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Food donations rise after implementation of new law

Santa Clara County businesses donate almost 5 million pounds of food in first half of 2022

Strawberries, peaches, lettuce, cantaloupe and other produce are boxed by Second Harvest of Silicon Valley for distribution to those in need. The nonprofit has participated in the Joint Venture Silicon Valley Food Recovery Initiative. Embarcadero Media file photo by Magali Gauthier.

A new state law allowed Santa Clara County businesses to donate almost 5 million pounds of food during the first half of 2022, according to a press release from the county.

SB 1383 took effect this year. It requires grocery stores and other businesses to donate the maximum possible amount of surplus food to decrease the amount of food that is thrown into landfills. The law not only reduces methane but also increases food security.

Businesses in Santa Clara County donated 4.9 million pounds of food through the program's managing partner, Joint Venture Silicon Valley Food Recovery Initiative, which administers the program for the county and its 15 cities, according to the news release.

Businesses outside the county donated an additional 4.1 million pounds through the program.

The food donated prevented the release of 336 metric tons of methane, according to estimates from the county.

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The law applies to grocery stores, food service providers, distributors and wholesale food vendors. Restaurants, schools, health facilities and large event venues and hotels must follow the maximum donation law starting in 2024.

Grocery stores, food service providers, distributors and wholesale food vendors must currently comply with the new regulations regarding food recovery. Restaurants, schools, health facilities, large event venues and hotels must comply starting in 2024.

"I am grateful that we are helping thousands of members of our community by increasing the amount of nutritious food that is available to residents in need," Supervisor Otto Lee said in a statement. "This program enables us to combat food insecurity and climate change at the same time, helping current and future residents of Santa Clara County."

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Food donations rise after implementation of new law

Santa Clara County businesses donate almost 5 million pounds of food in first half of 2022

by Thomas Hughes / Bay City News Service

Uploaded: Mon, Dec 12, 2022, 5:03 pm

A new state law allowed Santa Clara County businesses to donate almost 5 million pounds of food during the first half of 2022, according to a press release from the county.

SB 1383 took effect this year. It requires grocery stores and other businesses to donate the maximum possible amount of surplus food to decrease the amount of food that is thrown into landfills. The law not only reduces methane but also increases food security.

Businesses in Santa Clara County donated 4.9 million pounds of food through the program's managing partner, Joint Venture Silicon Valley Food Recovery Initiative, which administers the program for the county and its 15 cities, according to the news release.

Businesses outside the county donated an additional 4.1 million pounds through the program.

The food donated prevented the release of 336 metric tons of methane, according to estimates from the county.

The law applies to grocery stores, food service providers, distributors and wholesale food vendors. Restaurants, schools, health facilities and large event venues and hotels must follow the maximum donation law starting in 2024.

Grocery stores, food service providers, distributors and wholesale food vendors must currently comply with the new regulations regarding food recovery. Restaurants, schools, health facilities, large event venues and hotels must comply starting in 2024.

"I am grateful that we are helping thousands of members of our community by increasing the amount of nutritious food that is available to residents in need," Supervisor Otto Lee said in a statement. "This program enables us to combat food insecurity and climate change at the same time, helping current and future residents of Santa Clara County."

Comments

akaMaiNguyen
Registered user
Greenmeadow
on Dec 13, 2022 at 6:27 am
akaMaiNguyen, Greenmeadow
Registered user
on Dec 13, 2022 at 6:27 am

What a win-win for people in need and for the environment! This article also reminds me that, sometimes, laws and the bureaucracy they create have a great return on investment for all of us.


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