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Mobile mental health crisis services are coming to north Santa Clara County

TRUST program brings an on-site response team to address crises without law enforcement

Santa Clara County plans to roll out mobile mental health crisis services in the northern end of the county in October 2022. Embarcadero Media file photo by Magali Gauthier.

Santa Clara County has teamed up with two mental health providers to bring sorely needed mobile mental health crisis services to Palo Alto, Mountain View and other cities in the northern and west valley areas of the county as soon as October, Supervisor Joe Simitian announced Monday.

The Trusted Response Urgent Support Team (TRUST) program, a mobile mental health crisis response team, is a partnership between the county and the nonprofit organizations Pacific Clinics and Momentum for Health. The program brings together specially trained community residents who have firsthand experience with mental health challenges, mental health workers and first aid providers who respond to crises in the community without involving law enforcement.

The program addresses concerns about the use of police to respond to mental health crises, which can sometimes result in fatal consequences, an issue that has gained attention with police shootings nationwide of individuals who are in severe mental health crisis.

"Obviously, when the police are needed, we want them there. But we've got to be smarter and more adept about getting the right kind of help to the right place in the right set of circumstances. It's not easy, but it can be done. And now we'll have the teams and tools to do it. Simply put, we're working to ensure the right response in a moment of crisis," said Simitian, chair of the county's Health and Hospital Committee.

"In a moment of crisis, folks need to feel safe when calling for help. We need to do everything we can to respond quickly and connect folks in crisis with the kind of help they need. TRUST, our county's latest mobile response program, offers a new intervention option that provides in-person support at the time of crisis that does not involve police," Simitian said.

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When the TRUST program is fully operational, community members can call the new national suicide-prevention lifeline, 988, on a 24/7 basis to access services. Calls coming from area codes 408, 669 and 650 within Santa Clara County will be directed to the county's Suicide and Crisis Services Call Center. Residents without those area codes may access the county's services by calling 800-704-0900 and pressing 1.

The call will be assessed and evaluated by clinical staff from Pacific Clinics in real time to determine if the situation can be resolved through de-escalation over the phone, or if it is necessary to dispatch in-person help.

Momentum for Health's north county location will provide in-person crisis response services, including mental and medical health assessments, stabilization and on-site resolution, and transportation to another place of service for stabilization, if needed. The team will use a specialized TRUST vehicle, which has a safe, calming and therapeutic interior environment for transportation. The vehicle's exterior is also intentionally designed to ensure that it doesn't cause additional anxiety or stress for people who need on-site assistance, according to Simitian's announcement, which was a joint statement with the two nonprofit providers.

"A mental health crisis can happen to anyone, regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, culture, education and income level. It can occur at any time," said Karen Meagher, clinical director of crisis continuum of service of Pacific Clinics. The program also provides resources for future support and a plan for those in need, she said.

Dr. Shefali Miller, chief medical officer of Momentum for Health, said TRUST aims to provide consistent mental health services resources for north county communities and help people feel safe when they reach out in need of help.

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"Having 24/7 crisis support available a phone call away, even at your doorstep if needed, provided by someone who is a mental health professional and knows how overwhelming it can feel to be in a crisis situation, is essential to resolving the situation," Miller said.

'In a moment of crisis, folks need to feel safe when calling for help. We need to do everything we can to respond quickly and connect folks in crisis with the kind of help they need.'

-Joe Simitian, supervisor, Santa Clara County

The past two years of pandemic challenges have created more anxiety and mental health issues for young people in particular, Simitian noted in April. Last year, the county's Mobile Crisis Response Team program received nearly 5,000 calls for service — 1,600 more than in 2020 — and nearly 3,800 more than in 2019. The county-operated program of mental health clinicians who work closely with law enforcement. The team is dispatched to the scene when people in crisis have mental health symptoms, particularly if they are suicidal or need an evaluation for psychiatric hospitalization. The county has expanded its mental health crisis services in response to the growing need.

Currently, someone in Santa Clara County who is experiencing a mental health crisis or their families can call the new three-digit number, 988, which is available nationwide. Their call will be promptly answered, screened and connected to the county's crisis service programs, which includes MCRT.

In April, the Board of Supervisors approved a $2 million package proposed by Simitian to fund a MCRT program expansion through 2025 that includes a four-person team based in the north county. The team has specialized training to respond to the needs of young people ages 16 to 24.

In addition, county residents can also currently access the county's Mobile Response Stabilization Service, which offers 24/7 in-person or telephone crisis counseling. The service is operated by Pacific Clinics to support children, youth, and young adults through age 21 who are in a non-life-threatening, acute psychological or emotional crisis.

Another county program, the In-Home Outreach Team, offers intensive outreach and advocacy for people who have had multiple emergency mental health service visits in the past year, recent incarceration or other high risks.

In December, the Palo Alto Police Department partnered with the county to launch a local Psychiatric Emergency Response Team. Calls for a PERT response are 911-generated and don't go through the 988 system. The program pairs a licensed mental health clinician with a law enforcement officer to respond to calls involving people in active, acute mental health crises.

Simitian, who has long advocated for additional mental health services for north county residents, is glad to see "real progress," he said.

"The need has been evident but standing up these teams has been challenging. Fortunately, there's a growing number of mental health professionals who understand the importance of crisis response," he said.

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Sue Dremann
 
Sue Dremann is a veteran journalist who joined the Palo Alto Weekly in 2001. She is a breaking news and general assignment reporter who also covers the regional environmental, health and crime beats. Read more >>

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Mobile mental health crisis services are coming to north Santa Clara County

TRUST program brings an on-site response team to address crises without law enforcement

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Tue, Jul 19, 2022, 9:37 am

Santa Clara County has teamed up with two mental health providers to bring sorely needed mobile mental health crisis services to Palo Alto, Mountain View and other cities in the northern and west valley areas of the county as soon as October, Supervisor Joe Simitian announced Monday.

The Trusted Response Urgent Support Team (TRUST) program, a mobile mental health crisis response team, is a partnership between the county and the nonprofit organizations Pacific Clinics and Momentum for Health. The program brings together specially trained community residents who have firsthand experience with mental health challenges, mental health workers and first aid providers who respond to crises in the community without involving law enforcement.

The program addresses concerns about the use of police to respond to mental health crises, which can sometimes result in fatal consequences, an issue that has gained attention with police shootings nationwide of individuals who are in severe mental health crisis.

"Obviously, when the police are needed, we want them there. But we've got to be smarter and more adept about getting the right kind of help to the right place in the right set of circumstances. It's not easy, but it can be done. And now we'll have the teams and tools to do it. Simply put, we're working to ensure the right response in a moment of crisis," said Simitian, chair of the county's Health and Hospital Committee.

"In a moment of crisis, folks need to feel safe when calling for help. We need to do everything we can to respond quickly and connect folks in crisis with the kind of help they need. TRUST, our county's latest mobile response program, offers a new intervention option that provides in-person support at the time of crisis that does not involve police," Simitian said.

When the TRUST program is fully operational, community members can call the new national suicide-prevention lifeline, 988, on a 24/7 basis to access services. Calls coming from area codes 408, 669 and 650 within Santa Clara County will be directed to the county's Suicide and Crisis Services Call Center. Residents without those area codes may access the county's services by calling 800-704-0900 and pressing 1.

The call will be assessed and evaluated by clinical staff from Pacific Clinics in real time to determine if the situation can be resolved through de-escalation over the phone, or if it is necessary to dispatch in-person help.

Momentum for Health's north county location will provide in-person crisis response services, including mental and medical health assessments, stabilization and on-site resolution, and transportation to another place of service for stabilization, if needed. The team will use a specialized TRUST vehicle, which has a safe, calming and therapeutic interior environment for transportation. The vehicle's exterior is also intentionally designed to ensure that it doesn't cause additional anxiety or stress for people who need on-site assistance, according to Simitian's announcement, which was a joint statement with the two nonprofit providers.

"A mental health crisis can happen to anyone, regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, culture, education and income level. It can occur at any time," said Karen Meagher, clinical director of crisis continuum of service of Pacific Clinics. The program also provides resources for future support and a plan for those in need, she said.

Dr. Shefali Miller, chief medical officer of Momentum for Health, said TRUST aims to provide consistent mental health services resources for north county communities and help people feel safe when they reach out in need of help.

"Having 24/7 crisis support available a phone call away, even at your doorstep if needed, provided by someone who is a mental health professional and knows how overwhelming it can feel to be in a crisis situation, is essential to resolving the situation," Miller said.

The past two years of pandemic challenges have created more anxiety and mental health issues for young people in particular, Simitian noted in April. Last year, the county's Mobile Crisis Response Team program received nearly 5,000 calls for service — 1,600 more than in 2020 — and nearly 3,800 more than in 2019. The county-operated program of mental health clinicians who work closely with law enforcement. The team is dispatched to the scene when people in crisis have mental health symptoms, particularly if they are suicidal or need an evaluation for psychiatric hospitalization. The county has expanded its mental health crisis services in response to the growing need.

Currently, someone in Santa Clara County who is experiencing a mental health crisis or their families can call the new three-digit number, 988, which is available nationwide. Their call will be promptly answered, screened and connected to the county's crisis service programs, which includes MCRT.

In April, the Board of Supervisors approved a $2 million package proposed by Simitian to fund a MCRT program expansion through 2025 that includes a four-person team based in the north county. The team has specialized training to respond to the needs of young people ages 16 to 24.

In addition, county residents can also currently access the county's Mobile Response Stabilization Service, which offers 24/7 in-person or telephone crisis counseling. The service is operated by Pacific Clinics to support children, youth, and young adults through age 21 who are in a non-life-threatening, acute psychological or emotional crisis.

Another county program, the In-Home Outreach Team, offers intensive outreach and advocacy for people who have had multiple emergency mental health service visits in the past year, recent incarceration or other high risks.

In December, the Palo Alto Police Department partnered with the county to launch a local Psychiatric Emergency Response Team. Calls for a PERT response are 911-generated and don't go through the 988 system. The program pairs a licensed mental health clinician with a law enforcement officer to respond to calls involving people in active, acute mental health crises.

Simitian, who has long advocated for additional mental health services for north county residents, is glad to see "real progress," he said.

"The need has been evident but standing up these teams has been challenging. Fortunately, there's a growing number of mental health professionals who understand the importance of crisis response," he said.

Comments

Marie
Registered user
South of Midtown
on Jul 19, 2022 at 11:04 am
Marie, South of Midtown
Registered user
on Jul 19, 2022 at 11:04 am

Thank you Supervisor Simitian. The TRUST program sounds great. I hope it will soon be 24/7 and will accept referrals from 911 calls as is done in Eugene OR with their highly successful CAHOOTS program. When needed, police are called. In 2021, out of 18,106 responses by CAHOOTS, only 301 required additional help from the Eugene police department. Just google CAHOOTS Eugene OR to see the statistics. Let's save our police for the far more important work they are trained for and let mental health professionals do the job they are trained for.


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