racist is disturbing to say the least.

Over the years, we have hired many people of color which in turn provided them with viable economic opportunities to provide for their families.

Our first gardener was of Japanese-American descent and our former housekeeper/cook was African American.

The painting contractor during our extensive home remodeling was Portuguese-American and his company was staffed by a number of skilled Hispanic house painters.

The old Stanford Cleaners on Pepper Avenue was operated by a very nice Japanese-American owner who always strove to meet cleaning deadlines for our clothing and drapery for which we were always very grateful.

The employment opportunities in Palo Alto were always vast as Hewlett-Packard, Varian Associates and Eastman Kodak hired employees of all ethnic backgrounds and let's not overlook employment opportunities at the Uniteted States Postal Service.

My father used to say that we all work for someone regardless if you are a lawyer or a laborer and Palo Alto was no different.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 13, 2021 at 11:50 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

Ford Aerospace/SSL that was on Fabian was a government contractor in the defense industry. That along with Lockheed as government contractors they are required to have in place and practice any and all government requirements for both federal and state statutes for EOP, AA, etc - all posted on the walls. Both the company and the customer bases - military bases around the world function with the same set of regulations. Every one worked as a team on classified projects - each with their area of expertise. Any where you went in the states and the world functioned with the same set of practices. When I see these comments I wonder what the rest of the world is doing. I think the Boomer groups following WW2 clean-up had a different world view. WW2 put the world on its head and we were all trying to put it back together. A totally different perspective than today.


Posted by Reggie Washington
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Feb 13, 2021 at 1:06 pm

Reggie Washington is a registered user.

✓Palo Alto is blighted by discrimination, exclusion, unfair policing and everyday indignities that collectively make residents of color feel like they don't belong, a newly released report from the city's Human Relations Commission concludes.

The above is from the article itself and talk about Ford Aerospace or former Stanford University mascots or Traveler horse from USC have nothing to do with this discussion topic.

Palo Alto has systemically albeit subtley kept people of color from feeling welcome in this city.

This has nothing to do with being able to afford a house in Palo Alto but rather the substandard treatment of African Americans by SUSPICIOUS store clerks and ongoing HARASSMENT by law enforcement.

White people cannot comprehend this issue nor will they ever because they are not people of color who have been the victims of racist policies and practices. Instead, the white people CREATED racism towards people of color because they are apprehensive or fearful of losing ground in a changing America.

This is an ongoing effort on their part from the southern Jim Crow era all the way to the recent January 6 Capitol riots attended by white Trump supporters trying to 'take back America' for the white people. How many black people did we see participating in this shameful event?

The only way things are going to change is through more interacial marriages and children of mixed heritage.

When EVERYONE is considered a person of color.



Posted by Jetemy Pfister
a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Feb 15, 2021 at 2:16 pm

Jetemy Pfister is a registered user.

The shameful legacy of the white man towards people of color also falls on the various ministries who did little to stem the tide of racism in America.

In the deep South white people would worship on Sunday and then burn crosses at night. Black people lived mostly in fear and subservient acquiesance to the whites and it wasn't until black militancy emerged in the 1960s did white folks finally begin to realize that they better keep an eye out over their shoulder.

The tide is shifting and some paranoid white people are now afraid of losing their racist grip on America.

Hence January 6, 2021.


Posted by Me 2
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Feb 15, 2021 at 3:50 pm

Me 2 is a registered user.

Meanwhile African-American-on-Asian crime is on the upswing.

Oh, are we not supposed to talk about that?


Posted by Lucinda MacLesh
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Feb 15, 2021 at 4:12 pm

Lucinda MacLesh is a registered user.

~"Meanwhile African-American-on-Asian crime is on the upswing."

Statistics please as a blanket statement carries little weight and could be construed as inflammatory towards our law-abiding black brothers and sisters.

As a white woman married to a proud African-American whose ancestors were enslaved by white southern plantation owners, I strongly believe that George Washington (a white slave owner) should be removed from all U.S. currency and replaced by someone else. And the same goes for Thomas Jefferson, another white slave holder from Virginia.

It is also refreshing to witness Confederate symbolism being removed from our schools and parks as these men and their offensive flags were not heroes except to white racists past and present.

African Americans do not pay homage to the likes of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson all of whom were white racists fighting to maintain the enslavement of black people.

Mohammed Ali is a national treasure to African Americans as is MLK, Malcom X, Rosa Parks and Barack Obama.


Posted by Me 2
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Feb 15, 2021 at 5:07 pm

Me 2 is a registered user.

"Statistics please as a blanket statement carries little weight and could be construed as inflammatory towards our law-abiding black brothers and sisters."

Oh, so I'm supposed to supply statistics when this report is full of anecdotal evidence? This report that kicked off this story "could be construed as inflammatory towards our law-abiding" white brothers and sisters.

Just need to look at recent stories in San Francisco and Oakland. And this issue has been going on for a long time (see 1992 Rodney King riots and Korean-owned stores).


Posted by Marianne Parker
a resident of Stanford
on Feb 16, 2021 at 6:56 am

Marianne Parker is a registered user.

It seems that much of this racial strife in America could have been avoided had the wealthy white southerners opted to utilize smaller-scaled cotton grower co-ops instead of larger plantations requiring a sizable number of workers.

Then there would have been no need to import black slaves to America. Slaves were very expensive and only the truly wealthy could afford to buy them.

There were many poor white sharecroppers who also grew cotton and it surprises me why they fought for the Confederacy to preserve the practice of slavery.

There is absolutely nothing to be proud of in regards to memorializing the former Confederacy or it's racist attitudes and people who raise or display Confederate flags are merely showcasing their ignorance and bigotry.

This is not to say that racism only exists in the south. In Boston and New York, racism towards blacks still exists today and it stems from the illiterate Irish immigrants who resented the migrated black population from the south and it's adverse impact on procuring available and menial jobs during an earlier period.

There is absolutely no reason for white people in Palo Alto to be racist because what occurred historically and economically in both the south and northeast did not take place here.

And so if a denial of racism is the card being played, a white elitist mentality is the next obvious and concealed ace.

There are many white people who think they are better than people of color and this goes back to European colonialization.

So in essence, Caucasians are responsible for 99% of the global problems related to racial injustice and exploitation.

I believe the late Malcom X referred to them as white devils.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 16, 2021 at 8:21 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

NPR just had their series - Africa - the Great Civilizations - a 6 hour series you can buy on CD's. Africa is the second biggest continent on the planet and where human life evolved. Huge activity going on before any one came to the North American continent. Great tribal leaders, trading of goods, boats being built to go across the Atlantic and Indian oceans, off to South America, China for the ivory trade, then up north for trade with western European peoples for needed products. Slave trade was a business - people needed to grow sugar cane - a big transport item. Then mining in the mineral rich locations - gold, diamonds. Big wars started due to religious differences - Islam vs Christianity. Slavery slowed down because in the Islam religions it is against their laws to enslave other people. Also they were losing young men they needed in their own country.

Start history at the beginning - not in the middle. The colonist were sending people all over to grow crops, then look for other products needed. Whaling for oil, cotton for clothes, ivory for all type products. The south US is crop growing, the north US is timber for ships.


Posted by Me 2
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Feb 16, 2021 at 9:17 am

Me 2 is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


Posted by Antwone Davis
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Feb 16, 2021 at 10:15 am

Antwone Davis is a registered user.

Let's just work together to resolve the issues being discussed.

Human slavery is just plain wrong and it is still being practiced today.

Many wars were fought to procure cheap human labor and access to natural resources. This too must end.

All colors are responsible for these crimes against humanity and Mother Earth but the white folks had far more to do with the exploitation.

Most African Americans do not HATE white gentile people but given the the self-serving track record of the Caucasian ethnicity throughout history, many (including Muslims and Jews) DESPISE the white race and all that they have perpetuated to ruin the world economically, politically and in the humane mistreatment of ALL people (including their own).

This will take time to eventually correct the social injustices that have plagued human society, emanating not only in America but from western Europe as well.

Full monetary reparations and formal apologies are in order before the healing process can begin.

Until then, we will continue to have social unrest. It is time for the white race to acknowledge ALL of their past wrongdoings and to make good UNLESS they are still embracing their inherent racism and ethocentric mindsets.


Posted by Jeff Brown
a resident of another community
on Feb 16, 2021 at 10:36 am

Jeff Brown is a registered user.

As noted earlier, the fact that poor white southerners who could not afford slaves of their own fought to perpetuate slavery on behalf of the plantation owners clearly shows a certain degree of inbred ignorance and bigotry.

Their ancestors live on today as further illustrated by the recent Capitol riot.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 16, 2021 at 11:10 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

History - not included in above - Franco Prussian War of 1870. France wanted to take Alsace Lorraine from Prussia because it was a major cultural and financial center - major city Strasbourg. Prussia prevailed in that war. End result is a large number of families decamped to the US, avoiding New York because of the Anti-Semitic culture. They progressed to CA because of the gold rush, CA statehood and ended up in SF. That group of families established many major businesses and cultural features that exist today. And they spread out and had people at UC, SU building and administrating many student functions (Meyer Library). Kathrine Graham (Meyer) - Personal History recounts the transitions and travels through an anti-Semitic culture and her involvement in the Washington Post. Her father bought it out of bankruptcy. Her travels to SF where a group of family members resided - her being a cub reporter on the papers.

SU is a result of the Gold Rush and building of the transcontinental rail road that created the city of SF and the great wealth that prompted the creation of the university in a location - the Farm - that was partially removed from the hustle and bustle of SF. Also a location that had geophysical features which could support major buildings. The city of PA grew up around it to provide the services typically expected to support a growing endeavor. As the area supported WW1 and WW2 the general area grew in population and types of industry. Slavery was being eliminated before CA became a state, and before PA ever existed. The whole focus of this location was the gold rush, the railroad, and the city services that supported that whole growing city.

Governor Jerry Brown in his last State of the state said his grandfather - Arnold Schuckman emigrated from Germany in 1849 and established a major stage coach business. He owns some of the land originally owned by the grandfather.


Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 16, 2021 at 12:17 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

Suggest you all look up US Foreign Aid by country. A large amount of money is being provided to African countries. Those are not our US citizens. Our US citizens are provided schools, food stamps where needed, and the opportunity to proceed at each person's level of skill, and application of interest. Read about all of the people who are fleeing in tiny boats to get to a place where they can grow, work and learn.
All who are here have made it, are in school, and have the opportunity to grow and thrive.


Posted by Alistair Kearns
a resident of Stanford
on Feb 16, 2021 at 12:58 pm

Alistair Kearns is a registered user.

@ Resident 1-Adobe Meadows

Curious. If the Franco-Prussian War took place in 1870, how did the 'end result' culminate in refugees arriving in California for the 1949 California Gold Rush?

Time machine or alternate universe?

Lastly, a lot of Jews arriving from Europe did indeed settle in New York. Ever heard of Brooklyn?

And as for U.S. aid to non-citizens in Africa, perhaps the money would be better spent towards honoring the 'forty acres and a mule' mandate by General Sherman but rescinded by President Andrew Johnson who was later impeached.

Perhaps the best settlement would be to give African Americans an existing continental U.S. state of their own.

You can suggest the state but giving them a southern state like Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, South/North Carolina, Louisiana or Texas would be a good laugh on southern white racists past and present.


Posted by Me 2
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Feb 16, 2021 at 6:17 pm

Me 2 is a registered user.

"Most African Americans do not HATE white gentile people but given the the self-serving track record of the Caucasian ethnicity throughout history, many (including Muslims and Jews) DESPISE the white race and all that they have perpetuated to ruin the world economically, politically and in the humane mistreatment of ALL people (including their own)."

Give me a break. Whoever owns the wealth and power will strive to keep it, regardless of skin color. If power arose in Africa instead of Europe, we would be talking about how oppressive dark skinned people are. Look at what happened in Rwanda. The Balkans. Turks and Kurds. Or recently Armenia and Azerbaijan. And the recent skirmishes between India and China.

This whole thread is filled with undergraduate-level ethnic studies viewpoints. So simplistic to just reduce it "caucasian race." I'm not even white and I'm appalled at the lack of critical thinking in this thread.


Posted by Tareeq Washington
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Feb 17, 2021 at 6:24 am

Tareeq Washington is a registered user.

Religion also played a major role in this pervasive racial and economic disparity.

White folks tend to embrace Judeo-Christian faiths which also embrace the dollar sign and other monetary denominations.

Indigenous people like the native Americans, Africans, Aborigines and Pacific Islanders are more spiritual in nature.

The Asians have opted to emulate Western commerce and greed and as a result, many have foresaken other spiritual religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism.

It is all about money.


Posted by S. Underwood
a resident of Crescent Park
on Feb 17, 2021 at 7:57 am

S. Underwood is a registered user.

"The Asians have opted to emulate Western commerce and greed..."

I wonder if you can you hear yourself? If only there were a word for your type of your hurtful and dangerous generalizations.


Posted by Phyllis Ketchum
a resident of Barron Park
on Feb 17, 2021 at 8:30 am

Phyllis Ketchum is a registered user.

The "emulating western commerce and greed" comment by Tareeq is not off-base and only illustrates how the economic rewards of mass manufacturing consumer goods has led to greater prosperity among certain Asian countries including post WW2 Japan, post Korean War South Korea, and at present the People's Republic of China.

Traditional spiritualism of their native religions have taken a backseat to commerce and in the PRC, the practice of religion is discouraged.

No different than in America where cash is king.


Posted by Me 2
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Feb 17, 2021 at 10:48 am

Me 2 is a registered user.

Wow. Talk about knowing just enough to be dangerous.

"Traditional spiritualism of their native religions have taken a backseat to commerce and in the PRC"

Religion was quashed by the Communist Party in China at the very beginning, as it was perceived as a threat towards allegiance to the Party.

Has nothing to do with commerce. A ridiculous assertion.

This surface level reading of history and inferring nonsense is really disheartening to see in a Palo Alto discussion board.


Posted by W. Johansen
a resident of Community Center
on Feb 17, 2021 at 12:03 pm

W. Johansen is a registered user.

Global commerce and the manufacturing of consumer goods overseas has a lot to do with America's economic woes regardless of religion.

We need to boycott goods manufactured in the PRC and start producing them ourselves again regardless of the retail costs.

Over 90% of American households own goods manufactured in the PRC because Americans as a whole are bargain hunters focused on disposable products.

Apple products are all made in the PRC along with most of the $19.95 TV specials and a majority of the stuff we purchase at various retail outlets give or take some items made in 3rd world countries where labor (aka slave labor) is also cheap.

It's time for America to reassert itself as an economic power and loyal Americans can do their part by not buying goods made in the PRC as the commerce is used to further develop their military aspirations of global dominance.

As Me2 stated, religion was phased out of Communist China a long time ago as allegiance to their cause.

Praying for miracles and false hopes during the pandemic is not going to resurrect American prowess in global and economic affairs but a stronger commitment to American manufacturing will.


Posted by [email protected]
a resident of another community
on Feb 17, 2021 at 1:21 pm

[email protected] is a registered user.

You can buy Apple iPhone clones in China.

Very reasonable, about $250.00 for a current flagship iPhone model.

IPhones are manufactured in China and after the contracted production run is completed, the subcontractors make more of them for the domestic market only. You cannot buy these bootleg models in the United States due to licensing agreements between the OEM manufacturers and Apple.

The materials, chips and OS apps are identical and already in possession of the Chinese manufacturers so it is very easy to schedule subsequent production runs.

And with billions of potential domestic customers, $250.00 per unit retail is very lucrative as the average earnings there are considerably less than in the United States.

The PRC manufacturing provinces are very adept at replicating many desirable upper tier goods including designer fashionware.

Unlike Japanese manufacturers who traditionally copy and improve various consumer goods, the Chinese simply copy what's already out there and then sell clones, a highly profitable business venture.

And the funny thing is, I am willing to wager that if fake iPhones were available for purchase in the United States, people here would buy them rather than procure them at the Apple Store because it would be far CHEAPER and most Americans love a good bargain.


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