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The Palo Alto City Council demanded details on revised police policies. Here's what the agency had to say.

Department adopts requirements for documentation of verbal counseling, stronger policy on officers identifying themselves prior to use of force

In a June 2022 memo, the Palo Alto Police Department . Embarcadero Media file photo.

Responding to a recent audit, the Palo Alto Police Department has revised various policies pertaining to internal investigations, canine deployments and interviews of witnesses following incidents involving police force or officer misconduct.

The department disclosed the revisions earlier this month in a memo released by acting Police Chief Andrew Binder. The memo details the department's response to 19 recommendations that the city's independent police auditor, OIR Group, issued earlier this year after reviewing all incidents that involved Taser deployments, use of force and complaints against the department between July 2020 and December 2021.

Binder's memo, which details numerous policy revisions, in itself represents a shift for the department. Discussions between the auditor and department leaders have historically occurred away from the public eye and then were summarized in the audit report. At a March hearing, however, the City Council directed the Police Department to start offering these responses in writing. The new memo is the first such written response.

While the cases reviewed by the auditor pertain to 16 incidents involving public complaints, use of force or internal disputes, it devotes particular attention to the attack on Joel Alejo, a Mountain View resident who was sleeping in a shed while Palo Alto and Mountain View police were searching the neighborhood for a kidnapping suspect. Video from the incident shows Palo Alto Police Officer Nick Enberg entering the shed with his police dog and directing the dog to repeatedly bite Alejo as he is lying on the ground. After handcuffing him, police determine that he is not the person they are looking for.

In January, the council approved a $135,000 settlement with Alejo.

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The auditor's review of the case indicated Palo Alto's policy for using canines doesn't provide enough guidance and too much discretion to the canine handlers, Stephen Connolly of the OIR Group told the council during a March discussion.

"Canine trainers were trained to sort of use the canines the best way they knew how. That sometimes works but sometimes doesn't work. And in this case, the department realized there was a need to tighten up the policy," Connolly said at the March 14 meeting.

According to Binder's memo, the department revised its policy manual to "expressly reflect the Department's existing expectation for officers to identify themselves prior to the use of force," which was not done in this case. The department also agreed with the auditor's recommendation that the agency adopt a "modified warning" for K-9 officers to identify as such when formal announcements are not practical.

This recommendation, Binder wrote, has been "addressed in the policy manual."

The updated policy manual, which the department published in May, states that a "clearly audible warning to announce that a canine will be released if the person does not surrender shall be made prior to each entry, deployment, or release of the canine.

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"When a search involves entering multiple distinct properties, a warning should precede each such entry. The mere presence of a police canine can be an effective tool for facilitating the peaceful surrender of a suspect," the manual states.

Other revisions to the manual address the auditor's recommendations that the department make it a policy to interview officers from other agencies who are witnesses to an incident and that the city try to obtain body-worn camera footage from these officers when possible. In the Alejo case, Mountain View officers accompanied Palo Alto officers into the shed and Mountain View subsequently released camera footage of the incident from numerous angles.

OIR Group also took issue with Palo Alto's failure to talk to Alejo once he hired an attorney to handle his claim against the city. Binder's memo states that Palo Alto agreed with this recommendation and has "revised its administrative procedures to ensure that administrative investigators attempt to interview civilian victims and witnesses, even when represented by counsel and if no interview occurs, provide an explanation as to why."

Other changes were implemented through issuances of department memoranda or new procedures. In one case, officers who were investigating a traffic accident arrested one of the drivers after concluding that he was under the influence of marijuana, which they discovered in his vehicle. The district attorney declined to pursue any charges, however, because the officers had failed to obtain a blood sample from the driver.

The auditor had recommended that the department provide verbal counseling to the two officers about their failure to obtain a blood draw but, according to its report, saw no evidence in the file that any counseling had occurred.

According to Binder's memo, the department has since issued an Administrative Investigation Disposition memorandum that documents departmental action taken as part of an administrative investigation.

"This memorandum is provided to the involved officer and retained in the administrative case file once the investigation has been completed," Binder wrote.

The department also has revised its administrative procedures to ensure that two investigators are assigned for key interviews during internal affairs investigations of staff. This was in response to an incident in which an officer was found to have violated department policy when his girlfriend used the department's criminal record database to query her name while riding along with him. In reviewing the incident, a supervisor viewed body-camera footage in which the officer alludes to recent use of illegal drugs at a party, according to the audit.

While the department ultimately could not prove the drug use, the auditors had some issues with how the case was handled. Though the audit found that the officer's statements "strain credulity in several self-serving ways," the interview with him was short and conducted by a single supervisor who accepted the explanations at face value.

The audit recommends that in future investigations, at least two people be assigned as "questioners" to increase "the likelihood that all relevant ground will be covered and that appropriate follow-up questions will get asked."

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Gennady Sheyner
 
Gennady Sheyner covers the City Hall beat in Palo Alto as well as regional politics, with a special focus on housing and transportation. Before joining the Palo Alto Weekly/PaloAltoOnline.com in 2008, he covered breaking news and local politics for the Waterbury Republican-American, a daily newspaper in Connecticut. Read more >>

Follow Palo Alto Online and the Palo Alto Weekly on Twitter @paloaltoweekly, Facebook and on Instagram @paloaltoonline for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

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The Palo Alto City Council demanded details on revised police policies. Here's what the agency had to say.

Department adopts requirements for documentation of verbal counseling, stronger policy on officers identifying themselves prior to use of force

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Jun 29, 2022, 11:41 am

Responding to a recent audit, the Palo Alto Police Department has revised various policies pertaining to internal investigations, canine deployments and interviews of witnesses following incidents involving police force or officer misconduct.

The department disclosed the revisions earlier this month in a memo released by acting Police Chief Andrew Binder. The memo details the department's response to 19 recommendations that the city's independent police auditor, OIR Group, issued earlier this year after reviewing all incidents that involved Taser deployments, use of force and complaints against the department between July 2020 and December 2021.

Binder's memo, which details numerous policy revisions, in itself represents a shift for the department. Discussions between the auditor and department leaders have historically occurred away from the public eye and then were summarized in the audit report. At a March hearing, however, the City Council directed the Police Department to start offering these responses in writing. The new memo is the first such written response.

While the cases reviewed by the auditor pertain to 16 incidents involving public complaints, use of force or internal disputes, it devotes particular attention to the attack on Joel Alejo, a Mountain View resident who was sleeping in a shed while Palo Alto and Mountain View police were searching the neighborhood for a kidnapping suspect. Video from the incident shows Palo Alto Police Officer Nick Enberg entering the shed with his police dog and directing the dog to repeatedly bite Alejo as he is lying on the ground. After handcuffing him, police determine that he is not the person they are looking for.

In January, the council approved a $135,000 settlement with Alejo.

The auditor's review of the case indicated Palo Alto's policy for using canines doesn't provide enough guidance and too much discretion to the canine handlers, Stephen Connolly of the OIR Group told the council during a March discussion.

"Canine trainers were trained to sort of use the canines the best way they knew how. That sometimes works but sometimes doesn't work. And in this case, the department realized there was a need to tighten up the policy," Connolly said at the March 14 meeting.

According to Binder's memo, the department revised its policy manual to "expressly reflect the Department's existing expectation for officers to identify themselves prior to the use of force," which was not done in this case. The department also agreed with the auditor's recommendation that the agency adopt a "modified warning" for K-9 officers to identify as such when formal announcements are not practical.

This recommendation, Binder wrote, has been "addressed in the policy manual."

The updated policy manual, which the department published in May, states that a "clearly audible warning to announce that a canine will be released if the person does not surrender shall be made prior to each entry, deployment, or release of the canine.

"When a search involves entering multiple distinct properties, a warning should precede each such entry. The mere presence of a police canine can be an effective tool for facilitating the peaceful surrender of a suspect," the manual states.

Other revisions to the manual address the auditor's recommendations that the department make it a policy to interview officers from other agencies who are witnesses to an incident and that the city try to obtain body-worn camera footage from these officers when possible. In the Alejo case, Mountain View officers accompanied Palo Alto officers into the shed and Mountain View subsequently released camera footage of the incident from numerous angles.

OIR Group also took issue with Palo Alto's failure to talk to Alejo once he hired an attorney to handle his claim against the city. Binder's memo states that Palo Alto agreed with this recommendation and has "revised its administrative procedures to ensure that administrative investigators attempt to interview civilian victims and witnesses, even when represented by counsel and if no interview occurs, provide an explanation as to why."

Other changes were implemented through issuances of department memoranda or new procedures. In one case, officers who were investigating a traffic accident arrested one of the drivers after concluding that he was under the influence of marijuana, which they discovered in his vehicle. The district attorney declined to pursue any charges, however, because the officers had failed to obtain a blood sample from the driver.

The auditor had recommended that the department provide verbal counseling to the two officers about their failure to obtain a blood draw but, according to its report, saw no evidence in the file that any counseling had occurred.

According to Binder's memo, the department has since issued an Administrative Investigation Disposition memorandum that documents departmental action taken as part of an administrative investigation.

"This memorandum is provided to the involved officer and retained in the administrative case file once the investigation has been completed," Binder wrote.

The department also has revised its administrative procedures to ensure that two investigators are assigned for key interviews during internal affairs investigations of staff. This was in response to an incident in which an officer was found to have violated department policy when his girlfriend used the department's criminal record database to query her name while riding along with him. In reviewing the incident, a supervisor viewed body-camera footage in which the officer alludes to recent use of illegal drugs at a party, according to the audit.

While the department ultimately could not prove the drug use, the auditors had some issues with how the case was handled. Though the audit found that the officer's statements "strain credulity in several self-serving ways," the interview with him was short and conducted by a single supervisor who accepted the explanations at face value.

The audit recommends that in future investigations, at least two people be assigned as "questioners" to increase "the likelihood that all relevant ground will be covered and that appropriate follow-up questions will get asked."

Comments

felix
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 29, 2022 at 11:13 pm
felix, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 29, 2022 at 11:13 pm

Another excellent improvement instituted by Council for the PAPD toward better policing and accountability.


Chris
Registered user
Charleston Meadows
on Jul 1, 2022 at 9:38 am
Chris, Charleston Meadows
Registered user
on Jul 1, 2022 at 9:38 am

I'll take a few dog bites for 136k


GTSpencer
Registered user
Midtown
on Jul 2, 2022 at 7:31 pm
GTSpencer, Midtown
Registered user
on Jul 2, 2022 at 7:31 pm

Why would anyone want to work for this liberal city. Cops will leave and no new ones will come. Good luck protecting yourself.


Darin Long
Registered user
Greenmeadow
on Jul 3, 2022 at 8:10 am
Darin Long, Greenmeadow
Registered user
on Jul 3, 2022 at 8:10 am

The PAPD should be setting a more positive example for others to follow as there is no room left for hypocracy, lack of departmental transparency, and incomplete investigations pertaining to officer misconduct.

The K-9 Corps should also be disbanded if their handlers are incapable of using police dogs properly.


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