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When is the Newsom recall election? Maybe sooner than you think

Illustration by Anne Wernikoff, CalMatters; iStock.

Californians will almost certainly vote this year whether to throw Gov. Gavin Newsom out of office. But when?

There's surprisingly little certainty about the date of an election that has the potential to upend the leadership of the world's fifth largest economy and disrupt the lock Democrats have had on the state Capitol for the last 11 years.

The range of probable dates is shaping up as a Tuesday between mid-September and early November — with signs pointing to the likelihood of an election sooner rather than later.

One reason for the confusion is because the procedure leading up to a recall election involves a few steps that could take as much as three months or as little as a few days, depending on how the officials involved decide to roll things out.

"These processes that are remaining now are totally in the hands of Democrats. If they want to truncate it, they can truncate it. And in my estimation they should," said Garry South, a Democratic political consultant who managed campaigns for Gray Davis, the only California governor to be recalled.

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"Let's get this thing over with."

Senate Elections Committee chairperson Steve Glazer suggested the election should be held as soon as August because Newsom is doing well in the polls as the state rebounds from the COVID-19 pandemic. But it seems more likely that officials would wait until after Labor Day, when summertime distractions settle down. And recent activity at the Capitol indicates that the election will probably be called earlier than the traditional first Tuesday in November.

State finance officials and lawmakers who control the budget have already begun figuring out how much it will cost counties to conduct the election — a step they could drag into August if they wanted. Last week, the Department of Finance received cost estimates from election officials in almost all of California's 58 counties. And Sen. Nancy Skinner, the Berkeley Democrat who leads the Senate's budget committee, told reporters that she may not need the full 30 days the law gives her panel to review recall election costs because "we already know" the price tag.

County election officials said last month that putting on the recall election will cost them about $400 million, five times more than what Newsom had estimated. Similar to last November, all registered voters will receive mail ballots and counties can also offer drop-off and in-person voting.

If lawmakers include the funding for counties in the budget they'll pass by June 15 — which seems likely, since they've received the cost estimate and have a massive surplus — it could be a major indication that the election will probably be in September instead of later in the fall.

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But if the funding is not included in the budget, it means lawmakers and Newsom's finance officials could spend more of the summer analyzing the costs, thus delaying a vote. The recall law gives them lots of leeway — finance officials and the Legislature each get as long as 30 days for this phase of the process.

'The timing is more of an issue for him than it is for us.'

-Anne Dunsmore, recall campaign manager

Democratic lawmakers added more steps to California's recall process in 2017 as they unsuccessfully tried to fend off the recall of Democratic state Sen. Josh Newman of Fullerton. In addition to adding two months for the fiscal analyses, they also added six weeks for voters who signed the recall petition to remove their signatures if they want, a period that in Newsom's case ends Tuesday.

"A lot of lag was put in," said Joshua Spivak, a fellow at the Hugh L. Carey Institute for Government Reform at Wagner College in New York who lives in the Bay Area and writes the Recall Elections Blog.

"It's this change in the law that has given some uncertainty to the proceedings."

Newsom has answered questions about when he'd like the election to be held by saying it's not his decision, and he'll work hard to defeat the recall by focusing on getting Californians vaccinated and rebooting the economy. While he's been touting a return to "business as usual" when the state reopens on June 15, Newsom said Friday that he will not lift the official state of emergency on that date. The emergency status allows the state to waive certain rules and expedite federal funding even as businesses more fully reopen.

"This disease has not been extinguished," Newsom said after drawing the first winners in his vaccine lottery. "It's not taking the summer months off."

His opponents who are campaigning for the recall jumped on that comment, saying it will add fuel to their movement, which began as a conservative critique of Newsom's liberal policies but evolved to encompass voters frustrated with his pandemic-induced restrictions.

"That seals the coffin," Anne Dunsmore, a recall campaign manager, said of Newsom's decision to hold onto his emergency powers. "People don't feel that he understands the pain they've been through."

The politics of timing

Dunsmore said an election later in the fall is slightly better for recall supporters because it gives more time for candidates to jump in the race, which could attract more voters. It also allows more opportunity for Newsom to anger voters by his response to potential disasters — think wildfire, drought and power shut-offs — or his own gaffes, like the French Laundry dinner party that spiked support for the recall.

"The timing is more of an issue for him than it is for us," Dunsmore said.

Opinions vary on whether holding the election sooner is better for Newsom — or even if the date of the recall matters much. There's not really a playbook since only two governors in modern American history have faced a recall — Davis, who was booted from office in 2003, and Wisconsin's former Republican Gov. Scott Walker, who defeated a recall in 2012.

Spivak believes that Newsom would benefit if the election is held later, arguing that sufficient time to raise campaign funds helped Walker win. Newsom is already outraising recall supporters, who raised and spent most of their cash to collect signatures, and he seems poised to dominate the money race.

"The longer he has, the more he can put that money to use and overwhelm the opposition," Spivak said. "The air war hasn't started and when it does, he might have a big advantage."

Also, holding the election in early November could help Newsom by driving turnout, since voters are accustomed to voting then. On the other hand, Spivak said, holding it at an unusual date could help Newsom win more support by emphasizing that it's an irregular election and an extra cost to taxpayers.

'Watching him go over those bills with his reading glasses on, the whole room hung heavy with the specter of the recall.'

-Garry South, campaign manager for recalled Gov. Gray Davis

South says that Newsom would be better off if the election were sooner — before he faces the intense period of signing and vetoing bills from Sept. 11 to Oct. 11. His decisions could anger some voters. And an election scheduled soon after could cause more scrutiny of whether it is influencing how Newsom evaluates bills involving a range of powerful interests.

"That was a huge mess for us in 2003," South said, because Davis faced a recall on Oct. 7.

"Watching him go over those bills with his reading glasses on, the whole room hung heavy with the specter of the recall."

Ultimately, South said, it prompted Davis to sign legislation he'd previously vetoed, and veto some bills he otherwise wouldn't. For instance, just before the recall, Davis signed a bill to give driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants — something he had vetoed twice before, South said. The vetoes had cost Davis the endorsement of the Legislature's powerful Latino Caucus in an earlier election, and he didn't want to risk that again during the recall.

"Even if Newsom looked at all those thousand bills and vetoed and signed them all in good faith — he will be accused by both the right and the left of playing politics," South said.

Gov. Gavin Newsom addresses reporters on a new state incentive for the reopening of schools at Barron Park Elementary in Palo Alto on March 2, 2021. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

The decision on the election date falls to Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, a Democrat and Newsom ally. The recall law says she must call the election for between 60 and 80 days after Secretary of State Shirley Weber — who was appointed by Newsom — certifies that enough people have signed the recall petition to trigger an election, which follows the Legislature's cost analysis.

"Frankly, it will probably be somewhere in the middle," Kounalakis said in an interview. "It is my job to set this date within that narrow window, in a way that serves the public interest, and that is what I will do."

One thing Kounalakis said she won't do? Follow in the footsteps of Cruz Bustamante, who held her position when Davis was recalled and decided to run right after calling the election.

"I'm absolutely not going to put my name on the recall ballot," she said.

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When is the Newsom recall election? Maybe sooner than you think

by / CalMatters

Uploaded: Mon, Jun 7, 2021, 3:10 pm

Californians will almost certainly vote this year whether to throw Gov. Gavin Newsom out of office. But when?

There's surprisingly little certainty about the date of an election that has the potential to upend the leadership of the world's fifth largest economy and disrupt the lock Democrats have had on the state Capitol for the last 11 years.

The range of probable dates is shaping up as a Tuesday between mid-September and early November — with signs pointing to the likelihood of an election sooner rather than later.

One reason for the confusion is because the procedure leading up to a recall election involves a few steps that could take as much as three months or as little as a few days, depending on how the officials involved decide to roll things out.

"These processes that are remaining now are totally in the hands of Democrats. If they want to truncate it, they can truncate it. And in my estimation they should," said Garry South, a Democratic political consultant who managed campaigns for Gray Davis, the only California governor to be recalled.

"Let's get this thing over with."

Senate Elections Committee chairperson Steve Glazer suggested the election should be held as soon as August because Newsom is doing well in the polls as the state rebounds from the COVID-19 pandemic. But it seems more likely that officials would wait until after Labor Day, when summertime distractions settle down. And recent activity at the Capitol indicates that the election will probably be called earlier than the traditional first Tuesday in November.

State finance officials and lawmakers who control the budget have already begun figuring out how much it will cost counties to conduct the election — a step they could drag into August if they wanted. Last week, the Department of Finance received cost estimates from election officials in almost all of California's 58 counties. And Sen. Nancy Skinner, the Berkeley Democrat who leads the Senate's budget committee, told reporters that she may not need the full 30 days the law gives her panel to review recall election costs because "we already know" the price tag.

County election officials said last month that putting on the recall election will cost them about $400 million, five times more than what Newsom had estimated. Similar to last November, all registered voters will receive mail ballots and counties can also offer drop-off and in-person voting.

If lawmakers include the funding for counties in the budget they'll pass by June 15 — which seems likely, since they've received the cost estimate and have a massive surplus — it could be a major indication that the election will probably be in September instead of later in the fall.

But if the funding is not included in the budget, it means lawmakers and Newsom's finance officials could spend more of the summer analyzing the costs, thus delaying a vote. The recall law gives them lots of leeway — finance officials and the Legislature each get as long as 30 days for this phase of the process.

Democratic lawmakers added more steps to California's recall process in 2017 as they unsuccessfully tried to fend off the recall of Democratic state Sen. Josh Newman of Fullerton. In addition to adding two months for the fiscal analyses, they also added six weeks for voters who signed the recall petition to remove their signatures if they want, a period that in Newsom's case ends Tuesday.

"A lot of lag was put in," said Joshua Spivak, a fellow at the Hugh L. Carey Institute for Government Reform at Wagner College in New York who lives in the Bay Area and writes the Recall Elections Blog.

"It's this change in the law that has given some uncertainty to the proceedings."

Newsom has answered questions about when he'd like the election to be held by saying it's not his decision, and he'll work hard to defeat the recall by focusing on getting Californians vaccinated and rebooting the economy. While he's been touting a return to "business as usual" when the state reopens on June 15, Newsom said Friday that he will not lift the official state of emergency on that date. The emergency status allows the state to waive certain rules and expedite federal funding even as businesses more fully reopen.

"This disease has not been extinguished," Newsom said after drawing the first winners in his vaccine lottery. "It's not taking the summer months off."

His opponents who are campaigning for the recall jumped on that comment, saying it will add fuel to their movement, which began as a conservative critique of Newsom's liberal policies but evolved to encompass voters frustrated with his pandemic-induced restrictions.

"That seals the coffin," Anne Dunsmore, a recall campaign manager, said of Newsom's decision to hold onto his emergency powers. "People don't feel that he understands the pain they've been through."

Dunsmore said an election later in the fall is slightly better for recall supporters because it gives more time for candidates to jump in the race, which could attract more voters. It also allows more opportunity for Newsom to anger voters by his response to potential disasters — think wildfire, drought and power shut-offs — or his own gaffes, like the French Laundry dinner party that spiked support for the recall.

"The timing is more of an issue for him than it is for us," Dunsmore said.

Opinions vary on whether holding the election sooner is better for Newsom — or even if the date of the recall matters much. There's not really a playbook since only two governors in modern American history have faced a recall — Davis, who was booted from office in 2003, and Wisconsin's former Republican Gov. Scott Walker, who defeated a recall in 2012.

Spivak believes that Newsom would benefit if the election is held later, arguing that sufficient time to raise campaign funds helped Walker win. Newsom is already outraising recall supporters, who raised and spent most of their cash to collect signatures, and he seems poised to dominate the money race.

"The longer he has, the more he can put that money to use and overwhelm the opposition," Spivak said. "The air war hasn't started and when it does, he might have a big advantage."

Also, holding the election in early November could help Newsom by driving turnout, since voters are accustomed to voting then. On the other hand, Spivak said, holding it at an unusual date could help Newsom win more support by emphasizing that it's an irregular election and an extra cost to taxpayers.

South says that Newsom would be better off if the election were sooner — before he faces the intense period of signing and vetoing bills from Sept. 11 to Oct. 11. His decisions could anger some voters. And an election scheduled soon after could cause more scrutiny of whether it is influencing how Newsom evaluates bills involving a range of powerful interests.

"That was a huge mess for us in 2003," South said, because Davis faced a recall on Oct. 7.

"Watching him go over those bills with his reading glasses on, the whole room hung heavy with the specter of the recall."

Ultimately, South said, it prompted Davis to sign legislation he'd previously vetoed, and veto some bills he otherwise wouldn't. For instance, just before the recall, Davis signed a bill to give driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants — something he had vetoed twice before, South said. The vetoes had cost Davis the endorsement of the Legislature's powerful Latino Caucus in an earlier election, and he didn't want to risk that again during the recall.

"Even if Newsom looked at all those thousand bills and vetoed and signed them all in good faith — he will be accused by both the right and the left of playing politics," South said.

The decision on the election date falls to Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, a Democrat and Newsom ally. The recall law says she must call the election for between 60 and 80 days after Secretary of State Shirley Weber — who was appointed by Newsom — certifies that enough people have signed the recall petition to trigger an election, which follows the Legislature's cost analysis.

"Frankly, it will probably be somewhere in the middle," Kounalakis said in an interview. "It is my job to set this date within that narrow window, in a way that serves the public interest, and that is what I will do."

One thing Kounalakis said she won't do? Follow in the footsteps of Cruz Bustamante, who held her position when Davis was recalled and decided to run right after calling the election.

"I'm absolutely not going to put my name on the recall ballot," she said.

Email Laurel Rosenhall at [email protected]

CALmatters.org is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media venture explaining California's policies and politics.

Comments

Sophie
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 8, 2021 at 11:18 am
Sophie, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 11:18 am

Can't wait to cast my ballot in favour of recalling Newsom!


Merilee Steinman
Registered user
Menlo Park
on Jun 8, 2021 at 11:34 am
Merilee Steinman, Menlo Park
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 11:34 am

Gavin Newsome despite his flaws will prevail because the Republicans do not have a worthwhile opponent.

Kevin Falcouner of San Diego is not universally admired and Caitlan Jenner will not be taken seriously as a CA gubenatorial candidate.

Gavin Newsome is a shoo-in.


What Will They Do Next
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Jun 8, 2021 at 11:41 am
What Will They Do Next, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 11:41 am

Not soon enough. His thirst for power needs to be stopped now.


Novelera
Registered user
Midtown
on Jun 8, 2021 at 11:58 am
Novelera, Midtown
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 11:58 am

Sigh. I knew by the headline that when I scrolled down the trolls would already be there. Newsom has done a fantastic job keeping California's COVID deaths low as a percentage of population. The vaccine rollout has been successful.

The idiot in the bear commercial and the trans woman from a reality show are hardly fit to replace him.


peppered
Registered user
Community Center
on Jun 8, 2021 at 12:23 pm
peppered, Community Center
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 12:23 pm

Recall is not gonna happen.
For a variety of reasons.
Not least of which:
We won't allow a Trump-sucking Republican to appoint a right-wing nut and flip the Senate if Feinstein leaves before her term is up.


Sophie
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 8, 2021 at 1:45 pm
Sophie, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 1:45 pm

Fraudster in California were able to get probably 30 billion $ from our taxes - my hairdresser did not get a penny despite sending in numerous applications for financial help

"In California, this is unquestionably the largest fraud against public agencies in our history,"
Officials in California, one of the only states to launch a review of the Covid-19 relief program, said they have tallied $11 billion stolen from taxpayers so far, but the total figure could be as high as $30 billion, or 27 percent.
Web Link


Sophie
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 8, 2021 at 1:50 pm
Sophie, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 1:50 pm

Wondering why California is having a drought again even if reservoirs werde filled?

“Are we having a dry year? Yes,” Diener says. “That is normal for us. Should we be having water shortages in the start of our second dry year? No. Our reservoirs were designed to provide a steady five year supply for all users, and were filled to the top in June 2019.”

Web Link


What Will They Do Next
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Jun 8, 2021 at 2:09 pm
What Will They Do Next, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 2:09 pm

“To anger a conservative, lie to him. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.” Newsom is a power thirsty liberal who has as a goal, POTUS.


Sophie
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 8, 2021 at 2:20 pm
Sophie, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 2:20 pm

As for comparing the Covid response of California (schools closed, lots of businesses ruined) to Florida (schools were open, economy is doing a lot better):

"California ordered strict lockdowns, while Florida 'trusted common sense' and now both have nearly identical case rates, hospitalizations and deaths"

Web Link


Sophie
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 8, 2021 at 5:14 pm
Sophie, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 5:14 pm

Big Tech is buying Newsom

"California Gov. Gavin Newsom can raise an unlimited amount of money as he attempts to survive a recall election later this year, and he is pulling in massive sums of money from technology executives.
At the end of May, he pulled in $3 million — by far the largest sum of money spent on the recall on either side — from Netflix founder Reed Hastings. On Tuesday, a new filing from the California Secretary of State's office showed that he received an additional $300,000 from tech titans."
Web Link


AlexDeLarge
Registered user
Midtown
on Jun 8, 2021 at 5:29 pm
AlexDeLarge, Midtown
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 5:29 pm

Newsom is the poster boy for the Peter Principle, he has almost risen to the level of his incompetence but still has a way to go, we're doomed.


Dusty Pierce
Registered user
Barron Park
on Jun 8, 2021 at 6:39 pm
Dusty Pierce, Barron Park
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 6:39 pm

> Newsom is a power thirsty liberal who has as a goal, POTUS.

^ A stretch of the imagination.

> California Gov. Gavin Newsom can raise an unlimited amount of money as he attempts to survive a recall election later this year, and he is pulling in massive sums of money from technology executives.

^ Along with the 'beautiful people' in Hollywood.

Newsome cannot be held accountable for the drought...that is a climate change/global warming issue.

On the other hand, there is much that he needs to answer for.


The Voice of Palo Alto
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2021 at 7:44 pm
The Voice of Palo Alto, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2021 at 7:44 pm

@Sophie-The California vs. Florida argument with Covid has gotten tired. From the link you posted, here were the numbers:
1. Adjusting for population, Florida has 5,043 COVID-19 cases and 91 deaths per 100,000 residents while California has about 4,595 cases and 51 deaths per 100,000
2. Historically, Florida was reporting about 44 hospitalizations per 100,000 while California has about 22 per 100,000,

That’s 91 deaths in Florida to 51 in California and 44 hospitalizations in Florida to 22 in California and about 4000 less cases and you are using that link as “your evidence” to recall Newsom! No. Sorry, Florida did worse than California and they have less people living there so they had less people to infect. All of DeSantis’ policies “for the economy” were reckless and dangerous. All people who actually believe any of this nonsense, and all people that protested wearing a mask and made his job harder should apologize to Newsom.

Not to mention it’s very likely DeSantis was doctoring those already horrible Covid numbers as Rebekah Jones, who many people dismissed as a “crook” or whatever because suddenly and conveniently her house was raided, was just granted whistleblower status!

Web Link

Like mostly all of the current Republican leadership DeSantis is awful. Newsom will not be recalled and California will stay BLUE. Sorry! Wishful thinking Republicans! Next, blaming Newsom for the drought is just, quite frankly, insane nonsense.

Finally, can posters please spell Newsom’s name correctly? It makes your comment look a little silly right up front when you add the extra “e” on the end of his name and can’t even spell it correctly.
@WWTDN-Another glib comment from you. Sigh. So what if he has a goal of being President? So do Republican Governors such as the aforementioned DeSantis. What’s wrong with setting a goal? Don’t vote for him but he can run for President. I’m sorry about your disorder.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Jun 9, 2021 at 8:00 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Jun 9, 2021 at 8:00 am

Present it to the voters, accept the results and move on. Just get it done. This is tiresome.


Online Name
Registered user
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 9, 2021 at 8:30 am
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
Registered user
on Jun 9, 2021 at 8:30 am

The GOP just unanimously defeated the Paycheck Fairness Act aimed at ending gender-based pay discrimination just as they've killed the Violence Against Women Act, the investigation into the Jan. 6th insurrection, voter rights protection, etc. etc. They're continuing their reflexive opposition to anything and everything Biden proposes just like they proudly did with Obama.

@Voice of Palo Alto, thanks for noting the consistent misspelling of Newsom's name. It's the same ignorant tactic used in incorrectly calling it the Democrat Party instead of the Democratic Party.

The US can't risk losing another Senate seat by recalling Newsom.

The Democrats aren't perfect but they aren't blatant obstructionists incapable of doing anything to SOLVE problems.


Luwanda Jeffries
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on Jun 9, 2021 at 4:22 pm
Luwanda Jeffries, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on Jun 9, 2021 at 4:22 pm

Gavin Newsom will easily carry the African American vote in California.

There are very few black people who voted Republican unless they are wealthy conservatives in denial of their ethnicity.


Robert Deacon
Registered user
Woodside
on Jun 10, 2021 at 8:47 am
Robert Deacon, Woodside
Registered user
on Jun 10, 2021 at 8:47 am

Newsom is a D+ California Governor at best...how could he even fathom rising above that grade as a U.S. President?


Shawonda Jefferson
Registered user
another community
on Jun 10, 2021 at 12:19 pm
Shawonda Jefferson, another community
Registered user
on Jun 10, 2021 at 12:19 pm

Governor Newsome will secure re-election EASILY based on the African-American, Hispanic-American, and Asian-American voting bloc alone.

White Republicans still stubbornly clinging to a racist Trump agenda are falling by the wayside as most of America now views them as kooks.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Jun 11, 2021 at 3:34 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Jun 11, 2021 at 3:34 pm

WOW online - what problem has been solved? We were 100% energy efficient and now that is being stripped away at the same time the pipeline from Russia was approved by Biden. That is who your Russian Connection is. His son gets paid by Ukraine and China. That is US tax dollars repurposed. So your gas prices are going up. Your taxes will go up. The immigrants are running over the border and Newsom is going to give them free stuff while our US citizens are living in tent cities. The US taxpayer is getting hung out to dry here.

Shawonda you do not seem to understand voting blocks. Start with the contributors from EPA who do not read their own cities info on the web - or what their city concerns are. Start with your own city - go to council meetings and clean your own house first.


Helena Karteris
Registered user
Menlo Park
on Jun 13, 2021 at 9:56 am
Helena Karteris, Menlo Park
Registered user
on Jun 13, 2021 at 9:56 am

Like FDR and LBJ, Biden and Newsome are progressive Democrats striving to rebuild and improve America and California via various governmental subsidization measures.

When was the last time the Republicans ever enacted legislation on behalf of the common man?

The Republicans are little more than a safety blanket for wealthy white voters and given its current embrace of right-wing lunacy, the party will either bifurcate or disappear altogether over time.

And then we will finally have only progressive vs moderate legislative and political platforms in America.

Conservatives need not apply for key roles in the New America.


Dex/Covid-Homeless Survivor
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 13, 2021 at 10:49 am
Dex/Covid-Homeless Survivor, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 13, 2021 at 10:49 am

I rely heavily upon food stamps, welfare assistance, and my complimentary Obama smartphone just to barely get by during these tough times.

The Republicans as a rule do not endorse these types of government assistance programs for the needy and only seem to care about big business and protecting rich people from paying exorbitant income taxes.

The saintly Democrats tend to differ in their perspectives and are striving to provide even more for the truly needy.

Theirs is a good measure as the Republican claims of impending inflation and mass unemployment are unfounded.


Mabel Carlton
Registered user
another community
on Jun 13, 2021 at 12:09 pm
Mabel Carlton, another community
Registered user
on Jun 13, 2021 at 12:09 pm

The Democrats can hardly be considered 'saintly' but they do seem to have more societal compassion than the Republicans.


It.is.what.it.is
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 13, 2021 at 12:18 pm
It.is.what.it.is, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 13, 2021 at 12:18 pm

Who is going to pay for all the illegal immigration that is coming through the open borders? Housing, education, food? All of us. Think before you vote for a Democrat next time. When crime and homelessness hits your surroundings, it won't leave. When prisons are closed and felons are on the streets, you or your family may be harmed. When a homeless person is parked in front of your house, and there are so many that law enforcement can't kick them out, you'll have voter regret (too late). When you retire with less money because so much went to the homeless and illegal immigrants, how will you feel? Some people are so ignorant, they can't understand the situation unless it's in front of their faces and hits their pocketbooks. By that point, it's too late.

The Democrats are a train wreck. Newsom closed businesses of hard-working Californians with the extended lockdown. He still says CA is in a state of emergency when our state has the lowest COVID rates. He kept schools closed while his children were attending private schools. He went out to dinner when the rest of us were on lockdown. The Democrats only pretend to care about people. [Portion removed.]


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