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Study: Thousands of students have experienced housing instability in San Mateo County

Stanford research finds students affected were disproportionately Latinx, Black and English language learners

A Stanford study found students in the Ravenswood City School District made up a significant number of San Mateo County's population of children who've experienced housing insecurity. Embarcadero photo by Veronica Weber.

More than 2,600 students in school districts throughout San Mateo County experienced housing instability over a recent three-year period, according to a Stanford study. Some 58% of those students were attending Ravenswood City School District schools.

Despite being one of the wealthiest counties in the nation, San Mateo County had significant rates of homelessness and precarious housing, particularly among Latino, Black and English language learning students, according to the April study conducted by the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and their Communities.

The researchers, who looked at the demographics of K-12 students experiencing housing insecurity in 22 districts countywide, discovered clusters of housing insecure students in certain areas, with the greatest numbers in the San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District and East Palo Alto's Ravenswood. Sequoia Union High School District, whose student body makes up almost 10% of the county's total, had 1.1%, or 117 students, experiencing housing instability from 2016-19, the seventh highest of all studied districts.

In the Redwood City and Belmont-Redwood Shores school districts, 0.33% (35 individuals) and 0.16% (9 individuals), respectively, of their student population were homeless or housing unstable over the same time period. Just over 6% of the students experiencing housing instability in the county attended Sequoia Union High, Redwood City or Belmont-Redwood Shores school districts.

Homelessness and housing instability can make students up to six times more likely to be chronically absent from school and four times more likely not to graduate high school, the study reported. Nationwide, 1.3 to 1.7 million youth are estimated to experience homelessness each year, according to the National Center for Homeless Education.

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The research, published in a report titled "Housing Instability and Educational Outcomes of San Mateo County Youth," was conducted by Stanford's John W. Gardner Center in partnership with the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and 22 county school districts.

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Leah Worthington
 
Leah Worthington, a Menlo Park native, joined the Redwood City Pulse in 2021. She covers everything from education and climate to housing and city government. Previously she worked as the online editor for California magazine in Berkeley and co-hosts a podcast. Se habla espaƱol! Read more >>

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Study: Thousands of students have experienced housing instability in San Mateo County

Stanford research finds students affected were disproportionately Latinx, Black and English language learners

by / Redwood City Pulse

Uploaded: Wed, Apr 27, 2022, 9:10 am

More than 2,600 students in school districts throughout San Mateo County experienced housing instability over a recent three-year period, according to a Stanford study. Some 58% of those students were attending Ravenswood City School District schools.

Despite being one of the wealthiest counties in the nation, San Mateo County had significant rates of homelessness and precarious housing, particularly among Latino, Black and English language learning students, according to the April study conducted by the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and their Communities.

The researchers, who looked at the demographics of K-12 students experiencing housing insecurity in 22 districts countywide, discovered clusters of housing insecure students in certain areas, with the greatest numbers in the San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District and East Palo Alto's Ravenswood. Sequoia Union High School District, whose student body makes up almost 10% of the county's total, had 1.1%, or 117 students, experiencing housing instability from 2016-19, the seventh highest of all studied districts.

In the Redwood City and Belmont-Redwood Shores school districts, 0.33% (35 individuals) and 0.16% (9 individuals), respectively, of their student population were homeless or housing unstable over the same time period. Just over 6% of the students experiencing housing instability in the county attended Sequoia Union High, Redwood City or Belmont-Redwood Shores school districts.

Homelessness and housing instability can make students up to six times more likely to be chronically absent from school and four times more likely not to graduate high school, the study reported. Nationwide, 1.3 to 1.7 million youth are estimated to experience homelessness each year, according to the National Center for Homeless Education.

The research, published in a report titled "Housing Instability and Educational Outcomes of San Mateo County Youth," was conducted by Stanford's John W. Gardner Center in partnership with the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and 22 county school districts.

Comments

Just Sayin'
Registered user
another community
on Apr 27, 2022 at 10:46 am
Just Sayin', another community
Registered user
on Apr 27, 2022 at 10:46 am

The reference to "housing instability" always strikes me as lame. These kids are, or sometimes are, or often are "homeless."


Andy
Registered user
Stanford
on Apr 27, 2022 at 12:53 pm
Andy, Stanford
Registered user
on Apr 27, 2022 at 12:53 pm

It's ironic that most residents of the region are left wing Democrats, yet refuse to build enough housing to help anyone other than wealthy elites live in the region.


Claudette
Registered user
Woodside
on Apr 27, 2022 at 10:18 pm
Claudette, Woodside
Registered user
on Apr 27, 2022 at 10:18 pm

Can both commenters agree that it is sad that these children have no stability or sense of home.


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