East Palo Alto refocuses on affordable-housing program, as crisis continues | July 19, 2019 | Palo Alto Weekly | Palo Alto Online |

Palo Alto Weekly

News - July 19, 2019

East Palo Alto refocuses on affordable-housing program, as crisis continues

City hires nonprofit EPA CAN DO to administer, analyze program

by Sue Dremann

As East Palo Alto seeks to increase its stock of affordable housing, it is revitalizing its below-market-rate housing (BMR) program with the help of a longtime ally: East Palo Alto Community Alliance Development Organization (EPA CAN DO).

This story contains 542 words.

Stories older than 90 days are available only to subscribing members. Please help sustain quality local journalism by becoming a subscribing member today.

If you are already a subscriber, please log in so you can continue to enjoy unlimited access to stories and archives. Subscriptions start at $5 per month and may be cancelled at any time.

Log in     Subscribe

Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at [email protected]

Comments

14 people like this
Posted by Anon
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 19, 2019 at 9:49 am

Can we stop using the word "crisis" for every single thing? Is -everything- a "crisis"?

A "crisis" is:

- a stage in a sequence of events at which the trend of all future events, especially for better or for worse, is determined; turning point.
- a condition of instability or danger, as in social, economic, political, or international affairs, leading to a decisive change.

e.g. "Pearl Harbor"

The local housing problem has been building since ~1980. 40 years is moving on towards geologic time.


8 people like this
Posted by Bob Andersen
a resident of Barron Park
on Jul 19, 2019 at 3:10 pm

It is a crisis, “Anon”


8 people like this
Posted by Anon
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 21, 2019 at 7:39 pm

Posted by Bob Andersen, a resident of Barron Park

>> It is a crisis, “Anon”

So, let me get this straight. We add office space for 5,000 new employees, and then we add 1 unit. Then, we find some funding for a three year contract that might pay for 1 unit. We -assess- the existing 108 units. We find 12 more units. -ad nauseum- How about this? The developer adds 5,000 new jobs, the developer builds 5,000 new affordable units along with it.

>> (See sidebar, "For East Palo Alto condo, 60 would-be buyers).

>> According to a city staff report, EPA CAN DO is currently assessing the city's 108 BMR units [...] he nonprofit has already found 12 units at "high risk" after public records showed the owner might no longer live at the address or there are liens against the property for more than the restricted resale price.

I think it is -pathetic- that somebody thinks it is OK to add dozens of new units to fill the gap created with 5,000 (or whatever) new jobs. Oh, and I'm somehow supposed to feel guilty because there is no place to house all of the employees in my back yard.

-No new office space!-


9 people like this
Posted by Norman Beamer
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 22, 2019 at 4:30 pm

If there is a crisis, it is an overdevelopment of office space crisis.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Email:


Post a comment

Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

Get fact-based reporting on the COVID-19 crisis sent to your inbox daily.