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Around Town: Palo Alto-raised musician in the running for two Grammys

Also, East Palo Alto Library joins pilot program and state Sen. Josh Becker brings back 'There Oughta be a Law' contest

In the latest column, news about a Palo Alto native nominated for two Grammys, the East Palo Alto Library's participation in a pilot of the Resilient Libraries Network and a chance for community members to put a new law on the books.

Molly Tuttle. Courtesy Molly Tuttle.

GRAMMY-NOMINATED NATIVE ... Palo Alto native Molly Tuttle has been nominated for two awards at the 65th Grammys, the Recording Academy announced on Nov. 15.

Tuttle grew up in a musical family in Palo Alto before going to study at the Berklee College of Music and settling in Nashville, Tennessee.

She is one of 10 musicians nominated in the Best New Artist category and one of five nominated for Best Bluegrass Album, which she shares with her band Golden Highway. Coproduced by bluegrass legend Jerry Douglas, "Crooked Tree" draws from both the roots of the genre and contemporary influences, with lyrics exploring everything from Tuttle's experience as a woman in the music industry to how the Bay Area's high cost of living drives away artists. Released on April 1 via Nonesuch Records, Tuttle and the band's first album received widespread acclaim for its varied approach and traditional sound.

After the Recording Academy announced its nominations for the 2023 Grammys, Tuttle took to Instagram to thank the Academy and "the bluegrass community who has supported me since day 1!" The Grammy Awards will take place Feb. 5 and will air live on CBS, with more details on performers and hosts yet to be announced.

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MORE THAN A LIBRARY ... The East Palo Alto Library is part of a pilot program that's exploring how libraries can serve as community centers in the face of "natural hazard-related events," according to a press release from the Bay Area Regional Energy Network, which is leading the initiative that began earlier this month.

The Bell Street location is one of six in the Bay Area that's part of the Resilient Libraries Network, in which the libraries are turned into community resilience centers prior to, during and after a hazardous event. The locations were picked based on communities most impacted by climate change. They'll be given assistance in pinpointing what energy upgrades are needed so their buildings are more efficient and able to run clean air. The pilot includes "free engineering technical assistance."

The network "models a community-driven process that is supported by robust technical assistance that will position selected communities for additional funding and opportunities to build resilience," progam manager Carolyn Yvellez said.

The pilot, a partnership with the Bay Area Climate Adaptation Network and American Society of Adaptation Professionals, lasts through the end of 2023. "The program ensures that participating libraries will have the opportunity to improve community assets and services and improve quality of life," ASAP Deputy Director Rachel Jacobson said in the release. Learn more about the program at bayren.org/resilient-libraries-network.

State Sen. Josh Becker speaks at the Climate Collaboration Summit at Gunn High School in Palo Alto on Nov. 12, 2022. He's accepting submissions for his "There Oughta be a Law" contest. Photo by Gennady Sheyner.

DRAFTING LAWS ... Looking to put a new law on the books? State Sen. Josh Becker announced a contest that will allow people to do just that.

"If you've ever said to yourself, 'There oughta be a law,' well, now is your chance to put an idea out there and get a law enacted that will change how things are done in California," he said in a press release.

Introducing bills proposed by the public is not a new idea for Becker, according to the senator's press release. "During his first two years in office, Becker has introduced bill ideas brought to him by people in the district that have been signed into law dealing with climate change, community college fees, healthcare and privacy issues."

Becker said he hopes the contest will generate more ideas with themes of climate justice and economic opportunity although other proposals are welcome, too, including repealing laws that are not working.

Becker wants the contest to create more awareness about the state's legislative process. "My goal is to show people what it's like to have an idea go from the drawing board to the legislative playing field, so they can see for themselves what it takes for an idea to actually become law," he said. The contest is open to residents of Senate District 13, which covers parts of Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.

Proposals must be submitted online and are limited to one idea per form, although multiple forms can be submitted. Becker will select the winning entry and will introduce it as a Senate bill in February.

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Around Town: Palo Alto-raised musician in the running for two Grammys

Also, East Palo Alto Library joins pilot program and state Sen. Josh Becker brings back 'There Oughta be a Law' contest

by Palo Alto Weekly staff / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Sat, Nov 26, 2022, 10:11 am

In the latest column, news about a Palo Alto native nominated for two Grammys, the East Palo Alto Library's participation in a pilot of the Resilient Libraries Network and a chance for community members to put a new law on the books.

GRAMMY-NOMINATED NATIVE ... Palo Alto native Molly Tuttle has been nominated for two awards at the 65th Grammys, the Recording Academy announced on Nov. 15.

Tuttle grew up in a musical family in Palo Alto before going to study at the Berklee College of Music and settling in Nashville, Tennessee.

She is one of 10 musicians nominated in the Best New Artist category and one of five nominated for Best Bluegrass Album, which she shares with her band Golden Highway. Coproduced by bluegrass legend Jerry Douglas, "Crooked Tree" draws from both the roots of the genre and contemporary influences, with lyrics exploring everything from Tuttle's experience as a woman in the music industry to how the Bay Area's high cost of living drives away artists. Released on April 1 via Nonesuch Records, Tuttle and the band's first album received widespread acclaim for its varied approach and traditional sound.

After the Recording Academy announced its nominations for the 2023 Grammys, Tuttle took to Instagram to thank the Academy and "the bluegrass community who has supported me since day 1!" The Grammy Awards will take place Feb. 5 and will air live on CBS, with more details on performers and hosts yet to be announced.

MORE THAN A LIBRARY ... The East Palo Alto Library is part of a pilot program that's exploring how libraries can serve as community centers in the face of "natural hazard-related events," according to a press release from the Bay Area Regional Energy Network, which is leading the initiative that began earlier this month.

The Bell Street location is one of six in the Bay Area that's part of the Resilient Libraries Network, in which the libraries are turned into community resilience centers prior to, during and after a hazardous event. The locations were picked based on communities most impacted by climate change. They'll be given assistance in pinpointing what energy upgrades are needed so their buildings are more efficient and able to run clean air. The pilot includes "free engineering technical assistance."

The network "models a community-driven process that is supported by robust technical assistance that will position selected communities for additional funding and opportunities to build resilience," progam manager Carolyn Yvellez said.

The pilot, a partnership with the Bay Area Climate Adaptation Network and American Society of Adaptation Professionals, lasts through the end of 2023. "The program ensures that participating libraries will have the opportunity to improve community assets and services and improve quality of life," ASAP Deputy Director Rachel Jacobson said in the release. Learn more about the program at bayren.org/resilient-libraries-network.

DRAFTING LAWS ... Looking to put a new law on the books? State Sen. Josh Becker announced a contest that will allow people to do just that.

"If you've ever said to yourself, 'There oughta be a law,' well, now is your chance to put an idea out there and get a law enacted that will change how things are done in California," he said in a press release.

Introducing bills proposed by the public is not a new idea for Becker, according to the senator's press release. "During his first two years in office, Becker has introduced bill ideas brought to him by people in the district that have been signed into law dealing with climate change, community college fees, healthcare and privacy issues."

Becker said he hopes the contest will generate more ideas with themes of climate justice and economic opportunity although other proposals are welcome, too, including repealing laws that are not working.

Becker wants the contest to create more awareness about the state's legislative process. "My goal is to show people what it's like to have an idea go from the drawing board to the legislative playing field, so they can see for themselves what it takes for an idea to actually become law," he said. The contest is open to residents of Senate District 13, which covers parts of Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.

Proposals must be submitted online and are limited to one idea per form, although multiple forms can be submitted. Becker will select the winning entry and will introduce it as a Senate bill in February.

Comments

Easy8
Registered user
Green Acres
on Nov 28, 2022 at 2:52 am
Easy8, Green Acres
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2022 at 2:52 am

I was interested in Molly Tuttle's roots in Palo Alto and found this very interesting story PBS did on her. Luckily, it's on youtube - link below

Web Link


Annette
Registered user
College Terrace
on Nov 28, 2022 at 6:07 am
Annette, College Terrace
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2022 at 6:07 am

Good for Ms. Tuttle! It's always a pleasure to read about someone from this area making their way in a career that is off one of the more typical Palo Alto paths. I hope she wins.

About the East Palo Alto Library story - is the photo of backed-up traffic the best in file for EPA? Surely there's a photo of the library or someplace other than what is shown!


Riley2
Registered user
Menlo Park
on Nov 28, 2022 at 11:22 am
Riley2, Menlo Park
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2022 at 11:22 am

Molly Tuttle is an absolute treasure. I remember seeing her perform in the area when she was a kid, and I was blown away by her show at the Guild in Menlo Park this year.

Best of luck to her.


sequoiadean
Registered user
Los Altos
on Nov 28, 2022 at 12:49 pm
sequoiadean, Los Altos
Registered user
on Nov 28, 2022 at 12:49 pm

That's a great feature about her from the PBS News Hour.

I was fortunate to see her (and Bob Weir) play with the Terrapin Family Band last Wednesday at the Guild Theater in Menlo Park!


Aletheia
Registered user
Greenmeadow
on Nov 29, 2022 at 10:34 am
Aletheia, Greenmeadow
Registered user
on Nov 29, 2022 at 10:34 am

Molly Tuttle is a national treasure!


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