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Pets in Need cuts contract with Palo Alto, alleging city's 'egregious failure'

Beleaguered animal services organization plans to end its operation of the Palo Alto Animal Shelter in a year

Pets In Need Executive Director Al Mollica walks in a room at the Palo Alto Animal Shelter where the nonprofit fosters cats on June 15, 2021. Photo by Daniela Beltran B.

Pets in Need, the city of Palo Alto's animal services contractor, announced in a fiery letter on Monday that it is ending its contract with the city of Palo Alto, alleging the city has breached its agreement with the nonprofit.

The 55-year-old nonprofit organization itself has come under harsh criticism since police announced the citations of three employees in the deaths of seven puppies. Twenty other dogs in the same van became overheated during transport from the Central Valley to Palo Alto on Aug. 2. The three employees were charged with failure to give proper care and attention to an animal and inhumane transportation of an animal by the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office on Oct. 26.

A police investigative report found that 27 dogs transported from other shelters in the Central Valley for housing and potential adoption were packed into a poorly ventilated and improperly cooled van. The animals were not given water. Many of the dogs were panting and in distress by the time they arrived at the Palo Alto shelter, according to the police report. They had traveled in 90-plus degree heat for at least four hours.

Multiple board-certified veterinary anatomic pathologists could not conclusively determine the specific cause of death because of moderate decomposition of the puppies' tissues, but heat stroke and/or traumatic asphyxiation were top considerations for the causes of death, according to conclusions from three autopsy reports noted in the police investigation, which a police investigator noted she received on Sept.14.

Pets in Need Executive Director Al Mollica notified City Manager Ed Shikada on Nov. 15 that the organization will end its services in Palo Alto in one year. The organization claims that the city failed in its contractual agreement, which hampered the operations of Pets in Need (PIN).

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"As PIN has continuously advised you and your team, our operations in Palo Alto have been significantly hampered by the egregious failure of the city to meet the timelines for the construction and renovation projects specified in the agreement. Failure in particular to meet the expected completion date of March 15, 2019 for renovation of the existing kennels has caused injury to both dogs and staff. This is a clear breach of the city's duty," Executive Director Al Mollica wrote.

He noted that Cheryl Nolan, the organization's attorney, sent a letter to the city on May 11, 2021 stating that "PIN urgently requires repairs and renovations to its existing dog kennels to keep staff and the dogs residing there from continuing to be injured … The existing kennels and kennel house are neither adequate nor safe."

Pets in Need Executive Director Al Mollica. Embarcadero Media file photo.

Nolan's letter included a draft amendment to the agreement with new deadlines for the upgrade projects and penalties for late performance. If an amendment wasn't signed within 28 days, Pets in Need would consider all available remedies including filing a lawsuit, the May letter said.

Mollica said that city leaders assured Pets in Need that the renovations and construction of the new kennels would be given top priority.

"In reliance on your assurances, PIN elected not to pursue the amendment or file a formal notice of breach of contract but to continue working with the city to expedite these vitally important projects," Mollica wrote. "In point of fact, in spite of those assurances and the continuing entreaties of PIN staff, the city has not even begun the actual renovations. In addition, your officials have informed us that there are no longer adequate funds to construct a new kennel house, which was clearly understood to be the centerpiece capital improvement project when we negotiated the contract with the city."

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The condition of the kennels has meant they weren't safe for dogs and remained empty, Pets in Need said in a separate statement posted on the organization's website. It said it didn't make the decision lightly, but "made it out of deep consideration of our ability to effectively carry out our mission and serve the animals and communities in our care. Unfortunately, our relationship the past three years has been marked by the city's inability to fulfill agreements that have materially affected the manner in which Pets In Need could care for our animals at the Palo Alto shelter," the statement said.

New Year, a dog up for adoption at Pets in Need in Palo Alto, howls to fellow dogs in the dog kennel area during a tour of the shelter in 2019. Embarcadero Media file photo by Veronica Weber.

"Pets In Need has worked tirelessly to fulfill our responsibilities under the contract during the past three years, and we have repeatedly notified the city of its deficiencies with respect to this contract," the statement said.

Pets In Need also operates its flagship shelter in Redwood City in addition to Palo Alto's. It listed some of its accomplishments despite the facility deficiencies it has experienced, it said.

The organization launched an emergency assistance program for animals and people impacted financially by the COVID-19 pandemic, distributing more than $750,000 in aid for the care of nearly 750 pets and their guardians; placed 1,040 animals in foster homes during the pandemic; increased adoptions and expanded services to pets and their guardians throughout the region. It saved the lives of almost 600 large-breed dogs that were at risk of being euthanized and conducted free and low-cost vaccine clinics in East Palo Alto and at the Palo Alto shelter, it said.

The organization said it would continue to serve Palo Alto, Los Altos and Los Altos Hills residents until the contract expired. The Redwood City facility and services would remain unchanged.

On Tuesday, the city responded to Mollica's allegations with an email statement.

"It's unfortunate that PIN found it necessary to blame the city for things not working out as hoped for all parties. Several capital improvements to the Palo Alto Animal Shelter have been made in coordination with Pets In Need. To date, the City of Palo Alto has invested $1.5 million, completing office and classroom building and medical suite renovation projects at the Palo Alto animal shelter, as well as minor improvements and repairs to the existing kennel building that were completed early in the contract term.

"The city completed the design of a new kennel building, but the construction cost estimate was greater than the remaining available budget. Due to the approximately $500,000 funding gap and delayed schedule in the construction of the new kennel building, Pets In Need (PIN) requested that the city prioritize using available funding to provide upgrades to the existing kennel building that improve the day-to-day conditions for the animals. These upgrades include acoustics, lighting and mechanical system, drainage upgrades, epoxy floor and paint and replacing the existing kennel caging system," the city said.

City staff last updated the council in June, when the council approved a contract amendment for additional design work for the existing kennel building. Staff, in coordination with the consultant and Pets in Need, have completed the design work and are in the process of purchasing new kennels. The improvements to the existing kennel building are anticipated to cost $400,000, the city said.

The decision by Pets In Need to initiate its divorce from Palo Alto leaves the city with the same dilemma it was facing in 2017, when the council began its quest to outsource animal services — a function that has historically been performed by city employees. The operation fell into limbo in 2012, when Mountain View opted to pull out of its partnership in the shelter, taking away its $400,000 in annual contributions to the operation. A subsequent attempt by then-City Manager James Keene to shut down the shelter fizzled in the face of intense community opposition, prompting the city to issue a request for proposals and to ultimately negotiate an agreement with Pets In Need.

The new development also deals a massive setback to the city's plan to ultimately replace its shelter at 3281 E. Bayshore Road, an undersized facility that a 2015 audit described as "outdated" and as a one that "does not meet modern standards for animal care." While the city has made some upgrades to the shelter since then, the five-year partnership with Pets In Need envisioned a multiyear fundraising campaign by the nonprofit to support construction of the new facility.

The planned departure of Pets In Need effectively halts the city's plans to replace the shelter while leaving it with the same question that the council wrestled with since 2012: How to maintain a popular municipal service at a time of flagging revenues and budget cuts? With Pets In Need set to depart, the council will be tasked with reconciling in the coming months the desires of local animal lovers with competing demands to restore funding for community services and public safety.

Shikada expressed disappointment about the nonprofit's termination letter on Monday.

"Our partnership with Pets In Need has been an important one, providing sheltering services for our community and the cities of Los Altos and Los Altos Hills. Given our three-year partnership, the city is disappointed to receive today's announcement by Pets In Need of their intent to terminate our agreement in the next 12 months, particularly under current circumstances.

"The city will evaluate option and determine next steps in order to provide a smooth transition," he said.

Read Pets in Need's letter to the city of Palo Alto terminating its contract.

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Pets in Need cuts contract with Palo Alto, alleging city's 'egregious failure'

Beleaguered animal services organization plans to end its operation of the Palo Alto Animal Shelter in a year

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Mon, Nov 15, 2021, 10:54 pm
Updated: Tue, Nov 16, 2021, 6:16 pm

Pets in Need, the city of Palo Alto's animal services contractor, announced in a fiery letter on Monday that it is ending its contract with the city of Palo Alto, alleging the city has breached its agreement with the nonprofit.

The 55-year-old nonprofit organization itself has come under harsh criticism since police announced the citations of three employees in the deaths of seven puppies. Twenty other dogs in the same van became overheated during transport from the Central Valley to Palo Alto on Aug. 2. The three employees were charged with failure to give proper care and attention to an animal and inhumane transportation of an animal by the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office on Oct. 26.

A police investigative report found that 27 dogs transported from other shelters in the Central Valley for housing and potential adoption were packed into a poorly ventilated and improperly cooled van. The animals were not given water. Many of the dogs were panting and in distress by the time they arrived at the Palo Alto shelter, according to the police report. They had traveled in 90-plus degree heat for at least four hours.

Multiple board-certified veterinary anatomic pathologists could not conclusively determine the specific cause of death because of moderate decomposition of the puppies' tissues, but heat stroke and/or traumatic asphyxiation were top considerations for the causes of death, according to conclusions from three autopsy reports noted in the police investigation, which a police investigator noted she received on Sept.14.

Pets in Need Executive Director Al Mollica notified City Manager Ed Shikada on Nov. 15 that the organization will end its services in Palo Alto in one year. The organization claims that the city failed in its contractual agreement, which hampered the operations of Pets in Need (PIN).

"As PIN has continuously advised you and your team, our operations in Palo Alto have been significantly hampered by the egregious failure of the city to meet the timelines for the construction and renovation projects specified in the agreement. Failure in particular to meet the expected completion date of March 15, 2019 for renovation of the existing kennels has caused injury to both dogs and staff. This is a clear breach of the city's duty," Executive Director Al Mollica wrote.

He noted that Cheryl Nolan, the organization's attorney, sent a letter to the city on May 11, 2021 stating that "PIN urgently requires repairs and renovations to its existing dog kennels to keep staff and the dogs residing there from continuing to be injured … The existing kennels and kennel house are neither adequate nor safe."

Nolan's letter included a draft amendment to the agreement with new deadlines for the upgrade projects and penalties for late performance. If an amendment wasn't signed within 28 days, Pets in Need would consider all available remedies including filing a lawsuit, the May letter said.

Mollica said that city leaders assured Pets in Need that the renovations and construction of the new kennels would be given top priority.

"In reliance on your assurances, PIN elected not to pursue the amendment or file a formal notice of breach of contract but to continue working with the city to expedite these vitally important projects," Mollica wrote. "In point of fact, in spite of those assurances and the continuing entreaties of PIN staff, the city has not even begun the actual renovations. In addition, your officials have informed us that there are no longer adequate funds to construct a new kennel house, which was clearly understood to be the centerpiece capital improvement project when we negotiated the contract with the city."

The condition of the kennels has meant they weren't safe for dogs and remained empty, Pets in Need said in a separate statement posted on the organization's website. It said it didn't make the decision lightly, but "made it out of deep consideration of our ability to effectively carry out our mission and serve the animals and communities in our care. Unfortunately, our relationship the past three years has been marked by the city's inability to fulfill agreements that have materially affected the manner in which Pets In Need could care for our animals at the Palo Alto shelter," the statement said.

"Pets In Need has worked tirelessly to fulfill our responsibilities under the contract during the past three years, and we have repeatedly notified the city of its deficiencies with respect to this contract," the statement said.

Pets In Need also operates its flagship shelter in Redwood City in addition to Palo Alto's. It listed some of its accomplishments despite the facility deficiencies it has experienced, it said.

The organization launched an emergency assistance program for animals and people impacted financially by the COVID-19 pandemic, distributing more than $750,000 in aid for the care of nearly 750 pets and their guardians; placed 1,040 animals in foster homes during the pandemic; increased adoptions and expanded services to pets and their guardians throughout the region. It saved the lives of almost 600 large-breed dogs that were at risk of being euthanized and conducted free and low-cost vaccine clinics in East Palo Alto and at the Palo Alto shelter, it said.

The organization said it would continue to serve Palo Alto, Los Altos and Los Altos Hills residents until the contract expired. The Redwood City facility and services would remain unchanged.

On Tuesday, the city responded to Mollica's allegations with an email statement.

"It's unfortunate that PIN found it necessary to blame the city for things not working out as hoped for all parties. Several capital improvements to the Palo Alto Animal Shelter have been made in coordination with Pets In Need. To date, the City of Palo Alto has invested $1.5 million, completing office and classroom building and medical suite renovation projects at the Palo Alto animal shelter, as well as minor improvements and repairs to the existing kennel building that were completed early in the contract term.

"The city completed the design of a new kennel building, but the construction cost estimate was greater than the remaining available budget. Due to the approximately $500,000 funding gap and delayed schedule in the construction of the new kennel building, Pets In Need (PIN) requested that the city prioritize using available funding to provide upgrades to the existing kennel building that improve the day-to-day conditions for the animals. These upgrades include acoustics, lighting and mechanical system, drainage upgrades, epoxy floor and paint and replacing the existing kennel caging system," the city said.

City staff last updated the council in June, when the council approved a contract amendment for additional design work for the existing kennel building. Staff, in coordination with the consultant and Pets in Need, have completed the design work and are in the process of purchasing new kennels. The improvements to the existing kennel building are anticipated to cost $400,000, the city said.

The decision by Pets In Need to initiate its divorce from Palo Alto leaves the city with the same dilemma it was facing in 2017, when the council began its quest to outsource animal services — a function that has historically been performed by city employees. The operation fell into limbo in 2012, when Mountain View opted to pull out of its partnership in the shelter, taking away its $400,000 in annual contributions to the operation. A subsequent attempt by then-City Manager James Keene to shut down the shelter fizzled in the face of intense community opposition, prompting the city to issue a request for proposals and to ultimately negotiate an agreement with Pets In Need.

The new development also deals a massive setback to the city's plan to ultimately replace its shelter at 3281 E. Bayshore Road, an undersized facility that a 2015 audit described as "outdated" and as a one that "does not meet modern standards for animal care." While the city has made some upgrades to the shelter since then, the five-year partnership with Pets In Need envisioned a multiyear fundraising campaign by the nonprofit to support construction of the new facility.

The planned departure of Pets In Need effectively halts the city's plans to replace the shelter while leaving it with the same question that the council wrestled with since 2012: How to maintain a popular municipal service at a time of flagging revenues and budget cuts? With Pets In Need set to depart, the council will be tasked with reconciling in the coming months the desires of local animal lovers with competing demands to restore funding for community services and public safety.

Shikada expressed disappointment about the nonprofit's termination letter on Monday.

"Our partnership with Pets In Need has been an important one, providing sheltering services for our community and the cities of Los Altos and Los Altos Hills. Given our three-year partnership, the city is disappointed to receive today's announcement by Pets In Need of their intent to terminate our agreement in the next 12 months, particularly under current circumstances.

"The city will evaluate option and determine next steps in order to provide a smooth transition," he said.

Read Pets in Need's letter to the city of Palo Alto terminating its contract.

Comments

Rebecca Eisenberg
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 15, 2021 at 11:28 pm
Rebecca Eisenberg, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2021 at 11:28 pm

Neither side is looking good right now. PIN has valid complaints that Palo Alto failed to provide repairs it was contractually obligated to perform. Palo Alto's contractual breaches did not justify PIN's criminally negligent behavior in killing seven puppies, however.

As has become increasingly evident in recent years, Palo Alto City Council needs to get its act together and diversify its revenue streams. Currently Palo Alto is the only city in the state, if not country, that fails to tax its businesses at all. With the preponderance of companies with more than a billion dollars of revenue located here, all Palo Alto needs to do is tax companies with revenues above a billion dollars a year, and our city would have ample funding to restore all of the terminated community services, and to build a pet rescue facility that reflects the values of our animal-loving community. But Palo Alto City Council lacks integrity or courage to do the easy, right thing.

Who is the worse offender here? They both behave badly. Our community deserves much, much better.


Online Name
Registered user
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Nov 16, 2021 at 4:30 am
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 4:30 am

Yes, our city deserves better. It's time for city hall and city managers to remember that the community values its animal services probably a lot more than most things the city does -- like clog up traffic with road furniture, like destroy the President Hotel and the lives of residents and waste resources publishing weekly recipes in the city manager's blog.

Time for Mr. Shikada and staff to Mr. Keene's destruction and return our Animal Services to its previous level and hours of services.


Doofydog
Registered user
another community
on Nov 16, 2021 at 5:54 am
Doofydog, another community
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 5:54 am

Funny how there were no egregious failures until PIN killed seven puppies. [Portion removed.]

The shelter is old and while communities around us built new shelters, CPA insisted they couldn’t afford it so co reacted with this horrible retail rescue even after being told every way to Sunday something like this would happen. However the shelter run by city employees ran efficiently, cleanly and without killing puppies due to neglect and cruelty. I hope everyone sees this for what it is, a blatant and pitiful attempt at deflection by Al Mollica.


Heckity
Registered user
Barron Park
on Nov 16, 2021 at 7:24 am
Heckity, Barron Park
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 7:24 am

Sadly, this is precisely the behavior I expect from Al Mollica. Angry, controlling, deflective, and impulsive, a pattern displayed ever since negotiations to take over the shelter began. Coupled with Jim Keene's obsession with getting the shelter off the city books, what could go wrong?

Egregious by definition: shocking, appalling, horrific, horrifying, horrible, terrible, awful, dreadful, grievous, gross, ghastly, hideous, horrendous. All apply to the seven dead puppies and the other 20 overheated dogs.

In addition, Mollica fails to disclose the building of new spay/neuter clinic while focusing on the "dangerous" old dog kennels - yes, they are not state of the art, and no, they are not dangerous.

Both the City of Palo Alto and Al Mollica have failed the residents of their covered areas - an area so wealthy it would take a .01% contribution from ten or so tech companies and billionaires to fund a solid animal shelter. And the remaining Animal Control Officers, still reporting to PAPD, are saddled with an inordinate amount of responsibility over these jurisdictions, and doing an outstanding job, while the city and PIN play the fiddle while idly watching Rome burn. Appalling.

Palo Alto, are you listening? Al Mollica, good day.


rita vrhel
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 16, 2021 at 11:01 am
rita vrhel, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 11:01 am

Well another mess occurring under Ed Shikida's rule.

Surely funds could have been found for the Animal Shelter's rehabilitation. Funds were found for: a Public Safety Building, another garage, an ugly bridge, the Junior Museum, a Rinconada park re-do, (could have been delayed a few years) and the salaries of senior staff working under Mr. Shikada.

[Portion removed.]

Mr. Mollica should resign. Mr Shikada should let go of some of his senior staff (hired by Mr. Keene).

Then PIN and the City could make a community appeal for the required funds.

Let's not depend on large donations from a few; we can ALL donate. The Animal shelter, long supported by residents, could be built and serve our animals in a kind and humane manner.

Money can usually be found for what you really want. Thank you.


MBoots
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 16, 2021 at 11:03 am
MBoots, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 11:03 am

Pets in Need has no response that can exonerate them in the deaths of 7 puppies and the mistreatment of the other 20 dogs in that transport. Sources inside PIN have alleged this was not the first time animals died during their transport by PIN, although Mollica denied this in statements to employees. So time to change the subject! Apparently the shelter had more than enough kennels to provide care for animals taken in from Palo Alto, Los Altos, and LAHills...so much capacity that PIN could regularly import dogs from out of the area. So big RED HERRING Al Mollica! The City's renovation of the shelter was aimed at providing space needed for the animals from the PA/LA/LAH-contracted service area, not to support Pets In Needs broader activities as a non-profit. But instead PIN saw this contract as a way to get Palo Alto taxpayers to support PINs other goals.
Mollica doesn't mention that the City renovated the veterinary space at the shelter, ostensibly so PiN could offer low-cost spay-neuter services to residents. But PiN has only very recently offered a few--so few it is absurd-- appointments to residents, on one day a week only. The rest of the time the vet is busy with animals that are imported by PIN. Not saying PIN as a separate non-profit is wrong to do this. But they are ignoring and denying the services they are required to provide, by contract, and using the City's tax dollars to support their other non-profit activities.


eileen
Registered user
College Terrace
on Nov 16, 2021 at 11:42 am
eileen , College Terrace
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 11:42 am

Rebecca Eisenberg, I totally agree with you! So many of our services are
being outsourced! Not good for Palo Alto.


Jazzy*
Registered user
another community
on Nov 16, 2021 at 11:58 am
Jazzy*, another community
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 11:58 am

All my opinions here... I think PIN should dissolve, and I think not be allowed to go into business again. No matter the circumstances, they were grossly negligent, intentionally and criminally so, as they knew what was going on with the defenseless pets in their care. As a lawyer I'd want more information before a conclusion. As a lawyer I'd want more information re which employees, and if the company itself, should be formally charged. One might think I am biased: I love animals, have a 7 year old rescued german shepherd from San Mateo Humane Society for a year now, other rescues in the past. But animal cruelty is cruelty, no matter my love for them. As for the City, certainly blame there also... they should have investigated occasionally, shut down PIN earlier, sought another group to take care of the animals, made public the dire need for help, and as last resort spent the animals to another adequately staffed facility. Lack of funding is absolutely NO excuse for what PIN did. Had I known, I would have taken one more of those poor dogs they let die. In that heat, no water, no attention for hours, that is intentional. We would arrest, try and probably imprison anyone who left a child in that circumstance...


Green Gables
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 16, 2021 at 1:32 pm
Green Gables, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 1:32 pm

At least by outsourcing, the City of Palo Alto does not have to pay into CALPERS.


William
Registered user
Mountain View
on Nov 16, 2021 at 7:17 pm
William, Mountain View
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 7:17 pm

In the long and storied history of our animal shelter there exist repeated controversies about the management of our animal communities in Palo Alto. Dating back to before incorporation, Palo Alto wrestled with the issue of how to house the strays and manage the administration of animal care and control, to the ultimate dissatisfaction of of all sides, and the repeated reinvention of who should be in charge, from the Town Marshall in 1894, to a contract poundmaster in 1901 (who would within six months would be arrested and charged with cruelty to animals), to the founding of the Palo Alto SPCA in 1908, to the contracting of animal shelter services from 1924 through 1972 with the Palo Alto Humane Society, to the City assuming responsibility for animal care and control with the creation and administration of Animal Services from 1972 to 2019, to the City contracting out animal care to Pets In Need in 2019, while retaining oversight of animal control. I observed the changes to the service from 1974 while employed inside the building as animal attendant, and then out on the streets while a field officer for animal control from 1979 to 2020. When I retired eighteen months ago, I had the pleasure of working with dedicated staff and volunteers of Pets In Need for the first year of their tenure. I was genuinely impressed with the improvements initiated by PIN in what I hoped would be a progressive relationship with the City. The announcements this week from Pets In Need and the City leave me heartbroken and lamenting what from my outsider’s view is yet another loss of direction.
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose"


RDR
Registered user
another community
on Nov 16, 2021 at 7:18 pm
RDR, another community
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 7:18 pm

Palo Alto City == Cheapskates


PattiP.
Registered user
Professorville
on Nov 16, 2021 at 9:47 pm
PattiP., Professorville
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2021 at 9:47 pm

The City gave Pets in Need the use of the shelter and agreed to renovate parts of the shelter so that PIN could care for animals from Palo Alto under the contractual--and paid-- agreement. Clearly PIN has more than enough kennels to house the dogs rescued from Palo Alto, because they had enough room to run frequent trips to bring in large numbers of dogs from outside the area. I was told (by one of the many people who left the organization in disgust and distress at the poor management there) that PIN also transferred animals from their Redwood City shelter (which is not part of the City contract) to Palo Alto; again proving that there are more than enough usable kennels in Palo Alto. It also means that Palo Alto taxpayers were subsidizing Pets In Needs general operations.
Actions speak louder than words, and PINs actions (using the shelter to house dogs from the Redwood City shelter, or dogs imported from other areas) shows the claims in this letter to the City are misleading (at a minimum) or worse. Ending the contract with the City is just an attempt to deflect attention from PIN's management failures and inhumane treatment of these dogs.


Local Resident
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 17, 2021 at 1:53 pm
Local Resident, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2021 at 1:53 pm

So they had enough room to bring in dogs from Redwood City and Central valley (substantial expansion of their mission, which the city should not be funding). Furthermore, the slow facility renovation in no way absolves PIN of the deaths of the puppies which could have been avoided with better care during transportation. More importantly, their mission should never involve importing animals from far away. This is so clearly an attempt by Mollica to deflect blame and change the subject. Its clear Mollica needs to go along with PIN. Even the city can do a much better job.


mjh
Registered user
College Terrace
on Nov 17, 2021 at 2:08 pm
mjh, College Terrace
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2021 at 2:08 pm

It was heartbreaking to watch our then city manager James Keene instructing staff, including our now city manager Al Shikada, to do their best to shut down our city run animal services shelter. Getting rid of the expert and dedicated animal services staff while watching the then majority of council members go along this goal.


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