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Santa Clara County to create mental health navigator to better connect residents to services

New program would help people 'find the right path to treatment, and then stay on it

Ana Lilia Soto, youth development manager at the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health & Wellbeing, describes how allcove Palo Alto is reaching out to the community during a tour of the youth mental health clinic on June 30, 2021. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

A new program to help residents navigate Santa Clara County's mental health system, including public and private resources, is being developed by the county.

On Tuesday, the county Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to direct staff to create a new program designed to help those who encounter barriers to access when seeking mental health support for themselves or their loved ones.

"People who need mental health help for themselves, a friend or a family member are already in a world of hurt," wrote Supervisor Joe Simitian, who proposed the idea. "Then they have to confront a 'system' that's complicated, confusing, and bureaucratic. What I hear too often is that folks really need a guide."

Simitian said he calls it a "navigator" that would help residents "find the right path to treatment, and then stay on it."

More than 40,000 people accessed the county's behavioral health system in the last year, according to Simitian's office.

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About 4,500 of those accessed the county's addiction and substance use services — a 13% increase from the previous year.

The demand for services was heightened during the pandemic from both existing patients and new ones, with the stress of the pandemic exacerbating substance use disorders for many, according to a March 2021 report published by the American Psychological Association.

But Simitian said the need for a mental health navigator predates the pandemic.

"Even before the pandemic, demand for mental health and substance use services was high," said Simitian. "The pandemic — with its resulting isolation and economic consequences — has intensified these challenges."

In Santa Clara County, more than 30,000 people struggle with serious mental health conditions, county data showed. And in the last year, the county's behavioral health system referred about 24,000 people to the county's nonprofit partners.

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So, the navigator will work with those nonprofit partners and the county to better connect patients to the most appropriate resources for them and their families.

The program can find local resources for residents, with the ability to even connect them to private resources when appropriate. It also will provide support and troubleshooting if the first referral doesn't work out well.

"By guiding patients through and around barriers, we can help them get the treatment they need so they can get their lives back on track," Simitian said.

The proposal has received support from Asian Americans for Community Involvement, Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County, Behavioral Health Contractors' Association and Momentum for Health.

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Santa Clara County to create mental health navigator to better connect residents to services

New program would help people 'find the right path to treatment, and then stay on it

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Uploaded: Tue, Nov 16, 2021, 4:47 pm

A new program to help residents navigate Santa Clara County's mental health system, including public and private resources, is being developed by the county.

On Tuesday, the county Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to direct staff to create a new program designed to help those who encounter barriers to access when seeking mental health support for themselves or their loved ones.

"People who need mental health help for themselves, a friend or a family member are already in a world of hurt," wrote Supervisor Joe Simitian, who proposed the idea. "Then they have to confront a 'system' that's complicated, confusing, and bureaucratic. What I hear too often is that folks really need a guide."

Simitian said he calls it a "navigator" that would help residents "find the right path to treatment, and then stay on it."

More than 40,000 people accessed the county's behavioral health system in the last year, according to Simitian's office.

About 4,500 of those accessed the county's addiction and substance use services — a 13% increase from the previous year.

The demand for services was heightened during the pandemic from both existing patients and new ones, with the stress of the pandemic exacerbating substance use disorders for many, according to a March 2021 report published by the American Psychological Association.

But Simitian said the need for a mental health navigator predates the pandemic.

"Even before the pandemic, demand for mental health and substance use services was high," said Simitian. "The pandemic — with its resulting isolation and economic consequences — has intensified these challenges."

In Santa Clara County, more than 30,000 people struggle with serious mental health conditions, county data showed. And in the last year, the county's behavioral health system referred about 24,000 people to the county's nonprofit partners.

So, the navigator will work with those nonprofit partners and the county to better connect patients to the most appropriate resources for them and their families.

The program can find local resources for residents, with the ability to even connect them to private resources when appropriate. It also will provide support and troubleshooting if the first referral doesn't work out well.

"By guiding patients through and around barriers, we can help them get the treatment they need so they can get their lives back on track," Simitian said.

The proposal has received support from Asian Americans for Community Involvement, Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County, Behavioral Health Contractors' Association and Momentum for Health.

Comments

Joel
Registered user
Barron Park
on Nov 17, 2021 at 12:54 pm
Joel, Barron Park
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2021 at 12:54 pm

After reading the article on "Finding pathways to Mental Health"; my concern is that the Bay area services are not affordable to many of us. $300+ for private sessions and long waits (months) to get help. I know this is a chronic concern throughout the country. The VA system is a mess and their suicide count is rising exponentially.


cmarg
Registered user
Palo Alto High School
on Nov 20, 2021 at 12:21 pm
cmarg, Palo Alto High School
Registered user
on Nov 20, 2021 at 12:21 pm

I agree that the prices are crazy for Mental Health Professionals. I do feel a change in insurance to treat mental health challenges just like any other disease is needed. Also, creating a defined amount that the therapists receive for their therapy sessions. I have seen up to $500 for 50 minutes. I feel this is unconscionable. We need to push for Insurance coverage, reduce the stigma of mental health, and regulate the fees just like is done within medical facilities. Mental illness needs to be viewed just like we view illnesses such as cancer. It is time people realized that there are so many suffering. We must get rid of the stigma.


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