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'We have a world that needs changing': Hundreds join racial justice vigil for George Floyd in Palo Alto

To mark anniversary of Floyd's death, spiritual leaders urge people to have courage to stand up for the oppressed, victimized

The Rev. Kaloma Smith exhorts people at a prayer vigil for George Floyd on May 22, 2021, in Palo Alto to boldly stand up for those who are oppressed. Photo by Jocelyn Dong.

With hands lifted up and voices crying out, leaders of numerous Midpeninsula churches on Saturday led a spiritual rally outside Palo Alto City Hall to mark one year since the murder of George Floyd.

It was the same plaza to which outraged residents marched last summer to condemn police brutality and urge reform following the May 25, 2020, murder of Floyd, who was pinned under the knee of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin and unable to breathe for more than nine minutes.

There are times for marches and protests, but there's also a time for prayer, Palo Alto Vineyard Church Pastor Susan Van Riesen told the diverse crowd of several hundred people, who stood in the bright, late-afternoon sunshine.

NBA basketball player Jeremy Lin leads a prayer at a spiritual rally outside of Palo Alto City Hall on May 22, 2021. Photo by Jocelyn Dong.

Racial injustice "is not just a societal issue or a political issue or a systemic issue. It is those things. But … it is (also) a spiritual issue, one that all people of faith ought to engage (in) and take seriously."

At times, the event sounded like a revival, as attendees shouted "Amen!" and "Bring it!" to encourage the speakers. Among those speaking was NBA basketball player Jeremy Lin, who grew up in Palo Alto and has spoken openly about his Christian faith. He shared a prayer for peace in the face of racism and discrimination.

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"Give peace today to all of us who suffer mistreatment and wrongdoing, as members of communities targeted by hatred. Release your peace to flood the hearts of the confused, fearful, angry, outraged and those who feel forgotten and invisible. ... Allow the work of peace to begin within us," Lin said.

In contrast to the Black Lives Matters protests that filled local streets last year, Saturday's rally didn't call for specific governmental changes but focused more on urging attendees to continue the momentum of the past year by boldly speaking out against wrongs and standing up for those who are victimized.

The Rev. Kaloma Smith of University AME Zion Church in Palo Alto exhorted attendees to be courageous in the quest for justice.

"I need the believers of God not to fight on your own energy, but to lean into God and know that he's going to empower you," he said, to applause and shouts from the crowd, "because we have a world that needs changing."

"God … is going to require believers that are absolutely bold in their declaration, bold in calling for justice, bold in standing for issues, bold in standing for the brokenhearted, bold in standing for those that are oppressed and marginalized. Those that will stand in a city hall … and say 'We need justice in this world.'"

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Amid the gathering at King Plaza, listening to Smith and the others, were Onyi Ozoma and Seneca Friend, who said they had been walking by and were drawn to the event by the sound of music.

Onyi Ozoma and Seneca Friend, at a rally held in downtown Palo Alto on May 22, 2021, say that some progress has been made since George Floyd's death in the quest for racial justice in America, but more action still needs to be taken. Photo by Jocelyn Dong.

They reflected on progress toward racial equality that has been made since last summer and on the continuing need for improvement.

"There's definitely been progress in terms of inducing action. I think that is the biggest thing," Ozoma said, citing the rethinking of funding for law enforcement agencies and structural changes that have been made within institutions. "There's progress in that regard, but definitely still it's early on the path."

Friend agreed that progress has been achieved but noted that it took Floyd's death for some people to realize that action was desperately needed.

"We had a conversation with some other friends a few weeks ago who said the murder of George Floyd was really a wake-up call to them — like, 'Oh, racism still exists,'" Friend said. "And that was something that caused them to be a little bit more proactive and critical in their thinking and in how they treat other people.

"And so I do believe that progress is being made, in that people are being more vocal. People are doing things; people are organizing in great ways," Friend said. "So I'm excited and hopeful."

For many, one reassurance that police brutality will not continue to go unpunished was the April 21 conviction of Chauvin of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Floyd, who pleaded more than two dozen times "I can't breathe" before he lost consciousness and died.

Chauvin faces up to 40 years in prison and is scheduled to be sentenced in June, although his attorney has requested a new trial, alleging Chauvin had been denied a fair trial.

Local elected leaders in the past year have examined policing practices with the aim of curbing the use of excessive force and promoting de-escalation of situations in order to reduce the number of deadly officer-involved shootings.

The Palo Alto City Council reviewed and revised use-of-force policies in the Police Department and expanded a ban on chokeholds and carotid holds to include any restraint technique that is "deliberately applied for the purpose of restricting blood flow or air flow to the head or neck."

Some in the crowd of a couple hundred attendees of a prayer vigil in memory of George Floyd in downtown Palo Alto on May 22, 2021, raised their hands and clapped to music. Photo by Jocelyn Dong.

The revised policy also includes a new section on de-escalation techniques, including a list of alternatives to force that officers should consider, such as taking "as much time as reasonably necessary to resolve the incident, without having to use force, if feasible."

The city has also supported the creation of public art to signal its commitment to racial justice and commissioned a history of Black and brown communities in Palo Alto, a report that the Human Relations Commission presented earlier this year. The city is also reviewing its hiring practices and is planning to launch "community circles" that will allow residents to meet in small groups to talk about race.

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Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner contributed to this report.

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Jocelyn Dong is the editor of the Palo Alto Weekly/PaloAltoOnline.com and editorial director for the Weekly's parent company, Embarcadero Media. Read more >>

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'We have a world that needs changing': Hundreds join racial justice vigil for George Floyd in Palo Alto

To mark anniversary of Floyd's death, spiritual leaders urge people to have courage to stand up for the oppressed, victimized

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Sun, May 23, 2021, 1:56 am

With hands lifted up and voices crying out, leaders of numerous Midpeninsula churches on Saturday led a spiritual rally outside Palo Alto City Hall to mark one year since the murder of George Floyd.

It was the same plaza to which outraged residents marched last summer to condemn police brutality and urge reform following the May 25, 2020, murder of Floyd, who was pinned under the knee of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin and unable to breathe for more than nine minutes.

There are times for marches and protests, but there's also a time for prayer, Palo Alto Vineyard Church Pastor Susan Van Riesen told the diverse crowd of several hundred people, who stood in the bright, late-afternoon sunshine.

Racial injustice "is not just a societal issue or a political issue or a systemic issue. It is those things. But … it is (also) a spiritual issue, one that all people of faith ought to engage (in) and take seriously."

At times, the event sounded like a revival, as attendees shouted "Amen!" and "Bring it!" to encourage the speakers. Among those speaking was NBA basketball player Jeremy Lin, who grew up in Palo Alto and has spoken openly about his Christian faith. He shared a prayer for peace in the face of racism and discrimination.

"Give peace today to all of us who suffer mistreatment and wrongdoing, as members of communities targeted by hatred. Release your peace to flood the hearts of the confused, fearful, angry, outraged and those who feel forgotten and invisible. ... Allow the work of peace to begin within us," Lin said.

In contrast to the Black Lives Matters protests that filled local streets last year, Saturday's rally didn't call for specific governmental changes but focused more on urging attendees to continue the momentum of the past year by boldly speaking out against wrongs and standing up for those who are victimized.

The Rev. Kaloma Smith of University AME Zion Church in Palo Alto exhorted attendees to be courageous in the quest for justice.

"I need the believers of God not to fight on your own energy, but to lean into God and know that he's going to empower you," he said, to applause and shouts from the crowd, "because we have a world that needs changing."

"God … is going to require believers that are absolutely bold in their declaration, bold in calling for justice, bold in standing for issues, bold in standing for the brokenhearted, bold in standing for those that are oppressed and marginalized. Those that will stand in a city hall … and say 'We need justice in this world.'"

Amid the gathering at King Plaza, listening to Smith and the others, were Onyi Ozoma and Seneca Friend, who said they had been walking by and were drawn to the event by the sound of music.

They reflected on progress toward racial equality that has been made since last summer and on the continuing need for improvement.

"There's definitely been progress in terms of inducing action. I think that is the biggest thing," Ozoma said, citing the rethinking of funding for law enforcement agencies and structural changes that have been made within institutions. "There's progress in that regard, but definitely still it's early on the path."

Friend agreed that progress has been achieved but noted that it took Floyd's death for some people to realize that action was desperately needed.

"We had a conversation with some other friends a few weeks ago who said the murder of George Floyd was really a wake-up call to them — like, 'Oh, racism still exists,'" Friend said. "And that was something that caused them to be a little bit more proactive and critical in their thinking and in how they treat other people.

"And so I do believe that progress is being made, in that people are being more vocal. People are doing things; people are organizing in great ways," Friend said. "So I'm excited and hopeful."

For many, one reassurance that police brutality will not continue to go unpunished was the April 21 conviction of Chauvin of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Floyd, who pleaded more than two dozen times "I can't breathe" before he lost consciousness and died.

Chauvin faces up to 40 years in prison and is scheduled to be sentenced in June, although his attorney has requested a new trial, alleging Chauvin had been denied a fair trial.

Local elected leaders in the past year have examined policing practices with the aim of curbing the use of excessive force and promoting de-escalation of situations in order to reduce the number of deadly officer-involved shootings.

The Palo Alto City Council reviewed and revised use-of-force policies in the Police Department and expanded a ban on chokeholds and carotid holds to include any restraint technique that is "deliberately applied for the purpose of restricting blood flow or air flow to the head or neck."

The revised policy also includes a new section on de-escalation techniques, including a list of alternatives to force that officers should consider, such as taking "as much time as reasonably necessary to resolve the incident, without having to use force, if feasible."

The city has also supported the creation of public art to signal its commitment to racial justice and commissioned a history of Black and brown communities in Palo Alto, a report that the Human Relations Commission presented earlier this year. The city is also reviewing its hiring practices and is planning to launch "community circles" that will allow residents to meet in small groups to talk about race.

Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner contributed to this report.

Comments

Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on May 23, 2021 at 6:54 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on May 23, 2021 at 6:54 am

A world that needs changing includes getting to the root of the problem. Please stop committing crimes under the influence of alcohol and drugs. And if you are foolish enough to do so, please stop resisting arrest. It might save your own life. Prayers.


James Waters Ph.D.
Registered user
Stanford
on May 23, 2021 at 8:06 am
James Waters Ph.D., Stanford
Registered user
on May 23, 2021 at 8:06 am

"getting to the root of the problem...please stop resisting arrest. It might save your own life."

Attempting to flee while being stopped and potentially arrested for an outstanding bench warrant has also contributed to many of these tragic and unfortunate police-related shootings.

While the police need to exercise further constraint in these highly volatile situations, anyone resisting arrest or attempting to flee will provide further incentives on the part of the police to take certain actions, some questionable.

It is advisable to cooperate with the police (even if doing so means getting hauled off to county jail) and later addressing the issue or conflict in a court of law.

Using some common sense can be a lifesaver.


The Good Neighbor
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 23, 2021 at 4:00 pm
The Good Neighbor, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 23, 2021 at 4:00 pm

° Why did God kill George Floyd? He did not. We did.

The question is...why DIDN'T God protect George Floyd (and other victims) from police brutality?

And the same can be said of the Jewish people during the Holocaust and the Armenian genocide.

Why believe in something that doesn't deliver?


Eppie Rosenberg
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 23, 2021 at 9:25 pm
Eppie Rosenberg, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 23, 2021 at 9:25 pm

God is simply a mathematical algorithm.

What some call a miracle is simply a statistical anomaly predicated on probability and chance.

The self-proclained caliphates and tele-evangelists might beg to differ but there is big money in selling false hopes.



Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on May 24, 2021 at 9:44 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 9:44 am

Using common sense IS a lifesaver, but anyone resisting arrest is lacking common sense, or they wouldn't be doing so. There are things that need to be addressed in a court of law (warrants, etc.) but resisting arrest happens because someone doesn't want to be arrested, and he/she has an attitude towards the police. That's reality.


Richard Peck
Registered user
Menlo Park
on May 24, 2021 at 9:56 am
Richard Peck, Menlo Park
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 9:56 am

When confronted by a hostile force or a threatening situation, the natural response is to either fight or flee.

It is oftentimes not a matter of lacking common sense but one of survival.

Common sense dictates that racist white police officers will further antagonize, brutalize, and euthanize black people if provided an opportunity.

To acquiesce or surrender is no longer an option.

BLM


Consider Your Options.
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 24, 2021 at 11:21 am
Consider Your Options. , Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 11:21 am

[Portion removed.] The officer who murdered Mr. Floyd has been found guilty. There are many good police officers and other people who do not condone what happened there. The officer exercised unnecessary force fueled by prejudice. Mr. Floyd struggled because a knee was on his neck. He could not breathe. I would do the same.

To others, can we please keep this thread focused on the subject of the vigil--which was to bring people together to address the problem of prejudice and its terrible outcomes? If you want to have a religious debate, please start anther thread. Thank you.

I hope we will take this moment to examine the prejudices in our own hearts and minds. We all, people of every color, nation, ethnicity, and faith-carry them. I hope we will determinedly come together to find a path toward each other in love. Whether you believe in God or not, love is the force that binds us as a cohesive society. In the words, of M. Gandhi, "Love is the strongest force the world possesses and yet it is the humblest imaginable."


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on May 24, 2021 at 11:24 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 11:24 am
Glenn Beckham
Registered user
Walter Hays School
on May 24, 2021 at 11:24 am
Glenn Beckham, Walter Hays School
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 11:24 am

I concur as simply surrendering to the police could have even more damaging repercussions once a suspect of color is in custody.

Just don't point a gun or knife at them.

Most of these cops are trigger-happy and just ichin' to get off by discharging their service weapons.

And why be polite and respectful towards those who are blatantly disrespecting you?

It is a two-way street and cops have to earn their respect.


Leisha Corbett
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on May 24, 2021 at 11:41 am
Leisha Corbett, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 11:41 am
Consider Your Options.
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 24, 2021 at 11:57 am
Consider Your Options. , Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 11:57 am

Let's please choose words that bring us together, and do not drive us apart. There are good and bad officers. There is prejudice everywhere in people of every color and ethnicity all over the world, though our black neighbors have borne an awful share of its most brutal expression in this country. Prejudice and hate are human problems--fundamental to our being. We need to work in a disciplined way within ourselves and with each other to find a path toward love. Let's choose words that guide us toward seeing the good in our neighbors.


Bystander
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 24, 2021 at 12:08 pm
Bystander, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 12:08 pm

I suppose it is a case of how we teach our children. If we teach our children to respect the laws, respect other people, respect the police and to respect themselves, then it is a good starting place. If we teach our children to hate other people, to hate the police and to hate authority, then we are doing them a great disservice.


Nancy Ng
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 24, 2021 at 12:45 pm
Nancy Ng, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 12:45 pm

It was encouraging to be among the hundreds gathered at City Hall on Saturday but the comments here emphasize the reality of racism in our city. Mr. Floyd did not die because he lacked "common sense" or because his parents didn't teach him well. He was murdered by a racist cop in a racist country. We need more than prayer; we need justice.


Hmmm
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on May 24, 2021 at 2:51 pm
Hmmm, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 2:51 pm

New East Palo Alto council member Antonio Lopez needs to spend less time in front of the cameras and the media and more time learning how to be a better representative of the people.


A Progressive Palo Alto Resident
Registered user
Professorville
on May 24, 2021 at 3:38 pm
A Progressive Palo Alto Resident, Professorville
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 3:38 pm

*New East Palo Alto council member Antonio Lopez needs to spend less time in front of the cameras and the media and more time learning how to be a better representative of the people.

From what I've heard, his election day tacos were excellent and even warranted post-election litigation by a disgruntled political opponent.


Bystander
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 24, 2021 at 3:46 pm
Bystander, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 3:46 pm

My oh my.

It seems that teaching future police officers while they are children to be respectful of everyone including themselves and to not hate anyone, is now called being racist.

Everyone has to learn to be respectful of everyone else including themselves. It also includes being respectful of those who give their opinions on Town Square. Respecting our fellow human beings is a character trait we all need to have.


Hmmm
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on May 24, 2021 at 3:47 pm
Hmmm, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 3:47 pm
A Progressive Palo Alto Resident
Registered user
Professorville
on May 24, 2021 at 3:51 pm
A Progressive Palo Alto Resident, Professorville
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 3:51 pm

° Respecting our fellow human beings is a character trait we all need to have.

Respect is earned and not to be given away freely.

There is a big difference between being respectful and obsequious.

If the police do not respect people of color, why should people of color respect them?

[Portion removed due to deletion of referenced comment.]


Hmmm
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on May 24, 2021 at 4:13 pm
Hmmm, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 4:13 pm
Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on May 24, 2021 at 4:28 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 4:28 pm

The division is happening along the lines as to where you fall politically.


YP
Registered user
Crescent Park
on May 24, 2021 at 6:47 pm
YP, Crescent Park
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 6:47 pm
Hmmm
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on May 24, 2021 at 7:18 pm
Hmmm, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 7:18 pm

Sure sounds like local politicians are awfully sensitive!


Nancy Ng
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on May 24, 2021 at 8:07 pm
Nancy Ng, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 8:07 pm
What Will They Do Next
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on May 24, 2021 at 8:18 pm
What Will They Do Next, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 24, 2021 at 8:18 pm
Bystander
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 25, 2021 at 1:47 pm
Bystander, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 25, 2021 at 1:47 pm

I think it is very sad to live in a world where respect is expected to be earned rather than given to all. That people expect to only give respect to those who are deemed worthy of respect sounds like the wrong way round to me. I was taught to respect everyone, we didn't have to necessarily "like" them, but we were told to respect them anyway. Starting with teachers, family members, neighbors, classmates, and anyone else we came into contact with. Respect to others was good manners and a good way to live.

If we all start respecting each other without waiting until others have earned our respect, we might start building a few bridges.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on May 25, 2021 at 1:53 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on May 25, 2021 at 1:53 pm

Trust has to be earned, but respect should be given to all, especially authority. All opinions should be respected too -- including moderation, but sadly too many people don't understand this.

There are a few people here who actually "tell me how to post" but that's a reflection on them, and I let it slide off my back.


James Toone
Registered user
Barron Park
on May 25, 2021 at 5:14 pm
James Toone, Barron Park
Registered user
on May 25, 2021 at 5:14 pm

*Respect is earned and not to be given away freely.

^ Concurring.

* If we all start respecting each other without waiting until others have earned our respect, we might start building a few bridges.

*respect should be given to all, especially authority.

^ Disagreeing with you both.

Respect is earned...however everyone deserves common courtesy.

As for respecting authority...in the military we salute the rank and not necessarily the individual.

As aforementioned, respect is EARNED.


Eleanor K.
Registered user
Crescent Park
on May 26, 2021 at 7:47 am
Eleanor K., Crescent Park
Registered user
on May 26, 2021 at 7:47 am

Some individuals here apparently do not know the difference between respect and common courtesy.

Everyone deserves common courtesy. Not everyone deserves our respect.

Case in point...our last POTUS.


Bystander
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 26, 2021 at 11:45 am
Bystander, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 26, 2021 at 11:45 am

Dictionary definition of respect <<due regard for the feelings, wishes, rights, or traditions of others.>>

Why are we unable to give due regard to others as a common courtesy? It is good manners and the way we should be living as a society.

As Jennifer said, trust has to be earned, but respect to all should be something we learn from early childhood.


Eric Forrest
Registered user
Professorville
on May 26, 2021 at 2:50 pm
Eric Forrest, Professorville
Registered user
on May 26, 2021 at 2:50 pm

> Dictionary definition of respect <>

This is all fine and dandy but it does not apply to certain types of individuals (e.g. racists, sociopaths, sexual predators, convicted murderers and as another poster noted, a certain former president along with his band of right-wing insurrectionists, white supremacists, and QAnon conspiracy proponents.

Common courtesy and mutual respect is a two-way street.


Mildred Cannon
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on May 26, 2021 at 3:22 pm
Mildred Cannon, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 26, 2021 at 3:22 pm

A person needs to ask themselves who and what they are respecting first.

And if another person is disrespecting you, they are not worthy of your respect.

The chump train leaves the station for those astute enough to have a ticket.


Bystander
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 28, 2021 at 11:10 am
Bystander, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 28, 2021 at 11:10 am


The "Golden Rule" of Leviticus 19:18 was quoted by Jesus of Nazareth during his Sermon on the Mount and described by him as the second great commandment. The common English phrasing is "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you".

So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. Matthew 7. 12

We should be the example to others. We should be teaching this to our children and we should not lower ourselves to standards we believe are lower than this Golden Rule.


Harland Croft
Registered user
another community
on May 28, 2021 at 12:06 pm
Harland Croft, another community
Registered user
on May 28, 2021 at 12:06 pm

> The common English phrasing is "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you".

The Golden Rule is a noteworthy moral compass to live by but has its inherent flaws.

As a former clergy and university lecturer in theology, the question often arises...what if doing unto others is not what they actually wish or prefer?

For example, if another individual was a masochist, should you in turn become sadistic in order to fulfill their preferences?

Or if another person despises liver, would you serve it to that dinner guest because you yourself enjoy eating liver?

The Golden Rule does not apply to everything.


Massoud Akim
Registered user
Stanford
on May 28, 2021 at 12:53 pm
Massoud Akim, Stanford
Registered user
on May 28, 2021 at 12:53 pm

*The Golden Rule does not apply to everything.

The history of the United States and other global empires most certainly did not adhere to this premise.

The Golden Rule sounds good in principle but is a fallacy for the ages.


An Attorney At Large
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on May 28, 2021 at 3:27 pm
An Attorney At Large, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 28, 2021 at 3:27 pm

I too do not adhere to The Golden Rule as it has either backfired or proven to be a waste of time and energy on certain individuals.

As a practicing attorney I have witnessed and experienced this too many times and as Leo Durocher once said, "Nice guys finish last."

It's OK to be a nice guy but don't be a chump.

Your mental and emotional health (as well as financial security) is dependent upon this perspective.


No End In Sight
Registered user
Downtown North
on May 28, 2021 at 4:59 pm
No End In Sight, Downtown North
Registered user
on May 28, 2021 at 4:59 pm

>>"The "Golden Rule" of Leviticus 19:18 was quoted by Jesus of Nazareth during his Sermon on the Mount and described by him as the second great commandment."

And how far did that ideal get Jesus?

The last time I checked, Jesus died for the sins of man and that was over 2,000 years ago.

The history of man clearly indicates that mankind learned absolutely nothing from his ultimate sacrifice as every day has been the 'same old, same old' for centuries since.

Perhaps it's best to reserve The Golden Rule for only those one personally feels are truly deserving of such considerations.

And a lot of people aren't.


Pierce Layton
Registered user
another community
on May 29, 2021 at 7:32 am
Pierce Layton, another community
Registered user
on May 29, 2021 at 7:32 am

I enjoy a good bottle of French Burgundy and have served it to my dinner guests on occasion.

Some people appreciated the wine while others could not differentiate it from a jug of Carlo Rossi.

If the Golden Rule actually applied in both principle and practice, I should also be served Chambertin whenever I am invited out to someone's for dinner.

I think if we simply stick with The Golden Rule as a 'courtesy', we're OK but to make it all inclusive is absolutely ludicrous.

Except for those who can turn water into
wine.


Free Your Mind
Registered user
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on May 29, 2021 at 9:07 am
Free Your Mind, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
Registered user
on May 29, 2021 at 9:07 am

"I think if we simply stick with The Golden Rule as a 'courtesy', we're OK..."

Courtesy as a basic interactive gesture makes sense but we happen to live in a world where some people will always be rude and/or condescending.

This is human nature and there is no going around it.

So perhaps it is best to simply ignore those individuals who are not worthy of our respect, courtesy, and acknowledgment.


Bill Jacoby
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on May 31, 2021 at 7:09 am
Bill Jacoby, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on May 31, 2021 at 7:09 am

Though the Golden Rule sounds good in theory, it is not an applicable or practical working concept to humans as a whole.

The history of mankind will attest to that and on a far larger scale, even countries and their respective leaders do not adhere to this so-called rule of thumb.

Try conveying the Golden Rule to leaders behind the Israel-Hamas conflict, or to the PRC or to the white supremacists movement in America and see if they are willing to listen and/or change their perspectives.

Fat chance so let's put an end to believing in pipe dreams as the bottom line remains...humans are always seeking an edge over one another and this means there will never be any level playing fields nor an acceptance of mutually agreed upon rules.

The world is a jungle.


Erubial Tejada
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on May 31, 2021 at 8:50 am
Erubial Tejada, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 31, 2021 at 8:50 am

Gangs don't practice the Golden Rule either and neither do lawyers and politicians.


Bystander
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 31, 2021 at 11:39 am
Bystander, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on May 31, 2021 at 11:39 am

The Golden Rule does not mean that everyone should be encouraged to live the same way, eat the same food, or to do anything that many of these comments seem to think.

Instead it should be looked on as treating other people with the same respect you would like them to treat you. If they are hungry, they should be given food, but not the specific food the giver enjoys. If they are tired, they should be given rest. If they are weak, they should be helped. If they are in need, then they should be offered alms.

It also means that if they have done something wrong by societal standards, they should still be treated with respect as they are given the societal discipline their wrongdoings invoke. It doesn't mean that we should ignore their wrongdoings, but we should use compassion as that discipline is presented. It may be called tough love. It may be called justice. But it also can mean repentance and forgiveness.

It is called showing love and empathy, it is "Doasyouwouldbedoneby".


CruiserAtLarge
Registered user
another community
on May 31, 2021 at 11:55 am
CruiserAtLarge, another community
Registered user
on May 31, 2021 at 11:55 am

"It is called showing love and empathy,"

@ Bystander
Then how do you explain the Palo Alto residents who tend to be outwardly hostile towards the homeless and transient RVs parked along ECR?

And shouldn't we give freely to ALL panhandlers and/or to those seeking some 'small change'?

If the Golden Rule actually applied in PA,
then EVERYBODYY would be welcome regardless of their lot in life.

Hypocrites.


Madison Petrovsky
Registered user
another community
on May 31, 2021 at 4:49 pm
Madison Petrovsky, another community
Registered user
on May 31, 2021 at 4:49 pm

The Golden Rule simply does not work.

You will get screwed if you apply it to everyone.

Some a**holes do not deserve either courtesy or respect.

Time to get real and smell the buds.


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