News

'Get the Zuck out': Protesters call for Mark Zuckerberg's removal as Facebook CEO

Rally comes after whistleblower says social media company 'chooses profit over safety'

A caravan of about 20 protesters parked by Mark Zuckerberg's Palo Alto residence on Sunday afternoon to honk up a storm and deliver a message to Facebook's CEO: "Get the Zuck out!"

Protesters taped signs to their vehicles that called for Zuckerberg to be fired as CEO and stated that "Facebook is bad for democracy" after a whistleblower recently leaked thousands of confidential documents revealing how the Menlo Park-based social media giant is aware of its role in spreading disinformation and harming young people's mental health.

The event, which took place in front of Zuckerberg's home on Edgewood Drive, was organized by two San Francisco-based nonprofits: Global Exchange, an international human rights group, and Media Alliance, which promotes using media for social change. Raging Grannies, a local group of activists, and Code Pink, a women-led progressive grassroots organization, also helped plan the protest.

Tracy Rosenberg, Media Alliance's executive director, speaks to about 20 protesters assembled outside Mark Zuckerberg's Palo Alto home to demand he be fired from his job as Facebook CEO on Oct. 17, 2021. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Media Alliance executive director Tracy Rosenberg said in an interview that it would be nearly impossible to convince billions of people to delete their Facebook accounts, so, instead, users like herself should demand changes from the platform.

"We are indirectly paying Facebook with our time, attention and engagement, because there is no Facebook if we don't do that," Rosenberg said. "So as users we should have some collective power here and we're trying to manifest that."

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support Palo Alto Online for as little as $5/month.

Join

Facebook recently came under intense scrutiny from the public and federal lawmakers after Frances Haugen, a former product manager for the company, leaked troves of internal documents, detailing how the social media giant is aware that its products, including Instagram, spread disinformation and negatively impact teenagers' mental health yet chooses to avoid implementing effective safety measures.

A protester chants at a protest outside Mark Zuckerberg's Palo Alto home, demanding he be fired from his job as Facebook CEO on Oct. 17, 2021. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

"Facebook, over and over again, has shown it chooses profit over safety," Haugen said in a "60 Minutes" interview on Oct. 3.

In a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Oct. 5, Haugen, who joined Facebook in 2019 and was part of its civic misinformation team, urged federal lawmakers to regulate the company and request more documentation from it in order to effectively do so.

"I'm here … because I believe Facebook's products harm children, stoke division and weaken our democracy," Haugen testified to lawmakers. "The company's leadership knows how to make Facebook and Instagram safer but won't make the necessary changes."

In response, Zuckerberg took to Facebook to argue that his company has taken steps to consider its users' well-being, such as an algorithm adjustment that pushes fewer viral videos and more content from friends and family, and Haugen mischaracterized the company's intentions.

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

Stay informed

Get the latest local news and information sent straight to your inbox.

"It's disheartening to see that work taken out of context and used to construct a false narrative that we don't care," Zuckerberg wrote.

This is far from the first time Facebook has had to parry with calls for more regulations. In the past few years, the company was criticised for stoking divisions in democracy amidst the 2020 presidential election, impacting youth's mental health, spreading COVID-19 misinformation and even inciting genocide in Myanmar.

Many people who heavily rely on Facebook for their work or to keep in touch with friends and family, but are also critical of the platform, are often stuck at an impasse on how to effectively protest against a social media giant with nearly 3 billion users.

"I'd love to delete Facebook," said Debi Rose, 61, a protester from San Mateo who manages several groups on the social media platform. "But I just can't. I have too many responsibilities on it."

Calling for Zuckerberg to step down as CEO is also a monumental challenge in itself. Rosenberg recognized that Zuckerberg has greater voting power at the shareholders' table, which is why she believes users need to coalesce and apply the pressure for change. Global Exchange and Media Alliance recently formed the Facebook Users Union under the belief that users are essentially stakeholders in the platform and thus should have a say in the decisions made by the company, Rosenberg said.

"We understand that technically the board cannot fire Zuckerberg because of the stock arrangement," she said. "However, that doesn’t mean that he can't be pressured or forced to step down. And we hope to start that conversation."

Marni Barne, a member of the Raging Grannies, holds her fist up in the air at a protest during which about 20 demonstrators drove by Mark Zuckerberg's Palo Alto home seeking he be fired from his job as Facebook CEO on Oct. 17, 2021. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

A front row seat to local high school sports.

Check out our new newsletter, the Playbook.

Follow Palo Alto Online and the Palo Alto Weekly on Twitter @paloaltoweekly, Facebook and on Instagram @paloaltoonline for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Your support is vital to us continuing to bring you political news. Become a member today.

'Get the Zuck out': Protesters call for Mark Zuckerberg's removal as Facebook CEO

Rally comes after whistleblower says social media company 'chooses profit over safety'

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Sun, Oct 17, 2021, 4:53 pm

A caravan of about 20 protesters parked by Mark Zuckerberg's Palo Alto residence on Sunday afternoon to honk up a storm and deliver a message to Facebook's CEO: "Get the Zuck out!"

Protesters taped signs to their vehicles that called for Zuckerberg to be fired as CEO and stated that "Facebook is bad for democracy" after a whistleblower recently leaked thousands of confidential documents revealing how the Menlo Park-based social media giant is aware of its role in spreading disinformation and harming young people's mental health.

The event, which took place in front of Zuckerberg's home on Edgewood Drive, was organized by two San Francisco-based nonprofits: Global Exchange, an international human rights group, and Media Alliance, which promotes using media for social change. Raging Grannies, a local group of activists, and Code Pink, a women-led progressive grassroots organization, also helped plan the protest.

Media Alliance executive director Tracy Rosenberg said in an interview that it would be nearly impossible to convince billions of people to delete their Facebook accounts, so, instead, users like herself should demand changes from the platform.

"We are indirectly paying Facebook with our time, attention and engagement, because there is no Facebook if we don't do that," Rosenberg said. "So as users we should have some collective power here and we're trying to manifest that."

Facebook recently came under intense scrutiny from the public and federal lawmakers after Frances Haugen, a former product manager for the company, leaked troves of internal documents, detailing how the social media giant is aware that its products, including Instagram, spread disinformation and negatively impact teenagers' mental health yet chooses to avoid implementing effective safety measures.

"Facebook, over and over again, has shown it chooses profit over safety," Haugen said in a "60 Minutes" interview on Oct. 3.

In a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Oct. 5, Haugen, who joined Facebook in 2019 and was part of its civic misinformation team, urged federal lawmakers to regulate the company and request more documentation from it in order to effectively do so.

"I'm here … because I believe Facebook's products harm children, stoke division and weaken our democracy," Haugen testified to lawmakers. "The company's leadership knows how to make Facebook and Instagram safer but won't make the necessary changes."

In response, Zuckerberg took to Facebook to argue that his company has taken steps to consider its users' well-being, such as an algorithm adjustment that pushes fewer viral videos and more content from friends and family, and Haugen mischaracterized the company's intentions.

"It's disheartening to see that work taken out of context and used to construct a false narrative that we don't care," Zuckerberg wrote.

This is far from the first time Facebook has had to parry with calls for more regulations. In the past few years, the company was criticised for stoking divisions in democracy amidst the 2020 presidential election, impacting youth's mental health, spreading COVID-19 misinformation and even inciting genocide in Myanmar.

Many people who heavily rely on Facebook for their work or to keep in touch with friends and family, but are also critical of the platform, are often stuck at an impasse on how to effectively protest against a social media giant with nearly 3 billion users.

"I'd love to delete Facebook," said Debi Rose, 61, a protester from San Mateo who manages several groups on the social media platform. "But I just can't. I have too many responsibilities on it."

Calling for Zuckerberg to step down as CEO is also a monumental challenge in itself. Rosenberg recognized that Zuckerberg has greater voting power at the shareholders' table, which is why she believes users need to coalesce and apply the pressure for change. Global Exchange and Media Alliance recently formed the Facebook Users Union under the belief that users are essentially stakeholders in the platform and thus should have a say in the decisions made by the company, Rosenberg said.

"We understand that technically the board cannot fire Zuckerberg because of the stock arrangement," she said. "However, that doesn’t mean that he can't be pressured or forced to step down. And we hope to start that conversation."

Comments

Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Oct 17, 2021 at 5:27 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Oct 17, 2021 at 5:27 pm

These protestors need to get a life. If you're not happy with Facebook, don't use it. I never have and neither have our three young adult children. Which is odd, considering they grew up on technology. We have real friends. And if you are using Facebook, and you can't figure out that you were being used as a pawn to further a billionaires pocket all along, that's your fault. Even Zuckerberg was quoted years ago. "The easier you connect with people in real life, the less likely you are to be on Facebook." I totally agree. Keep in contact with family and friends the old fashioned way...


Online Name
Registered user
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Oct 17, 2021 at 6:03 pm
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
Registered user
on Oct 17, 2021 at 6:03 pm

Actually it's not true that Facebook users don't have real friends; our real-life friends use it to organize/publicize real-life events ranging like house concerts, band gigs and bookstore readings etc that we'd miss without Facebook. We can also stay in touch with friends from different parts of our lives -- people we see regularly, people who've moved away, people we grew up with, people we worked with, people who read/watch specific media... In fact, I first learned of this article on Facebook!

There are all sorts of groups for industry professionals, former colleagues, people with the same breed of pet or political leanings. Some of these groups are public and some are invitation-only after the host/moderator ensures you meet their criteria.

It's a way of staying in touch with people from different parts of your life. There's a whole series of groups called "If you grew up in Town, State, what do you remember?" The group for my little town of 2,500 has 1,500 members I would have totally lost touch with otherwise. There are at least two Palo Alto forums, one for memories and one for current events with1,900 people.

So.. back to the question of Facebook and what it's done to Democracy and the reasons for the protests....


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Oct 17, 2021 at 8:07 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Oct 17, 2021 at 8:07 pm

Using Facebook for business purposes (promoting concerts, etc.) makes sense. I'm referring to people who feel like their "Facebook friends" are real friends. These people are killing time. If you you died tomorrow, would they attend your funeral? Do they attend weddings, baby showers or baptisms of your family or friends? Call me old fashioned, but staying on touch with family and friends should be "normal" not online. People will say anything online. People pretend to have "perfect lives" on Facebook because it makes them feel better about themselves. If you care about your family and friends you'll keep in touch, not log in because you're bored. Social media isn't social. Getting together is.

If Zuckerberg doesn't believe in his own product ("The easier you connect with people...") what does it really say about it? You're being used so he can make a profit. Residents of Silicon Valley should understand this more than anyone. They live in your neighborhood. Nobody should be surprised what's going on with Facebook if you understand what Facebook is "really about."


Online Name
Registered user
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Oct 17, 2021 at 9:35 pm
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
Registered user
on Oct 17, 2021 at 9:35 pm

Jennifer, everyone's experience on FB and with other online communities is different but yes, I've gone to real-life funerals, weddings, memorials etc, of people I know online and in "real" life. A friend changed her status to "widowed" on Facebook and people flocked to her offline/in person to offer sympathy. The memorial was held in person but people also posted photos,

Sure, some people pretend to have perfect lives for "public" posts and I joke at how unsafe it is to post something like "Here I am in Hawaii! So glad to get away for 2 weeks!" as an invitation to burglars. If they're smart, they've limited those posts to FRIENDS rather than made them open to the public,

Many of us have lived/worked elsewhere and keeping up ties with widely dispersed friends becomes important as our friends move to other locales.

I forgot to mention above that the Palo Alto "memory" group has 12,750 people with maybe half of those who've moved elsewhere,


Bystander
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Oct 18, 2021 at 7:45 am
Bystander, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 7:45 am

For the period of the pandemic's start Facebook has been a lifeline for so many people along with Zoom.

Prior to the pandemic, school alumni groups, church groups, parent groups, nostalgia groups, cooking groups, etc. were all popular. The pandemic meant that other forms of keeping in touch face to face were impossible. Facebook and Zoom took over that space. Extended family news and photos have been very important for mental health of those living alone and remote from those who are dear but not near and even sometimes those who are near!

As to the leadership of the company, I can't comment except to say that if it wasn't Zuck and Facebook, it might have been MySpace, or something else. Don't blame the tool, blame the fact that there are people nowadays who have sinister motivation when it comes to social media. The barn door has been opened and won't be going away anytime soon.


JR
Registered user
Palo Verde
on Oct 18, 2021 at 7:46 am
JR, Palo Verde
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 7:46 am

If you have a problem with Facebook then read a map correctly and protest at Facebook in Menlo Park. Protesting at the private residence of the CEO crosses the line into intimidation and thuggery. It is unfair to the individual mentioned, not to mention his family and neighbors.


CalAveLocal
Registered user
Evergreen Park
on Oct 18, 2021 at 8:22 am
CalAveLocal, Evergreen Park
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 8:22 am

Jennifer, given that you have no experience with Facebook yourself, or any of your adult children do, I would like to take this opportunity (which I am sure you are going to welcome) to educate you on the subject of many legitimately good reasons to use Facebook and why people are upset for the policies that make it harmful for people to do so. I will only list a few good reasons:
1. Groups for interests that one might have but not necessarily share with real life friends - lets say, mountaineering or serious multi-day backpacking, or exotic/unusual pet breeds or types. There is tremendous amount of information exchanged that keeps people safe and happy.
2. Parenting groups - of course if you are lucky to have a mother such as yourself who will be able to give all sorts of advice to her parents, you do not need that. But many people are not so lucky; or have no parents; or have no friends who have children at the same age group; or have friends that have children that are dealing with the same issues, etc, etc, etc.
3. Many summer camps/after school directors create groups to post pictures and updates for sleep away camps/other camps for parents to see without having to waste a lot of time addressing each parent.
4. Support groups for chronic illnesses and/or cancer. One is not very likely to have a number of people in their circle that deal with the same illness.
5. Planning events for large group of people - one can sure do it over email, but it is much more convenient to do it on Facebook.
You see how many different uses there are, that are good, legitimate and helpful?
Now, we young adults who grew up with technology and do use Facebook are aware of the dangers social media might possess. And you can see how some of us can be extremely upset about the fact that Facebook uses algorithms that will push a teenage girl who came to Facebook to ask how to file her pet rat's nails effectively - and ends up in the down spiral of eating disorder


Cosmo Budigan
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Oct 18, 2021 at 10:31 am
Cosmo Budigan , Crescent Park
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 10:31 am

Can I get the ‘Raging Grannies’ onboard to stop Zuckerbook’s army of contractors and security personnel from parking in front of my house? I’m just asking a question.


eenee
Registered user
another community
on Oct 18, 2021 at 10:51 am
eenee, another community
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 10:51 am

My biggest beef with Facebook is that Trump paid Zuckerberg hundreds of millions of dollars and there was a complete program of disinformation on there. While Trump sought actively to weaken democracy Zuckerberg loved pulling in that money. I’m glad a spotlight has been shown on the sinister intents of this company


Ozymandias
Registered user
another community
on Oct 18, 2021 at 10:57 am
Ozymandias, another community
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 10:57 am

Frances Haugen's interest in censoring posts on Facebook align perfectly with Facebook's policies to censor political speech. They've demonstrated multiple times how their judgement on misinformation is no better than QAnon. The Hunter Biden laptop story is merely one example.


R. Cavendish
Registered user
another community
on Oct 18, 2021 at 11:35 am
R. Cavendish, another community
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 11:35 am

Seriously?

Getting Mark Zuckerberg to step down from Facebook is akin to Jeff Bezos resigning from Amazon.

Promoting divisiveness via social media is a big ticket revenue generator...no different than CNN and Fox News broadcasts.

And the advertisers who sponsor these controversial 'editorial' outlets are also responsible to a large extent.

Encouraging and promoting divisiveness is a lucrative revenue generator.


Nayeli
Registered user
Midtown
on Oct 18, 2021 at 12:38 pm
Nayeli, Midtown
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 12:38 pm

It is not Facebook's responsibility to determine what is or is not "socially" or "politically correct" to the point of censorship. The question is whether or not Facebook is a platform or a publisher. They are indeed a platform -- so they shouldn't be called out by activists and politicians to engage in the censorship of speech that conforms to the whims of their sociopolitical biases.

As for Mark Zuckerberg: Facebook is not a charity or a non-profit. It's a corporation that is making enormous money. As such, Mr. Zuckerberg is doing his job. It's just a shame that the most radical activists want him to operate according to their whims.


Roberta Lancaster
Registered user
Menlo Park
on Oct 18, 2021 at 12:53 pm
Roberta Lancaster, Menlo Park
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 12:53 pm

"It is not Facebook's responsibility to determine what is or is not "socially" or "politically correct" to the point of censorship. The question is whether or not Facebook is a platform or a publisher. They are indeed a platform -- so they shouldn't be called out by activists and politicians to engage in the censorship of speech that conforms to the whims of their sociopolitical biases.'

Then perhaps some form of Facebook moderator is needed (like on PA Online) to keep a check on various unfounded and inflammatory postings.



Mark
Registered user
Palo Verde
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:10 pm
Mark, Palo Verde
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:10 pm

GET THE ZUCK OUT!--NOT IN THE PLACE FOR YOU HERE; NOT IN OUR TOWN!

THAT MAN IS WICKED


JOEL HENNER
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:18 pm
JOEL HENNER, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:18 pm

I wonder if this protest was organized on Facebook. Does anyone know?


Nayeli
Registered user
Midtown
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:22 pm
Nayeli, Midtown
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:22 pm

@ Roberta Lancaster: That's exactly my point. There should NOT be any "moderators" who determine what is "inflammatory" or "misleading" unless they are universally considered as such. Otherwise, angry, partisan politicos have begun suppressing speech by using calls to social media and other internet outlets for "moderation" by politicians, activists and other agitated individuals. It becomes backdoor censorship by politicians using Facebook moderators as the speech and thought police.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:41 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:41 pm

I understand Nayeli's point about backdoor censorship. There's a solution. Don't post anything online. With the exception of within our four walls, none of us get to call the shots the way we want. Funny how that works.


resident
Registered user
Stanford
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:52 pm
resident, Stanford
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 1:52 pm

Challenge - Let's assume that Facebook (or Google) will not stop doing what they are doing because it is how they make money. We can't shame or blame people like Mark Z who wants to make money. But you can change the rules by which they can make money.
So, what are the possible ways in which the government can regulate how Facebook operates?



resident
Registered user
Stanford
on Oct 18, 2021 at 2:07 pm
resident, Stanford
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 2:07 pm

Let's use the analogy of the internet as a worldwide information highway enabled by the US government. How should it regulate travel on the WWW so that it is safe for our children and for democracy, without becoming big brother and without stifling innovation ? Any ideas?


Denise6
Registered user
Los Altos Hills
on Oct 18, 2021 at 2:11 pm
Denise6, Los Altos Hills
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 2:11 pm

Protesting is one thing. This is harassment of his family and neighbors. What if his children were at home? Unacceptable. Don’t use Facebook. Walk away. It’s easy to do


Fr0hickey
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Oct 18, 2021 at 2:57 pm
Fr0hickey, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 2:57 pm

I agree. It is not appropriate to protest at a private residence. Do it at Facebook HQ.
However, I am not surprised with this tactic. The left often uses this against others. Remember the confrontations at restaurants? How about filming Sen Sinema at a restroom? This is standard behavior. Even Maxine Waters said so. “ If you see anybody from that cabinet in a restaurant, in a department store, at a gasoline station, you get out and you create a crowd, and you push back on them, and you tell them they’re not welcome anymore, anywhere.”
When will Code Pink and Raging Grannies start using bullhorns, floodlights and loudspeakers at night?


Anonymous
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Oct 18, 2021 at 4:11 pm
Anonymous, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 4:11 pm

What is the “Freedom Socialist Party?” See photo which includes car with this label.
I don’t use Facebook but I wonder at the motives of the “Freedom Socialist Party.”
And yes, if you don’t like it, you don’t have to use it (fB). Sheesh.
These people ^ should have no say in whether Zuck is fired.
My point is I’d like to see Facebook split up - that’s all.


Mikey Palo Alto
Registered user
Midtown
on Oct 18, 2021 at 4:52 pm
Mikey Palo Alto, Midtown
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 4:52 pm

While I generally agree that protestors should not target private residences or families, I can also understand that guerrilla tactics are called for when Facebook has so blatantly invaded its users' privacy... and it's not a case of "if you don't like Facebook" don't use the platform. The issue is enabling the proliferation of fake news for profit... that's a sociopolitical issue that transcends 'change the channel.' Facebook is doing what for-profit companies do in a capitalist democracy... it's in their nature. That's why capitalism is increasingly becoming an anachronism in the age of social media... the wheels that can afford to squeak the loudest, get the most attention... with truth and reason being an afterthought. Ironically, this is the most politically unifying issue in the country, if not the world. To paraphrase Jack Nicolson, we "can't handle the truth" so let's let big tech put as much ingenuity into finding an algorithm that parses truth and untruth as they do in just opening the floodgates and collecting a toll each time someone passes go. Until they do, we need to slap their hands... in public or in private. Till they get it.


Samuel L
Registered user
Meadow Park
on Oct 18, 2021 at 6:44 pm
Samuel L, Meadow Park
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 6:44 pm

If you're not willing to delete your Facebook account, you're part of the problem.

Facebook is not the only online community forum out there.

Typical virtue signaling. "We don't like what you're doing and we're going to let people know that we're socially conscious. OK, now let me organize this protest against Zuckerberg. Just need to log into Facebook."


Paly02
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Oct 18, 2021 at 8:02 pm
Paly02, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Oct 18, 2021 at 8:02 pm

I'm just surprised there haven't been MORE protests at his house


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Oct 19, 2021 at 11:53 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Oct 19, 2021 at 11:53 am

Back in the day people went to work in a building where they were provided a company-owned computer on a company managed server system. People did not do personal work on those computers. And at their own risk because they are monitored by the company server systems which run all night. So what we have today is a hodge-podge of people on computers which may be their personal computers and they are not on a company server. Sitting at home they are doing personal work, and complaining about their company and CEO and getting paid to do it.
All of these loose cannons are sitting at the coffee shops to get wi-fi. And trying to co-opted time on other people's server time. If someone gets your email address then they are on their way into your paid for AT&T account.

Time to get people back into work on company-owned computers and comnpany server systems. People need to do their peronal work on their own computers at home. And pay for a personal account with whoever is the local providor.

Hey high tech - you did this to yourselves. Your employees are running loose and highjacking all types of strange effort to get their own time in on their agendas.
And depending on who they work for their agenda may be spying on your company and it's overall business plan.

I like FB and keep in touch with my friends - not part of my agenda to keep stirring the pot with activist grievances. But recently there are invaders who are coopting my privacy.


Roberta Lancaster
Registered user
Menlo Park
on Oct 19, 2021 at 12:04 pm
Roberta Lancaster, Menlo Park
Registered user
on Oct 19, 2021 at 12:04 pm

Common sense would dictate that if one has an issue with either Facebook or Mark Zuckerberg, simply refrain from using or perusing Facebook.

With a significant loss in online viewership, perhaps he might mend his questionable ways.

But we all know that this is not going to happen because countless Facebook users are either self-promoting narcissists or curious followers of the absurd.


Chuck
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Oct 19, 2021 at 5:23 pm
Chuck , Crescent Park
Registered user
on Oct 19, 2021 at 5:23 pm

I wish these people would protest against seemingly increasing crime in California, including Palo Alto.

I think even the most hardened criminals wouldn’t dare getting into a confrontation especially physical one with these burly powerful looking protesters.


Anonymous
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Oct 20, 2021 at 11:47 am
Anonymous, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Oct 20, 2021 at 11:47 am

Well said, Roberta and Chuck.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Oct 21, 2021 at 11:21 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Oct 21, 2021 at 11:21 am

Article in the paper says that FB is going to change it's name. Name will more accurately describe their current business model.

The current business model includes many friends who have had their site hacked - get a new friend request for someone who you are already friends with? Fb just told me about the number of sites that use my name. These are obvious issues concerning privacy and security which they are well aware of. And when I sign on it asks if I would like to set up additional sites. And I can delete my current valid site any time. Gee Thanks.

So all of the FB people do not go into work in a building that has a server for the use of the company owned computers. They are running amuck looking for server time.

I talked to the City Of Palo Alto to someone who is working from home. they indicated that the city provided a computer for home use. What server is it on? Does the city have a protected server for when people call in the on-line payments?

How about all of those RV's that want to live on a residential street - they are using computers - whose servers are they on - Yours? I have watched my computer capability deteriorate due to other people trying to coopt my AT&T account.
That is one reason people are tired of this place - the local business titens are off-loading their operating costs on to the residents.


Roberta Lancaster
Registered user
Menlo Park
on Oct 21, 2021 at 12:07 pm
Roberta Lancaster, Menlo Park
Registered user
on Oct 21, 2021 at 12:07 pm

A Facebook name change is merely a marketing strategy to diffuse bad PR and an insignificant one at best.

Like changing the name of a mosquito to a housefly.

@Resident 1-Adobe Meadows/a resident of Adobe-Meadow

If you are that concerned with transient RVs using your personal router and wifi, simply choose a more private access password or refrain from sharing it with others.

It is very hard to picture a bunch of delapidated RVs parked all over various Palo Alto neighborhoods just to go online.


R. Cavendish
Registered user
another community
on Oct 21, 2021 at 12:56 pm
R. Cavendish, another community
Registered user
on Oct 21, 2021 at 12:56 pm

The 'Social Network' opened a can of moral and ethical worms and made Mark Zuckerberg a very wealthy individual.

Outside of a seemingly trivial Facebook 'name change' what's next?

Maybe something along the lines of a Facebook space-tourism venture with an eye on establishing an inter-galactic 'social network'?

Chances are (unlike Earthlings) a sizable number of 'intelligent' extraterrestrial beings probably won't fall for it.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Oct 23, 2021 at 10:30 am
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Oct 23, 2021 at 10:30 am

RV's on the streets is a Mountain View legal problem. Non-profit organizations are suing the city. ACLU is involved. A city has a budget for trash pick-up and street cleaning. Those are contracted services that the residents pay for in their utility bill. East PA has signs for street cleaning which is to help protect their sewer systems from flooding. They are vulnerable to flooding. PA is also vulnerable to flooding - I am in a flood zone requiring flood insurance. Hey Mountain View you are also vulnerable to flooding - does the ACLU even care about that? Do the non-profits care about that. That is legal issue.
Our Rv's are on El Camino next to SU - hoping to get some wi-fi from the SU? Better that a coffee shop. Roberta - Menlo Park does not have a RV problem - They have designated spaces and other wise the people can move on.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.