News

Editorial: Our election recommendations

A voter fills out their ballot at the Palo Alto Art Center in Palo Alto on Nov. 3, 2020. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

With California's open primary rules, established when voters approved Prop. 14 in 2010, the top two vote-getters in all partisan races, regardless of party affiliation, will face off in the November general election. For non-partisan county offices such as district attorney, sheriff and assessor, however, there won't be a runoff in November if one candidate receives more than 50% of the vote in the primary.

For Palo Alto voters, that means there will automatically be a runoff election In November for the congressional seat held by Democrat Anna Eshoo and the state Assembly seat held by Democrat Marc Berman, and it's highly likely in the Santa Clara County sheriff's race, where four major candidates are running with no incumbent.

In the county district attorney and assessor races, it is likely that incumbents Jeff Rosen and Larry Stone will exceed the 50% mark.

We are concerned that two incumbents, Congresswoman Anna Eshoo and County Assessor Larry Stone, have been in office for 30 and 27 years respectively. These two have been reelected by overwhelming margins over the years because they are competent, hardworking and have served their constituents well. They are all but assured of being reelected again this year, in part because their continued service discourages others from running because of the advantages of incumbency, especially in fundraising.

But at ages 79 and 81, they should be creating opportunities and encouraging new candidates to follow in their footsteps and allow a new generation of leaders to represent us. If reelected, we hope that each will announce after the election their intention to retire when their new terms end so that there is plenty of time for good and diverse candidates, including women and people of color, to step forward to run for these important positions.

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In the neighboring congressional district to the north, Rep. Jackie Speier is retiring at age 71 after serving for a distinguished 20 years in Washington. Her decision should serve as a model for others who are inclined to hang on to their offices, unconstrained by term limits.

For non-partisan offices such as sheriff, district attorney and assessor, we would strongly support the adoption of term limits that cap those officials' tenures to four, four-year terms.

Congress — Anna Eshoo and Ajwang Rading

Incumbent Rep. Anna Eshoo and Ajwang Rading, an attorney at the Palo Alto-based firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, are among the candidates vying to represent Congressional District 16 in the 2022 election. Photo of Eshoo by Magali Gauthier. Rading photo courtesy of the candidate.

As noted above, Anna Eshoo has been one of the most popular and successful elected officials ever to serve this region. In 14 reelection campaigns since her initial election in 1992, she has never faced a serious challenge. That is a tribute both to her excellent service and attentiveness to her constituents and the close alignment of her views with her Democratic district.

This year, perhaps because of an increasing belief that it may be time for her to step aside, or that she will do so in two years, Eshoo has seven challengers — three Republicans, three Democrats and an independent. With Eshoo almost certainly set to be the top vote-getter, the second-place finisher who will compete against her in November could get as little as 15% to 20% of the vote in the primary depending on how evenly spread out the voting is.

We hope Eshoo's opponent in November is Ajwang Rading, a Democrat and attorney at the Palo Alto-based firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati who has sparked a strong local following in support of his first bid for public office. Rading, 30, embraces a liberal Democratic platform that revolves around issues of social justice, climate change and universal health care.

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A former staff member for U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, Rading's background includes a stint at the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative, the national organization founded by Bryan Stevenson. Rading, who is Black, was born in poverty in Los Angeles and says his childhood included spending nights in a 2001 Dodge Neon with his single mom, who immigrated from Kenya. He went on to graduate from college and law school at UCLA. He believes his upbringing and background would make him an effective advocate for boosting affordable housing, tackling income inequality in District 16 and championing other progressive issues.

His message and youthfulness is not unlike those of Silicon Valley Congressman Ro Khanna, 45, a progressive Democrat who was elected in 2016 on his second try to unseat eight-term incumbent Democrat Mike Honda. In four years, Khanna has become a prominent member of the progressive wing of the party.

The other leading candidates in the race are Rishi Kumar, a tech executive who serves on the Saratoga City Council and who lost to Eshoo two years ago with 37% of the vote, and Peter Ohtaki, a Republican who served eight years on the Menlo Park City Council, is a financial executive for a tech firm, and ran unsuccessfully against Marc Berman in the 2020 Assembly race.

A general election campaign between Eshoo and Rading would be an inspiring match-up between an accomplished representative nearing the end of her career who has paved the way for countless other women to seek higher office and an idealistic and passionate young man of color just starting his political journey.

Kevin Jensen. Courtesy Kevin Jensen.

Santa Clara County Sheriff — Kevin Jensen

Facing a unanimous vote of no confidence last year by the Board of Supervisors, mounting investigations and possible removal from office, Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith spared herself almost certain defeat this year by choosing not to run for a seventh term. So the good news is that a much-maligned and poorly managed Sheriff's department will finally have a new leader.

The sheriff oversees a budget of more than $188 million and 711 staff members (and an additional 1,080 staff and $200.6 million for the Department of Corrections).

Four major candidates, including Palo Alto Police Chief Bob Jonsen, a retired county Sheriff's Office captain and two current sergeants, are vying for the seat. Jonsen's primary appeal is that he has the administrative experience of having led both the Menlo Park and Palo Alto police departments.

Jonsen, 59, was police chief in Menlo Park for five years until being hired by Palo Alto in 2018. Jonsen may be a good administrator, but his consistent lack of transparency regarding police misconduct and routine police policy matters has cast a shadow on his ability to innovate and reform. Actions speak louder than words, and Jonsen has not shown the leadership that will be needed within the Sheriff's Office.

Former sheriff's captain and assistant chief of the Department of Corrections, Kevin Jensen, 58, retired in 2013 after 29 years with the Sheriff's Office. He ran unsuccessfully against Smith in 2014 and has since been doing law enforcement consulting, including training new recruits and managers. The two sergeants are Sean Allen, 51, a 32-year veteran, and Christine Nagaye, 50, who has been with the department for 20 years.

We recommend Kevin Jensen, who has had the benefit of rising through the ranks over 30 years in the sheriff's office but the perspective of his consulting work and being away from the troubled department for the last eight years. As a high-ranking administrator in the department who was willing to run against his boss and challenge her record, Jensen was not one who sat back and toed Smith's line.

During his tenure he was the liaison to the Stanford Department of Public Safety, county jail administration commander, court security division commander and administrative coroner. He was also the risk and information-sharing program manager for the Urban Area Security Initiative and was tasked with terrorism prevention, mitigation, response and recovery for the 12-county Bay Area region. In late 2012, he served as the initiative's statewide risk-program manager.

He has the support of the Santa Clara County Deputy Sheriffs' Association, Santa Clara County Correctional Peace Officers' Association, and multiple fire and police groups and individuals, including retired Palo Alto police Chief Dennis Burns.

He is best suited to take on the task of rebuilding the department and restoring the public's confidence in its operations. He sees an urgent need to reform the culture of the organization, a view that makes his support from the two unions all the more important.

The next sheriff will face a monumental challenge to improve transparency, accountability and communication after Smith's years of mismanagement. Jensen is clearly the best qualified candidate to succeed.

Santa Clara County District Attorney — Jeff Rosen

Jeff Rosen. Courtesy Jeff Ronsen.

The county district attorney's office has over 600 employees and almost 200 attorneys, making it California's largest DA's office north of Los Angeles.

Jeff Rosen, 54, has served three terms as district attorney and ran unopposed in the last two elections, making this election the first time he has had to defend his record in a campaign. He has cultivated a reputation as a reformer, jumping at opportunities to be visibly associated with popular progressive initiatives to step up prosecutions of sexual assault, increase the use of diversion programs to reduce the number of offenders in jail, reduce prosecutions in cases that create racial inequities and engage in more public outreach and education about the criminal justice system.

He is being challenged by two progressive candidates who don't think Rosen has gone far enough to implement reforms that recognize the vulnerability of the poor and people of color in the criminal justice system and is too focused on traditional models of incarceration.

Sajid Khan, 39, a public defender for the last 14 years, says he is the "true progressive" in the race and has focused on how racism permeates the system, the importance of ending the money bail system, not ever trying juveniles as adults and increasing diversion programs as an alternative to incarceration. His support of probation for Brock Turner, reflecting his belief that justice should be empathetic and not be measured by jail time, drew sharp criticism last year after Khan posted on social media about his concern for the survivors of sexual assault and the secondary trauma they suffer by the legal system.

Rosen's other opponent, is a prosecutor who was demoted and then fired by Rosen after writing an opinion piece in the Mercury News criticizing progressive prosecutors who would seek short sentences for violent crimes. Daniel Chung, 33, is now suing the county and seeking to unseat his former boss at the ballot box. He said criminal justice reforms are creating a revolving door for repeat offenders and the department's "hot potato" method of handling cases, by which cases get handled by multiple DAs, has led to long delays and is a disservice to crime victims.

In spite of these criticisms, Jeff Rosen has modernized the operation of the DA's office and implemented many important reforms. His greatest accomplishment may be the diversification of his prosecutors so they better reflect the community. Half the attorneys are women and more than 40% are people of color or LGBTQ individuals. He has implemented numerous programs to divert non-violent offenders from jail, especially in drug cases, supported reclassifying minor drug crimes from felonies to misdemeanors and created a conviction integrity unit to investigate innocence claims.

We hope Rosen's next term will bring more attention to police misconduct, which cries out for stronger prosecutorial attention. The police and district attorney's office must work hand in hand to bring criminals to justice, but that relationship cannot result in the type of laissez faire attitude toward prosecuting police misconduct that Rosen has shown.

Santa Clara County Assessor — Larry Stone

Larry Stone. Courtesy Santa Clara County.

Larry Stone has been in office for 27 years, and at age 81 it is time for him to step aside and allow someone of his caliber to take his place. Unfortunately, his name recognition and strong performance in the office has made it impossible for any challenger to mount a serious challenge as long as he chooses to continue in office.

This year is no exception. His opponent, Andrew Crockett, is a CPA working as a financial analyst for the Santa Clara County Health System and doesn't come close to measuring up to Stone's experience or accomplishments.

We recommend Stone's reelection, with the hope that he will then announce it is his last term.

Measure A — Water Board term limit

A 2.25-million-gallon metal holding tank at the Silicon Valley Advanced Water Purification Center in San Jose. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Measure A is a ridiculous and deceptive attempt by the incumbent directors of the Santa Clara Valley Water District to change the current three-term limit of 12 years in office to give themselves an additional four years to serve. Voters imposed a limit of three terms on directors in 2009 and now that some directors are about to be termed out they have placed Measure A on the ballot to change the limit to four terms (16 years).

This is an easy one. Vote no on Measure A.

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Editorial: Our election recommendations

by Palo Alto Weekly editorial board / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Thu, May 12, 2022, 9:42 am

With California's open primary rules, established when voters approved Prop. 14 in 2010, the top two vote-getters in all partisan races, regardless of party affiliation, will face off in the November general election. For non-partisan county offices such as district attorney, sheriff and assessor, however, there won't be a runoff in November if one candidate receives more than 50% of the vote in the primary.

For Palo Alto voters, that means there will automatically be a runoff election In November for the congressional seat held by Democrat Anna Eshoo and the state Assembly seat held by Democrat Marc Berman, and it's highly likely in the Santa Clara County sheriff's race, where four major candidates are running with no incumbent.

In the county district attorney and assessor races, it is likely that incumbents Jeff Rosen and Larry Stone will exceed the 50% mark.

We are concerned that two incumbents, Congresswoman Anna Eshoo and County Assessor Larry Stone, have been in office for 30 and 27 years respectively. These two have been reelected by overwhelming margins over the years because they are competent, hardworking and have served their constituents well. They are all but assured of being reelected again this year, in part because their continued service discourages others from running because of the advantages of incumbency, especially in fundraising.

But at ages 79 and 81, they should be creating opportunities and encouraging new candidates to follow in their footsteps and allow a new generation of leaders to represent us. If reelected, we hope that each will announce after the election their intention to retire when their new terms end so that there is plenty of time for good and diverse candidates, including women and people of color, to step forward to run for these important positions.

In the neighboring congressional district to the north, Rep. Jackie Speier is retiring at age 71 after serving for a distinguished 20 years in Washington. Her decision should serve as a model for others who are inclined to hang on to their offices, unconstrained by term limits.

For non-partisan offices such as sheriff, district attorney and assessor, we would strongly support the adoption of term limits that cap those officials' tenures to four, four-year terms.

As noted above, Anna Eshoo has been one of the most popular and successful elected officials ever to serve this region. In 14 reelection campaigns since her initial election in 1992, she has never faced a serious challenge. That is a tribute both to her excellent service and attentiveness to her constituents and the close alignment of her views with her Democratic district.

This year, perhaps because of an increasing belief that it may be time for her to step aside, or that she will do so in two years, Eshoo has seven challengers — three Republicans, three Democrats and an independent. With Eshoo almost certainly set to be the top vote-getter, the second-place finisher who will compete against her in November could get as little as 15% to 20% of the vote in the primary depending on how evenly spread out the voting is.

We hope Eshoo's opponent in November is Ajwang Rading, a Democrat and attorney at the Palo Alto-based firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati who has sparked a strong local following in support of his first bid for public office. Rading, 30, embraces a liberal Democratic platform that revolves around issues of social justice, climate change and universal health care.

A former staff member for U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, Rading's background includes a stint at the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative, the national organization founded by Bryan Stevenson. Rading, who is Black, was born in poverty in Los Angeles and says his childhood included spending nights in a 2001 Dodge Neon with his single mom, who immigrated from Kenya. He went on to graduate from college and law school at UCLA. He believes his upbringing and background would make him an effective advocate for boosting affordable housing, tackling income inequality in District 16 and championing other progressive issues.

His message and youthfulness is not unlike those of Silicon Valley Congressman Ro Khanna, 45, a progressive Democrat who was elected in 2016 on his second try to unseat eight-term incumbent Democrat Mike Honda. In four years, Khanna has become a prominent member of the progressive wing of the party.

The other leading candidates in the race are Rishi Kumar, a tech executive who serves on the Saratoga City Council and who lost to Eshoo two years ago with 37% of the vote, and Peter Ohtaki, a Republican who served eight years on the Menlo Park City Council, is a financial executive for a tech firm, and ran unsuccessfully against Marc Berman in the 2020 Assembly race.

A general election campaign between Eshoo and Rading would be an inspiring match-up between an accomplished representative nearing the end of her career who has paved the way for countless other women to seek higher office and an idealistic and passionate young man of color just starting his political journey.

Facing a unanimous vote of no confidence last year by the Board of Supervisors, mounting investigations and possible removal from office, Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith spared herself almost certain defeat this year by choosing not to run for a seventh term. So the good news is that a much-maligned and poorly managed Sheriff's department will finally have a new leader.

The sheriff oversees a budget of more than $188 million and 711 staff members (and an additional 1,080 staff and $200.6 million for the Department of Corrections).

Four major candidates, including Palo Alto Police Chief Bob Jonsen, a retired county Sheriff's Office captain and two current sergeants, are vying for the seat. Jonsen's primary appeal is that he has the administrative experience of having led both the Menlo Park and Palo Alto police departments.

Jonsen, 59, was police chief in Menlo Park for five years until being hired by Palo Alto in 2018. Jonsen may be a good administrator, but his consistent lack of transparency regarding police misconduct and routine police policy matters has cast a shadow on his ability to innovate and reform. Actions speak louder than words, and Jonsen has not shown the leadership that will be needed within the Sheriff's Office.

Former sheriff's captain and assistant chief of the Department of Corrections, Kevin Jensen, 58, retired in 2013 after 29 years with the Sheriff's Office. He ran unsuccessfully against Smith in 2014 and has since been doing law enforcement consulting, including training new recruits and managers. The two sergeants are Sean Allen, 51, a 32-year veteran, and Christine Nagaye, 50, who has been with the department for 20 years.

We recommend Kevin Jensen, who has had the benefit of rising through the ranks over 30 years in the sheriff's office but the perspective of his consulting work and being away from the troubled department for the last eight years. As a high-ranking administrator in the department who was willing to run against his boss and challenge her record, Jensen was not one who sat back and toed Smith's line.

During his tenure he was the liaison to the Stanford Department of Public Safety, county jail administration commander, court security division commander and administrative coroner. He was also the risk and information-sharing program manager for the Urban Area Security Initiative and was tasked with terrorism prevention, mitigation, response and recovery for the 12-county Bay Area region. In late 2012, he served as the initiative's statewide risk-program manager.

He has the support of the Santa Clara County Deputy Sheriffs' Association, Santa Clara County Correctional Peace Officers' Association, and multiple fire and police groups and individuals, including retired Palo Alto police Chief Dennis Burns.

He is best suited to take on the task of rebuilding the department and restoring the public's confidence in its operations. He sees an urgent need to reform the culture of the organization, a view that makes his support from the two unions all the more important.

The next sheriff will face a monumental challenge to improve transparency, accountability and communication after Smith's years of mismanagement. Jensen is clearly the best qualified candidate to succeed.

The county district attorney's office has over 600 employees and almost 200 attorneys, making it California's largest DA's office north of Los Angeles.

Jeff Rosen, 54, has served three terms as district attorney and ran unopposed in the last two elections, making this election the first time he has had to defend his record in a campaign. He has cultivated a reputation as a reformer, jumping at opportunities to be visibly associated with popular progressive initiatives to step up prosecutions of sexual assault, increase the use of diversion programs to reduce the number of offenders in jail, reduce prosecutions in cases that create racial inequities and engage in more public outreach and education about the criminal justice system.

He is being challenged by two progressive candidates who don't think Rosen has gone far enough to implement reforms that recognize the vulnerability of the poor and people of color in the criminal justice system and is too focused on traditional models of incarceration.

Sajid Khan, 39, a public defender for the last 14 years, says he is the "true progressive" in the race and has focused on how racism permeates the system, the importance of ending the money bail system, not ever trying juveniles as adults and increasing diversion programs as an alternative to incarceration. His support of probation for Brock Turner, reflecting his belief that justice should be empathetic and not be measured by jail time, drew sharp criticism last year after Khan posted on social media about his concern for the survivors of sexual assault and the secondary trauma they suffer by the legal system.

Rosen's other opponent, is a prosecutor who was demoted and then fired by Rosen after writing an opinion piece in the Mercury News criticizing progressive prosecutors who would seek short sentences for violent crimes. Daniel Chung, 33, is now suing the county and seeking to unseat his former boss at the ballot box. He said criminal justice reforms are creating a revolving door for repeat offenders and the department's "hot potato" method of handling cases, by which cases get handled by multiple DAs, has led to long delays and is a disservice to crime victims.

In spite of these criticisms, Jeff Rosen has modernized the operation of the DA's office and implemented many important reforms. His greatest accomplishment may be the diversification of his prosecutors so they better reflect the community. Half the attorneys are women and more than 40% are people of color or LGBTQ individuals. He has implemented numerous programs to divert non-violent offenders from jail, especially in drug cases, supported reclassifying minor drug crimes from felonies to misdemeanors and created a conviction integrity unit to investigate innocence claims.

We hope Rosen's next term will bring more attention to police misconduct, which cries out for stronger prosecutorial attention. The police and district attorney's office must work hand in hand to bring criminals to justice, but that relationship cannot result in the type of laissez faire attitude toward prosecuting police misconduct that Rosen has shown.

Larry Stone has been in office for 27 years, and at age 81 it is time for him to step aside and allow someone of his caliber to take his place. Unfortunately, his name recognition and strong performance in the office has made it impossible for any challenger to mount a serious challenge as long as he chooses to continue in office.

This year is no exception. His opponent, Andrew Crockett, is a CPA working as a financial analyst for the Santa Clara County Health System and doesn't come close to measuring up to Stone's experience or accomplishments.

We recommend Stone's reelection, with the hope that he will then announce it is his last term.

Measure A is a ridiculous and deceptive attempt by the incumbent directors of the Santa Clara Valley Water District to change the current three-term limit of 12 years in office to give themselves an additional four years to serve. Voters imposed a limit of three terms on directors in 2009 and now that some directors are about to be termed out they have placed Measure A on the ballot to change the limit to four terms (16 years).

This is an easy one. Vote no on Measure A.

Comments

Palo Alto Mom
Registered user
Crescent Park
on May 12, 2022 at 11:11 am
Palo Alto Mom, Crescent Park
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 11:11 am

Thank you to the Weekly for your endorsement of Ajwang Rading! He is a breath of fresh air that brings much-needed energy, new ideas, and a deep commitment and sense of urgency to issues of our climate crisis, affordable housing, healthcare reform, and social justice. His life/work experiences are invaluable and he has proven in this campaign that he connects with and motivates people of all ages and backgrounds. He has quite a following of first-time voting high school students in the district who have been door knocking and spreading the word about his candidacy at farmers markets. Anna has sat very comfortably in her seat for almost 3 decades now which is just too long for anyone, no matter how popular. I wholeheartedly agree with the Weekly, that it's time for her to "be creating opportunities and encouraging new candidates to follow in their footsteps and allow a new generation of leaders to represent us." And may I add, especially now that such an outstanding candidate like Ajwang is in the field!! #timeforchange


J Smith
Registered user
Mountain View
on May 12, 2022 at 12:17 pm
J Smith, Mountain View
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 12:17 pm

As a longtime Anna voter, I agree with this article. Her years of dedicated service have been a cornerstone to our community but it is time to share the wealth of knowledge and experience to tackle new issues.

When I first heard of Ajwang discussing the most important issues during the League of Woman Voters discussion I was deeply impressed and inspired. He gives me hope for the future of our country! I am looking forward to seeing more from him!


Consider Your Options.
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 12, 2022 at 12:19 pm
Consider Your Options. , Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 12:19 pm

Experience matters...a LOT in Washington. I met Mr. Rading, a smart, warm young man with healthy values and deep life experience that informs a compassionate nature. He graduated from law school a couple of years ago and lacks political experience. Mr. Rading, please start at a city, county or state level. Learn the ropes. Learn how to build coalitions. Build relationships. Learn the process. Without these skills, they will eat you alive in Washington. I see in you a man I could vote for once you have more experience.

Mr. Kumar, the tone of the campaign materials I have received from you has been hostile, disrespectful and dismissive of U.S. Rep Eshoo's long and distinguished service. Your claims are ripe with hyperbole. That is not what I expect from a congressional representative. Your campaign conduct should be representative of how you plan to conduct yourself in Washington. You also lack the kind of government leadership experience that matters in Washington. I am also curious about which analytics software company you serve as an executive. We need better regulation of big tech, and I would like to know who you serve in this arena. Your professional affiliation seems to have been wiped from your internet presence.

Rep. Eshoo, thank you for your service. I probably will vote for you again this one last time because I appreciate your experience and contributions. Please use this term to cultivate talented young people to replace you. It is time for that.


HopefulThinker
Registered user
University South
on May 12, 2022 at 12:31 pm
HopefulThinker, University South
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 12:31 pm

My wife and I have supported Anna Eshoo for decades. We are very fond of her. However, about two months ago, we were out for a walk with our dog together, and we notice Ajwang canvassing door to door. We slowed to watch what Ajwang was doing at one particular door and to see if the person was receptive. After what felt like a 5-minute conversation that we could barely make out, Ajwang turns back toward the sidewalk and immediately approaches us, 'Hello, my name is Ajwang, and I'm running for Congress, what issues do you care most about?' At first, I was embarrassed that we were caught staring but I felt nothing but Clinton-esque empathy from this young man.

It's an understatement to say we were floored by his overall presentation and intellect. I tried to throw a curveball policy question but of course, Ajwang answered in extraordinary detail. When I asked him if he were a lefty or centrist, he gave the perfect response: "a pragmatist."

As we walked home, my wife, who I would consider a lifelong Eshoo acolyte, said something I never thought I would hear: "I love Anna but I think I'm going to vote for Ajwang."

As a Palo Alto native, Ajwang represents something we haven't felt in a very long time... hope.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 12, 2022 at 1:13 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 1:13 pm

A person does not run for Congress that has never been in an election before or participated in city, state, or local processes. That is an overreach. A person has to get out there and prove themselves before they choose to run for a federal office. How nice he is, or has good talking points is fine. But not my choice for a federal office in DC. That is like stacking the deck with unknowns. Seems to be a problem in this year.

The former mayor of Menlo Park has a proven track record of moving his city along to accomplish the established goals of this state.


Palo Alto Native
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on May 12, 2022 at 1:20 pm
Palo Alto Native, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 1:20 pm

I'm thrilled that PA Online endorses Mr. Rading. He is a formidable young man with great, compassion, energy, experience and intellect. His unique perspective on public policy will really help this district. BTW, he has stronger experience than most in federal politics, having worked as a legislative aide to Sen. Booker. He knows the ins and outs of debating, amending, and passing legislation perhaps better than anybody in this race.

Though Anna has been a faithful servant of our district, I have questions about her connections to Big Pharma and why drug prices here are so darn high. I think there is a correlation between the two. Also, her lack of urgency when it comes to climate changes and other pressing issues is a little unsettling. 30+ years is too much and undemocratic. It's due time for a change.


HopefulThinker
Registered user
University South
on May 12, 2022 at 3:18 pm
HopefulThinker, University South
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 3:18 pm

Do you know what office Bill Clinton first ran for? At the age of 27, he ran for the House of Representatives in Arkansas. Even though he was unsuccessful, you what Bill Clinton then ran for? Arkansas' Attorney General! And he won! While I think most agree that its nice to have experience, to your statement:

"A person does not run for Congress that has never been in an election before or participated in city, state, or local processes. That is an overreach."

We should ask a former President what he thinks. I see Ajwang in that light, with similar expertise and impact at a similar age. He will likely accomplish big things for this District with his new thinking!


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on May 12, 2022 at 5:51 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 5:51 pm

I feel bad for the residents of SCC if "soft on crime" Rosen wins again. Crime rates rise with soft on crime prosecution. If you've ever wondered if that's part of the reason crime in Palo Alto has gotten worse, the answer is yes. Criminal justice reforms are creating a revolving door for repeat offenders. Most people are more concerned about the victims, and we refuse to coddle criminals.


SRB
Registered user
Mountain View
on May 12, 2022 at 7:08 pm
SRB, Mountain View
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 7:08 pm

100% agree with recommendation on the Water District's Measure A: a very easy NO.

And shame on our local rep -Gary Kremen- for putting that deceiving and self serving measure on the ballot .... -wasting over $3M in the process-.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 12, 2022 at 7:33 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 7:33 pm

What we all have seen is what people say during an election is not necessarily what you get when they are in office. What in part is required is the vetting of the individuals. As noted above some claims by individuals as to experience cannot be proved by any actual documentation as to facts.

Note that Cory Booker - aka Spartacus - represents his senate area of New Jersey. He has been relatively quiet of late. Our Congressional District is very different and has a lot of complexities regarding Hi-Tech issues which are not relative to other state issues. We need congressional representation which directly affects what we are doing here in CA. This congressional district is about us and our issues. We need people who totally understand what this congressional district is dealing with and problems we are trying to solve.


KarlWolff
Registered user
Portola Valley
on May 13, 2022 at 8:45 am
KarlWolff, Portola Valley
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 8:45 am

Another Dem lawyer (that worked for Booker) is the last thing we need...


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 13, 2022 at 7:23 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 7:23 pm

the person they are recommending - Mr. Rading is 30 years old. Given the history that was presented in the Voter's book by Mr. Rading I do not see any relevance to the very complicated Silicon Valley complications which are swirling in the news these days. This specific congressional district has problems which are unique to the state of CA and this congressional area. We need people who are grounded in the business and legal environment we live in - and are well known to us to solve the problems we are encountering here. We are here to protect our direct environment - not solve other state goals and aspirations.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 14, 2022 at 12:25 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 14, 2022 at 12:25 pm

Here is a recommendation for the City of Palo Alto. Have the Mayor position be voted on by the residents of the city.

We have a percentage of residents who want to capitalize on this cities name by feeding information out to the national press so we can say we - the city - thought the idea up. Always pushing to get notoriety. And most of the residents do not agree with these ideas and do not appreciate the grandstanding for political advancement.

Have the Mayor candidates state what their goals are which are measurable. We need to know up front what the goals are and what they plan on achieving. And if they start sliding sideways down a different path then they are out the door.

WE have too many different ideas of what the city is responsible for - some want a sociology class project here to show how woke they are. That is not running a city.
Time to have the residents decide who the mayor is from the candidates that want to run.


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