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Eshoo faces rivals from left, right and center in bid to retain Congress seat

Seven candidates hope to replace veteran politician to represent Silicon Valley district

Candidates for Congressional District 16 participate in a forum sponsored by League of Women Voters on May 3, 2022. The participating candidates are John Fredrich (top row, second from right), Richard Fox (top row, far right), Benjamin Solomon (center row, far left), Rep. Anna Eshoo (center row, second from left), Greg Tanaka (center row, second from right), Peter Ohtaki (bottom row, left) and Ajwang Rading (bottom row, right). Screenshot from Zoom.

The seven candidates vying to replace U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo in a newly redrawn Silicon Valley congressional district know they face an uphill climb.

Since she was first elected in 1992, Eshoo has been cruising to reelection in the heavily Democratic district, routinely picking up about 70% of the vote. California's switch to a top-two primary has barely blunted her political fortunes. Two years ago, she picked up 63% of the vote in the general election against fellow Democrat Rishi Kumar.

Kumar, a tech executive who serves on the Saratoga City Council, is hoping for better luck this time around. He one of seven candidates hoping to replace Eshoo in the new District 16, which stretches along the coast from Pacifica to northern San Jose and which encompasses large sections of San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, including the cities of Palo Alto, Mountain View, Woodside, Portola Valley and portions of Menlo Park and Atherton.

On Tuesday night, Eshoo and six of her challengers tried to make a case for their respective candidacies at a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters (Kumar was the only candidate who did not participate in the event). While Eshoo recalled her recent accomplishments in the House of Representatives, each of her opponents made the case that it's time for a change and that they are the best option for representing the dynamic Silicon Valley district.

Among the challengers was Palo Alto City Council member Greg Tanaka, a Democrat who over the years has stood out on the council for repeatedly voting against the city budget and, more recently, for his staunch opposition to the city's proposed business tax. A fiscal conservative whose jeremiads about the decline of innovation in Silicon Valley have been a staple of council meetings, he rejected on Tuesday the idea of voting along a party line.

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"There's this kind of red team versus blue team idea, where the red team can't vote for a blue team idea and vice versa," Tanaka said. "What we really should be doing is rather than each elected official voting for their party, you should vote for the best idea."

Ajwang Rading, an attorney at the Palo Alto-based firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, is also vying to represent the district. Unlike Tanaka or Kumar, who opposes Sacramento's housing mandates and who pledges not to increase taxes, Rading leans blue all the way. He embraces an ambitious Democratic platform that revolves around issues of social justice, climate change and universal health care.

A former staff member for U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, Rading's resume includes a stint at the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative and his political idols include the late Rep. John Lewis, who championed voting rights. Rading grew up homeless and recalled on Tuesday a childhood that involved spending nights in a 2001 Dodge Neon alongside his single mom. He believes his upbringing and background would make him an effective advocate for boosting affordable housing, tackling income inequality in District 16 and championing other progressive issues.

"I believe the upcoming primary and general election ahead will be a referendum on reproductive rights, equality and climate action," Rading said. "We should question how we got here and ensure we get a new kind of leadership that takes the actions necessary."

Eshoo is also facing a challenge from the right, with three Republicans hoping to win a seat in the heavily Democratic district. The most politically moderate of the three is former Menlo Park Mayor Peter Ohtaki, whose campaign calls for resisting unfunded housing mandates, fighting inflation and seeking more federal dollars for transportation projects. Ohtaki, who grew up in Menlo Park and spent eight years on the council, said his experience as both an elected official and as a chief financial officer at a tech firm make him well qualified for the seat.

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"Voters want a credible alternative in the November election this year, not just another shade of blue," Ohtaki said.

The two other Republicans in the race position themselves further on the right of the political spectrum. Richard Fox, who leans libertarian and who has been a vocal opponent of vaccine mandates, is characterizing his candidacy as a battle not only against Eshoo but also against President Joe Biden's Chief Medical Advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci and the pharmaceutical industry.

Benjamin Solomon is running as a pro-business candidate who wants to lower taxes. He also has, however, embraced in his campaign the national Republican Party's opposition to "critical race theory," an intellectual movement that emphasizes the role of race in shaping American institutions such as criminal justice and education. And like Fox, he is a skeptic when it comes to climate change. When asked about the topic on Tuesday, Fox suggested that government-funded research "usually reaches conclusions that the government wants it to reach," while Solomon rejected the international consensus about the threats of climate change and suggested that "global alarmist scientists" are not telling people the full truth.

The only candidate on the list who is not affiliated with either major party is John Karl Fredrich, a Palo Alto resident and retired government teacher who had made several unsuccessful bids for the City Council, most recently in 2016. Fredrich supports the "Medicare for All" plan, is skeptical about American military intervention and wants to abolish the Electoral College and pass the Equal Rights Amendment, which was introduced in 1923 but never ratified. The act aims to guarantee equal rights to all Americans, regardless of sex.

"It's long overdue, it needs to get done and I would hope to be a party to pushing that across the finish line," Fredrich said.

In making the case for a fresh term Tuesday, Eshoo touted her decades of experience, a quality that she said is particularly vital at a time when women's reproductive rights are being threatened by the Supreme Court and when the nation faces ongoing challenges such as climate change, inflation and a war in Ukraine that requires American leadership to defeat authoritarianism.

The political veteran also cited the legislation that she has championed and supported over the years, including her efforts to expand health care access for Americans. These efforts helped get an additional 6 million Americans enrolled in the Affordable Care Act in the past year, she said. Eshoo has also sponsored and supported the Women's Health Protection Act, which would prevent government restrictions on abortion access.

"I take a backseat to no one on health care, the progress that we made and for the progress that we need to make, including on the price of drugs, the price of insulin," said Eshoo, who chairs the House's Subcommittee on Health.

Her challengers, meanwhile, focused on outstanding issues that remain unresolved and argued that the district is due for a change. Tanaka and all three Republican candidates cited inflation as a major concern. He touted his experience as a tech entrepreneur and suggested that the district needs a "legislator for the digital age."

The difference between candidates was particularly apparent when it came to climate change policies. Kumar's plan centers on carbon capture technology while Tanaka champions nuclear energy. Eshoo and Rading, who both called climate change an "existential crisis," favor the more mainstream solution of ramping up investment in renewable energy, while Ohtaki talked about the need of boosting transit services and cutting emissions from transportation.

Eshoo pointed to her support for Build Back Better, a legislative package that included $555 billion in funding for climate change programs and that passed the House before petering out in the Senate. Rading said he wants to form a "climate innovation hub" that brings together communities and stakeholders from academia, the private sector and activist organizations to create innovative solutions and develop financing mechanisms to enable broad adoption.

"Climate change is still an issue reserved for wealthiest communities, and we need to conceptualize how to spread these ideas for the rest of the world," Rading said.

The candidates also took dramatically different positions when it came to regulations of tech firms. Eshoo, Fredrich and Rading all said Tuesday that they support the Digital Services Act, a legislative proposal spearheaded by the European Union that governs disinformation and that would require tech firms such as Meta and Google to provide more transparency about their algorithms.

Fox and Solomon said they agreed with Elon Musk, the billionaire who is now in the process of buying Twitter and who famously prefers a more hands-off approach when it comes to speech on the internet.

Ohtaki, meanwhile, said he supports stronger laws around privacy protection but is concerned about a situation where "the government is placed in the role of deciding what is misinformation or illegal information." Eshoo had no such reservations and said she was proud of the legislation that she had authored on both misinformation and privacy. Last year, she joined U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren in reintroducing the Online Privacy Act, which strengthens user data rights (the bill is currently going through the committee process in the House).

"We see the damage that is done to our democracy relative to disinformation, misinformation and the lack of privacy," she said.

The eight candidates will face off in the primary on June 7, with the top two vote-getters advancing to the Nov. 8 general election.

Watch the full forum:

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Gennady Sheyner
 
Gennady Sheyner covers the City Hall beat in Palo Alto as well as regional politics, with a special focus on housing and transportation. Before joining the Palo Alto Weekly/PaloAltoOnline.com in 2008, he covered breaking news and local politics for the Waterbury Republican-American, a daily newspaper in Connecticut. Read more >>

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Eshoo faces rivals from left, right and center in bid to retain Congress seat

Seven candidates hope to replace veteran politician to represent Silicon Valley district

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, May 4, 2022, 9:28 am

The seven candidates vying to replace U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo in a newly redrawn Silicon Valley congressional district know they face an uphill climb.

Since she was first elected in 1992, Eshoo has been cruising to reelection in the heavily Democratic district, routinely picking up about 70% of the vote. California's switch to a top-two primary has barely blunted her political fortunes. Two years ago, she picked up 63% of the vote in the general election against fellow Democrat Rishi Kumar.

Kumar, a tech executive who serves on the Saratoga City Council, is hoping for better luck this time around. He one of seven candidates hoping to replace Eshoo in the new District 16, which stretches along the coast from Pacifica to northern San Jose and which encompasses large sections of San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, including the cities of Palo Alto, Mountain View, Woodside, Portola Valley and portions of Menlo Park and Atherton.

On Tuesday night, Eshoo and six of her challengers tried to make a case for their respective candidacies at a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters (Kumar was the only candidate who did not participate in the event). While Eshoo recalled her recent accomplishments in the House of Representatives, each of her opponents made the case that it's time for a change and that they are the best option for representing the dynamic Silicon Valley district.

Among the challengers was Palo Alto City Council member Greg Tanaka, a Democrat who over the years has stood out on the council for repeatedly voting against the city budget and, more recently, for his staunch opposition to the city's proposed business tax. A fiscal conservative whose jeremiads about the decline of innovation in Silicon Valley have been a staple of council meetings, he rejected on Tuesday the idea of voting along a party line.

"There's this kind of red team versus blue team idea, where the red team can't vote for a blue team idea and vice versa," Tanaka said. "What we really should be doing is rather than each elected official voting for their party, you should vote for the best idea."

Ajwang Rading, an attorney at the Palo Alto-based firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, is also vying to represent the district. Unlike Tanaka or Kumar, who opposes Sacramento's housing mandates and who pledges not to increase taxes, Rading leans blue all the way. He embraces an ambitious Democratic platform that revolves around issues of social justice, climate change and universal health care.

A former staff member for U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, Rading's resume includes a stint at the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative and his political idols include the late Rep. John Lewis, who championed voting rights. Rading grew up homeless and recalled on Tuesday a childhood that involved spending nights in a 2001 Dodge Neon alongside his single mom. He believes his upbringing and background would make him an effective advocate for boosting affordable housing, tackling income inequality in District 16 and championing other progressive issues.

"I believe the upcoming primary and general election ahead will be a referendum on reproductive rights, equality and climate action," Rading said. "We should question how we got here and ensure we get a new kind of leadership that takes the actions necessary."

Eshoo is also facing a challenge from the right, with three Republicans hoping to win a seat in the heavily Democratic district. The most politically moderate of the three is former Menlo Park Mayor Peter Ohtaki, whose campaign calls for resisting unfunded housing mandates, fighting inflation and seeking more federal dollars for transportation projects. Ohtaki, who grew up in Menlo Park and spent eight years on the council, said his experience as both an elected official and as a chief financial officer at a tech firm make him well qualified for the seat.

"Voters want a credible alternative in the November election this year, not just another shade of blue," Ohtaki said.

The two other Republicans in the race position themselves further on the right of the political spectrum. Richard Fox, who leans libertarian and who has been a vocal opponent of vaccine mandates, is characterizing his candidacy as a battle not only against Eshoo but also against President Joe Biden's Chief Medical Advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci and the pharmaceutical industry.

Benjamin Solomon is running as a pro-business candidate who wants to lower taxes. He also has, however, embraced in his campaign the national Republican Party's opposition to "critical race theory," an intellectual movement that emphasizes the role of race in shaping American institutions such as criminal justice and education. And like Fox, he is a skeptic when it comes to climate change. When asked about the topic on Tuesday, Fox suggested that government-funded research "usually reaches conclusions that the government wants it to reach," while Solomon rejected the international consensus about the threats of climate change and suggested that "global alarmist scientists" are not telling people the full truth.

The only candidate on the list who is not affiliated with either major party is John Karl Fredrich, a Palo Alto resident and retired government teacher who had made several unsuccessful bids for the City Council, most recently in 2016. Fredrich supports the "Medicare for All" plan, is skeptical about American military intervention and wants to abolish the Electoral College and pass the Equal Rights Amendment, which was introduced in 1923 but never ratified. The act aims to guarantee equal rights to all Americans, regardless of sex.

"It's long overdue, it needs to get done and I would hope to be a party to pushing that across the finish line," Fredrich said.

In making the case for a fresh term Tuesday, Eshoo touted her decades of experience, a quality that she said is particularly vital at a time when women's reproductive rights are being threatened by the Supreme Court and when the nation faces ongoing challenges such as climate change, inflation and a war in Ukraine that requires American leadership to defeat authoritarianism.

The political veteran also cited the legislation that she has championed and supported over the years, including her efforts to expand health care access for Americans. These efforts helped get an additional 6 million Americans enrolled in the Affordable Care Act in the past year, she said. Eshoo has also sponsored and supported the Women's Health Protection Act, which would prevent government restrictions on abortion access.

"I take a backseat to no one on health care, the progress that we made and for the progress that we need to make, including on the price of drugs, the price of insulin," said Eshoo, who chairs the House's Subcommittee on Health.

Her challengers, meanwhile, focused on outstanding issues that remain unresolved and argued that the district is due for a change. Tanaka and all three Republican candidates cited inflation as a major concern. He touted his experience as a tech entrepreneur and suggested that the district needs a "legislator for the digital age."

The difference between candidates was particularly apparent when it came to climate change policies. Kumar's plan centers on carbon capture technology while Tanaka champions nuclear energy. Eshoo and Rading, who both called climate change an "existential crisis," favor the more mainstream solution of ramping up investment in renewable energy, while Ohtaki talked about the need of boosting transit services and cutting emissions from transportation.

Eshoo pointed to her support for Build Back Better, a legislative package that included $555 billion in funding for climate change programs and that passed the House before petering out in the Senate. Rading said he wants to form a "climate innovation hub" that brings together communities and stakeholders from academia, the private sector and activist organizations to create innovative solutions and develop financing mechanisms to enable broad adoption.

"Climate change is still an issue reserved for wealthiest communities, and we need to conceptualize how to spread these ideas for the rest of the world," Rading said.

The candidates also took dramatically different positions when it came to regulations of tech firms. Eshoo, Fredrich and Rading all said Tuesday that they support the Digital Services Act, a legislative proposal spearheaded by the European Union that governs disinformation and that would require tech firms such as Meta and Google to provide more transparency about their algorithms.

Fox and Solomon said they agreed with Elon Musk, the billionaire who is now in the process of buying Twitter and who famously prefers a more hands-off approach when it comes to speech on the internet.

Ohtaki, meanwhile, said he supports stronger laws around privacy protection but is concerned about a situation where "the government is placed in the role of deciding what is misinformation or illegal information." Eshoo had no such reservations and said she was proud of the legislation that she had authored on both misinformation and privacy. Last year, she joined U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren in reintroducing the Online Privacy Act, which strengthens user data rights (the bill is currently going through the committee process in the House).

"We see the damage that is done to our democracy relative to disinformation, misinformation and the lack of privacy," she said.

The eight candidates will face off in the primary on June 7, with the top two vote-getters advancing to the Nov. 8 general election.

Watch the full forum:

Comments

Claude Ezran
Registered user
Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on May 4, 2022 at 10:51 am
Claude Ezran, Leland Manor/Garland Drive
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 10:51 am

I am enthusiastically voting for Anna Eshoo! She has a strong track record of getting important things done in Congress, she is highly competent, politically aligned with the majority of her constituents on key issues, and she has represented our district very well. We are really lucky to have her as our representative. The other candidates seem to be either far right extremists, DINOs (Democrat In Name Only), or lightweights.


SRB
Registered user
Mountain View
on May 4, 2022 at 10:58 am
SRB, Mountain View
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 10:58 am

If Tanaka really wanted to transcend parties, why is he identifying as a Democrat?


Citizen
Registered user
College Terrace
on May 4, 2022 at 10:58 am
Citizen , College Terrace
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 10:58 am

Ajwang Rading is a socialist, based on his views and policy proposals: healthcare and housing as human rights.

Eshoo herself has turned very left - promoting universal healthcare and voting to have taxpayers fund abortions, Federalize elections, and for the PRO Act, to force employees to join unions rather than have a right to work at a unionized workplace without joining a union.


Old teacher
Registered user
Community Center
on May 4, 2022 at 11:25 am
Old teacher, Community Center
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 11:25 am

I am an ardent fan of Anna Eshoo! In the recent years since my husband's death, she has "saved" me by getting my husband's pension for me and by restoring me to Medicare! Both times, I had only to present my case to her office. We need her stature as a senior member of congress. In this critical time, she needs no "learning" or adjustment. I don't trust many of her challengers who are possibly just more conservative votes like Kysten Sinema or Joe Manchin. Her age should not be an impediment: she is open to new ideas but has the experience and judgment to know what works!


Evergreen Park Observer
Registered user
Evergreen Park
on May 4, 2022 at 11:59 am
Evergreen Park Observer, Evergreen Park
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 11:59 am

Greg Tanaka is well known as being one of the least prepared council members at City Council meetings. He is also well known for getting much of his financial support from developers and real estate interests. Of course he is opposed to a business tax in Palo Alto. He is also opposed to businesses paying their own way in other respects. I don't care which party he says he is aligned with. Look at his votes and policies.


What Will They Do Next
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on May 4, 2022 at 12:16 pm
What Will They Do Next, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 12:16 pm

Anna Eshoo has never authored any significant legislation during her tenure in Congress. Time to move on with some new blood and in particular a moderate conservative would be ideal and give California a a voice other than that of progressive liberals.


Anne
Registered user
Midtown
on May 4, 2022 at 12:54 pm
Anne, Midtown
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 12:54 pm

I'm firmly in your corner Anna. You've always done a fantastic job representing my district.

I detest Kumar's attack ads. It takes more than photos taken while wearing American flag clothing to sway sophisticated Peninsula voters.

Tanaka has demonstrated that he has no capacity for compromise or common sense. As mentioned above he is firmly in the pocket of developers.


Midtown resident
Registered user
Midtown
on May 4, 2022 at 12:55 pm
Midtown resident, Midtown
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 12:55 pm

Very sorry I missed this. Kudos to the League of Women Voters -- next time, distribute flyers! I agree that new blood would be nice (I'm one of these people lobbying for an age limit in Washington). On the other hand, "lightweight" is the word for the liberal alternatives to Eshoo. "Lightweight" and down-and-out childhood or techie success is still "lightweight" for current purposes, as far as I'm concerned. It's too bad, since we really need a push for carbon capture technologies and nuclear power rather than, e.g., those same old ideas that as a species we can learn to be better behaved vis-a-vis nature, consume less, and coexist peacefully, without massive disincentives to do otherwise that only a nondemocratic government could push through.


Anonymous complaint?
Registered user
Stanford
on May 4, 2022 at 5:38 pm
Anonymous complaint?, Stanford
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 5:38 pm

I missed this last night too.

I've voted for Eshoo every time. However, at her last town hall I attended, she got a bit lost... so sad she's 80 years old this year.

I hope one of the other candidates can fill her shoes.


felix
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 4, 2022 at 5:47 pm
felix, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 5:47 pm

Tanaka?
His positive contributions to Palo Alto City Council discussions and decisions are as rare as Pileated Woodpeckers.
In US Congress? No no no no no.


Petra Karenter
Registered user
Professorville
on May 4, 2022 at 6:13 pm
Petra Karenter, Professorville
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 6:13 pm

Do you like your inflation? Well, you can thank your Congresswoman Anna Eshoo who has been spending money like a drunken sailor for the past two years.

Monetary fact of life: overpump the system with money and you get inflation.

Over the past 30 years, sometimes I’ve voted for her, and sometimes against. But not this year. She’ll be 80 soon. Although she’s not as cognitively challenged as Mr. Biden, it’s time for some fresh blood.


peppered
Registered user
Community Center
on May 4, 2022 at 7:11 pm
peppered, Community Center
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 7:11 pm

What Tanaka did on the City Council is just disgusting -- too much developer $.
Kumar is overly ambitious.
Rading is far too left wing.
The others... hmmm.

Sticking with Eshoo.


Citizen
Registered user
Midtown
on May 4, 2022 at 9:06 pm
Citizen, Midtown
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 9:06 pm

Ajwang Rading speaks to everyone as their equal. The times I have spoken with him, he has been extremely down-to-earth, willing to listen and hear my ideas about what changes this district needs. His background also makes him uniquely qualified. He has my support.


KJTG
Registered user
Barron Park
on May 4, 2022 at 9:24 pm
KJTG, Barron Park
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 9:24 pm

Please take a closer look at Ajwang Rading, his is a centrist, moderate campaign.


Palo Alto Mom
Registered user
Crescent Park
on May 4, 2022 at 9:53 pm
Palo Alto Mom, Crescent Park
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 9:53 pm

I am thoroughly impressed and excited about Ajwang Rading. He is a breath of fresh air with wisdom and experience way beyond his lived years. He has a sense of urgency when it comes to climate action that should be a must for all of us in any candidate we support. And he inspires and motivates our youth and has quite a following of first time voters who are enthusiastically campaigning for him. Ajwang gives me hope on so many levels and I can’t wait to vote for him. Anna has been fine but 30 years is enough; this is not a kingdom. This is Silicon Valley and it’s beyond time for fresh leadership & new bold ideas.


rose with a thorn
Registered user
Mountain View
on May 4, 2022 at 10:30 pm
rose with a thorn, Mountain View
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 10:30 pm

It's incredible to me people are ok with the same person representing a district for THIRTY years. Look how much the world has changed—the crises and challenges now facing us require different thinking, more courage, more urgency, and certainly a lot less 'comfort with one's own power and status quo' than what Ms. Eshoo has given us to date.

As for the other candidates, it is true that most of them do not enjoy the same level of influence that the incumbent has built over the years. I don't pretend to have the secret sauce for running (I admire those who do go for it!), but I welcome fresh voices. I would respectfully disagree with those who call Rading, for example, as "too far left" and a "socialist" (once again the term is completely misused). What's so uncool about someone who cares about climate change, the less privileged, housing and equitable healthcare? Of all the candidates in this event, I found him to be the most empathic and genuinely caring.

Let's see what happens in the primary. I'm still deciding who to vote for but it will not be the "safe incumbent choice." We the voters need to look past our fears and demand more from our representatives.


Ward Vercruysse
Registered user
Portola Valley
on May 4, 2022 at 11:23 pm
Ward Vercruysse, Portola Valley
Registered user
on May 4, 2022 at 11:23 pm

Funny how people with strong negative opinions post anonymous.
I voted consistently for Anna and I appreciate the work she did, however I think it is time for a change. It is a sad state of affairs that the democratic leadership in general is aging and did not prepare their succession.
I like Ajwang. Yes he doesn't have many years of experience yet, but I believe that is better than having too many. There is nothing lightweight about Ajwang and I am at a loss on why some label him as 'far left'.
He experienced first hand both extreme life styles in silicon valley, he cares about people, he is well-informed on the many big issues we have today, he has fresh ideas and he truly inspires.
We need more Ajwangs.


Neighbor
Registered user
Mayfield
on May 5, 2022 at 12:42 am
Neighbor, Mayfield
Registered user
on May 5, 2022 at 12:42 am

A couple of points I want to throw out there -- I'm a Stanford student and have to say that from what I can tell, Ajwang Rading is very much a centrist and holds plenty of cross-partisan values worth noting. Rather than taking a generic politician approach, he is bringing a new, innovative, and 21st-century approach to the table. So rather than playing old politics (that we're all simply tired of), he takes a centrist approach that tackles all the right issues facing us today.


Nonsense
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 5, 2022 at 12:01 pm
Nonsense, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 5, 2022 at 12:01 pm

[Post removed; political signs may legally be placed on public property 90 days prior to an election and must be removed after the election.]


Michelle Preacher
Registered user
Palo Verde
on May 5, 2022 at 12:49 pm
Michelle Preacher, Palo Verde
Registered user
on May 5, 2022 at 12:49 pm

LOL @Nonesense. Whose campaign are you with? Look, I have voted for Anna Eshoo for the last 20 years since I moved to this area but your comments attacking an extraordinary young person trying to serve the public is below what this community is all about. What makes you say he doesn't have "roots" in the community? Sure sounds like a dog whistle. Have you met him? About three weeks ago, I met Ajwang briefly when walking with my husband as he was door-knocking and was blown away that someone as kind and warm as him wanted to go through the ugliness that you are throwing.

I have been thinking I would vote for Anna one last time out of respect for her service but now these comments disparaging Ajwang and trying to label him as one thing or another speak to the fear that this may actually be a candidate worth looking at.

P.S. for those calling him a lightweight, take a look here: Web Link


J Smith
Registered user
Mountain View
on May 5, 2022 at 7:32 pm
J Smith, Mountain View
Registered user
on May 5, 2022 at 7:32 pm

Thank you to the League of Women Voters for hosting! As a long time voter for Congresswoman Eshoo, I originally only attended to hear her perspective on some of these issues. But I found the whole event extremely informative!

I was surprised to see how many challengers were unprepared or didn’t have substantive policy suggestions. I was however really impressed with the responses by Ajwang Rading. He actually gave substantive and pragmatic answers to all the policy questions.

I hope it is Mr. Rading and Congresswoman Eshoo on the ballot in November. They are by far the best candidates and further discussions between them would promote even better policies to benefit us all. For that reason I’ll be voting for Mr. Rading in the primary. Let’s see if he can keep my vote in November. This race is definitely one I’ll be watching closely!


Matt B
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on May 7, 2022 at 8:30 am
Matt B, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 7, 2022 at 8:30 am

Anna Eshoo has done [30] years in Congress and has done a great job. But [30] years in a seat is too long. In the heartland of disruption, we need fresh points of view.

If Ms Eshoo does not win, I hope she will pass on everything she s learnt during those [30] years to whoever wins.

I am rooting for Ajwan. So Talented, big brain, big heart, radical honesty and courage, and what a personal story.


Pat Markevitch
Registered user
Downtown North
on May 7, 2022 at 8:08 pm
Pat Markevitch, Downtown North
Registered user
on May 7, 2022 at 8:08 pm

A previous poster suggested age limits. No, we need term limits in all branches and offices of government. As for this particular race: ABT, Anybody But Tanaka. He brings no substance to council meetings and will only "log in" a protest statement after a vote. Pathetic.


Rebecca Eisenberg
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on May 8, 2022 at 12:29 am
Rebecca Eisenberg, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 8, 2022 at 12:29 am

I strongly agree with Pat Markevitch's statement that it is not *age* limits we need, but rather we need *term* limits. We need them in national, state, *and* local offices.

Strong term limits are one of the simplest means to assure equal participation in govt by women and underrepresented minorities, and age limits (assuming constitutional), unfairly harm women - who, now more than ever, deserve equal opportunity to lead. Due to economic and cultural roadblocks that women face more often than men, women often cannot enter professional and political spheres until later in life, so are often unable to run as the youthful candidates that are more commonly male. Plus, women tend to stay healthy longer, and live longer overall. An age limit would disparately impact women at the very time that women's rights are severely under attack.

What is disappointing about this race is that the only woman in it is the one who has held the job for 30 years. This could have been avoided had Representative Ashoo worked on succession planning (something that Rep Speier, disappointingly, did not do either) to ensure that a female successor could follow - an impossibility in this election.

So obviously my feelings are mixed.

That said, of the men in the race, I lean towards Mr. Rading, with two concerns. First is his job at Wilson Sonsini, a firm that defends corporate misdeeds and furthers the wealth divide (this is my experience with Wilson, having worked across the table from them for 30 years).

My second hesitation about Mr. Rading is his virtual silence about abortion. We urgently need candidates, regardless of gender, to CLEARLY state that abortion is healthcare and is a human right; that they will enact the ERA and the Abortion Access Act, and that women are ALWAYS more valuable than foetuses. Our current leaders - both parties - have let us down, and we rely on new voices to protect our daughters, and their daughters, from govt control of their bodies. Full stop.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 8, 2022 at 8:28 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 8, 2022 at 8:28 am

You have Anna Eshoo competing with a newcomer to the United States legislative process in your dialog above. Peter Ohtaki, former mayor of Menlo Park is a more realistic candidate as he is experienced in dealing with the state of CA and it's legislative complexities.

If you read the profiles submitted by the individuals in the Voter Guide then people portraying Ajwang need to understand that he has worked for a legal group that is invested in activist activities. How you all think about your candidates and portray them needs to be consistent with what they have said in their own political profiles.


Michelle Preacher
Registered user
Palo Verde
on May 8, 2022 at 1:56 pm
Michelle Preacher, Palo Verde
Registered user
on May 8, 2022 at 1:56 pm

I'm sorry but you are seriously saying Peter Ohtaki is more experienced than Ajwang? No offense to the former Republican major but that's just not true. Ajwang's experience of writing federal legislation for Cory Booker or him working in the U.S. attorney's office or for that "legal group that is invested in activist activities" (LOL), which happens to be the Equal Justice Initiative and for BRYAN STEVENSON, or helping homeless veterans get their benefits -- what are you talking about? Just because Anna Eshoo recruited Peter to enter into the race to knock out her Democratic opponents does not make him a good choice. Peter has lost a handful of times and this will be no different.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 8, 2022 at 8:07 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 8, 2022 at 8:07 pm

Ajwang was based in Los Angeles at UCLA. Why didn't he choose to run in the city where he was established? Because he would not get elected in Los Angeles - no name recognition. Just another frog in a large frog pond. So he gets imported up to NorCal because Anna looks like an easy person to push aside? Still no name recognition. If he was writing for Booker why not run in Booker's state?

People are just being moved around to where the "Party" wants to stage changes. We are a different size frog pond. That says nothing for what he is going to do for us. This city and area seems to be a target for the whims of the "party". We must look like a group of pushovers.

The SFC is roasting Feinstein now - busy roasting it's own. Sorry - not a very good advertisement for the Party.


Annette
Registered user
College Terrace
on May 10, 2022 at 10:32 pm
Annette, College Terrace
Registered user
on May 10, 2022 at 10:32 pm
Annette
Registered user
College Terrace
on May 10, 2022 at 10:37 pm
Annette, College Terrace
Registered user
on May 10, 2022 at 10:37 pm

It is time for a change.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 11, 2022 at 11:43 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 11, 2022 at 11:43 am

Drive up El Camino in Menlo Park. What do you see? Extensive building that was started pre-covid. They are meeting their goals for housing in a very big way - and it looks great. Menlo Park is the home base for FB - working with a top tech company and all working well pre-covid. Are you saying that the Mayor had nothing to do with this? That is insulting.

Regardless of the R vs D the state requirements are the same for what ever party you are in. And they have met the goals of the state. They are effectively moving forward. I am seeing positive accomplishments and solid results. If a person is producing positive results in this specific area then that is all to the good. Thank you to the former mayor of Menlo Park stepping up to the plate - Peter Ohtaki. Great job, and good management.


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