News

Palo Alto Unified to offer Pfizer vaccine to eligible students

First clinic to be hosted at Palo Alto High School on Sunday, with more to come

Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in a vial. Courtesy BioNTech.

With one of three COVID-19 vaccines now available to children ages 12 and up in Santa Clara County, the Palo Alto Unified School District is opening up its first vaccine site for eligible students this Sunday at Palo Alto High School.

Through a partnership with Safeway Pharmacy, the district will host daylong clinics on campus to administer shots of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Parents will be able to schedule a time slot for their children online ahead of time, with up to 1,000 shots of the vaccine available during each clinic.

Superintendent Don Austin announced the partnership during a board meeting on Tuesday.

"This is a Safeway program and we are the host of the program," Austin said. "And we really appreciate that partnership."

The first clinic will be hosted on Sunday at Palo Alto High School's Peery Family Center gym, said Lana Conaway, assistant superintendent of equity and student affairs. Austin credited Conaway on Tuesday for spearheading the partnership program.

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"We solidified our partnership the day after there was an announcement that (kids) 12 and up can get vaccinated," Conaway said in an interview.

Palo Alto Unified previously worked with the supermarket company in February to provide vaccines for its faculty and faculty family members. According to Conaway, the program helped administer 975 vaccines in total, across three clinics, throughout March, April and May.

With a partnership already in place, Conaway said developing a vaccine program for the students was swift and simple.

Each clinic will be staffed by Safeway Pharmacy's nurses to administer the vaccine. School nurses will help with the pre- and post-vaccination process, which includes age verification and monitoring students for 15 minutes after the shot.

District board member Jennifer DiBrienza and members of PTA Council will also be volunteering on Sunday, Conaway said.

By Thursday, May 13, all 1,000 slots for Sunday's clinic had been taken.

Stephanie Compton, a classroom aide at Ohlone Elementary School and a PAUSD parent, signed her son Luke up on the day the program was announced to district families on Tuesday.

Luke, an eighth grader at JLS middle school, is the last person standing in Compton's immediate family to get vaccinated.

"He's excited," Compton said.

Clinics will be held every seven or eight days, Conaway said. The clinic to administer the second dose of the Pfizer's two-shot vaccine will be held three weeks from this Sunday.

Locations may change on the basis of community need. Conaway added that the district will also try to make accommodations for students who want to get vaccinated but can't make the commute.

"We want to make sure there are no barriers for families as well," she said. "So I encourage families to call us if they want the vaccination but they're having some difficulties getting to the location."

With the recent Food and Drug Administration's authorization of the Pfizer vaccine for children 12 to 15 years old, Santa Clara County made an announcement on May 12 opening up the vaccine to the same age group. Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are still in the process of testing their vaccines for younger children, according to several media reports.

For now, the district will administer Pfizer, but Conaway said that that may change based on the other vaccines' availability.

While the district is providing opportunities to get staff and students vaccinated, it will not require students to be vaccinated in order to come back to campus nor will it ask students about their vaccination status.

"We encourage families to do what's best for them," Conaway said, emphasizing that she respects families' desires to not get the vaccine. "My recommendation for all, even for those who are feeling a little leery about the vaccination, is to get vaccinated. That's how we're all going to feel a little more secure moving forward and getting back to normal."

Find comprehensive coverage on the Midpeninsula's response to the new coronavirus by Palo Alto Online, the Mountain View Voice and the Almanac here.

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Palo Alto Unified to offer Pfizer vaccine to eligible students

First clinic to be hosted at Palo Alto High School on Sunday, with more to come

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Thu, May 13, 2021, 10:52 pm

With one of three COVID-19 vaccines now available to children ages 12 and up in Santa Clara County, the Palo Alto Unified School District is opening up its first vaccine site for eligible students this Sunday at Palo Alto High School.

Through a partnership with Safeway Pharmacy, the district will host daylong clinics on campus to administer shots of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Parents will be able to schedule a time slot for their children online ahead of time, with up to 1,000 shots of the vaccine available during each clinic.

Superintendent Don Austin announced the partnership during a board meeting on Tuesday.

"This is a Safeway program and we are the host of the program," Austin said. "And we really appreciate that partnership."

The first clinic will be hosted on Sunday at Palo Alto High School's Peery Family Center gym, said Lana Conaway, assistant superintendent of equity and student affairs. Austin credited Conaway on Tuesday for spearheading the partnership program.

"We solidified our partnership the day after there was an announcement that (kids) 12 and up can get vaccinated," Conaway said in an interview.

Palo Alto Unified previously worked with the supermarket company in February to provide vaccines for its faculty and faculty family members. According to Conaway, the program helped administer 975 vaccines in total, across three clinics, throughout March, April and May.

With a partnership already in place, Conaway said developing a vaccine program for the students was swift and simple.

Each clinic will be staffed by Safeway Pharmacy's nurses to administer the vaccine. School nurses will help with the pre- and post-vaccination process, which includes age verification and monitoring students for 15 minutes after the shot.

District board member Jennifer DiBrienza and members of PTA Council will also be volunteering on Sunday, Conaway said.

By Thursday, May 13, all 1,000 slots for Sunday's clinic had been taken.

Stephanie Compton, a classroom aide at Ohlone Elementary School and a PAUSD parent, signed her son Luke up on the day the program was announced to district families on Tuesday.

Luke, an eighth grader at JLS middle school, is the last person standing in Compton's immediate family to get vaccinated.

"He's excited," Compton said.

Clinics will be held every seven or eight days, Conaway said. The clinic to administer the second dose of the Pfizer's two-shot vaccine will be held three weeks from this Sunday.

Locations may change on the basis of community need. Conaway added that the district will also try to make accommodations for students who want to get vaccinated but can't make the commute.

"We want to make sure there are no barriers for families as well," she said. "So I encourage families to call us if they want the vaccination but they're having some difficulties getting to the location."

With the recent Food and Drug Administration's authorization of the Pfizer vaccine for children 12 to 15 years old, Santa Clara County made an announcement on May 12 opening up the vaccine to the same age group. Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are still in the process of testing their vaccines for younger children, according to several media reports.

For now, the district will administer Pfizer, but Conaway said that that may change based on the other vaccines' availability.

While the district is providing opportunities to get staff and students vaccinated, it will not require students to be vaccinated in order to come back to campus nor will it ask students about their vaccination status.

"We encourage families to do what's best for them," Conaway said, emphasizing that she respects families' desires to not get the vaccine. "My recommendation for all, even for those who are feeling a little leery about the vaccination, is to get vaccinated. That's how we're all going to feel a little more secure moving forward and getting back to normal."

Find comprehensive coverage on the Midpeninsula's response to the new coronavirus by Palo Alto Online, the Mountain View Voice and the Almanac here.

Comments

What Will They Do Next
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on May 14, 2021 at 10:56 am
What Will They Do Next, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on May 14, 2021 at 10:56 am
LanaC
Registered user
another community
on May 14, 2021 at 12:30 pm
LanaC, another community
Registered user
on May 14, 2021 at 12:30 pm

Major thanks to the PAUSD Health Services Team for managing the complicated logistics of both COVID vaccinations and COVID testing. They make this possible with the support of an amazing group of PTAC/PTA volunteers.


JC
Registered user
Crescent Park
on May 14, 2021 at 5:19 pm
JC, Crescent Park
Registered user
on May 14, 2021 at 5:19 pm

Back in the dark ages - We were given the Salk Polio Vaccine at the Palo Alto schools during school hours. Instead of a PE class at JORDAN Jr High we went to the cafeteria for our shot then back to the playing fields. Of course those were the days of common sense. We even had modest physicals and eye exams at the local grammar schools once a year.


Alvin
Registered user
Professorville
on May 15, 2021 at 12:30 pm
Alvin, Professorville
Registered user
on May 15, 2021 at 12:30 pm

Please correct the following misleading statement in the article: "With the recent Food and Drug Administration's APPROVAL of the Pfizer vaccine for children 12 to 15 years old..." (My emphasis.)

The "vaccine" has not been "approved" by the FDA but rather has been "authorized" under the FDA's Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) authority. The vaccines are currently undergoing longer-term clinical trials. Web Link

It should also be pointed out that as of January 2021, by the CDC's own data, less than 200 children between the ages of 0-17 died of Covid. Web Link

To put that number in perspective, the CDC provisional figures for all causes of death for children under 18 years of age is between 35,000-40,000, and that's based on the fact that about 28,000 children between 0-14 died in the US from all causes in 2020, and 35,470 died between the ages of 15-24. I added a quarter of those 35,470 deaths to the 28,000 death figure for ages 0-14 to reach the 35-40k death figure. In other words, of the roughly 35,000-40,000 total deaths of children under age 17 from all causes, roughly 250 (by now) or 0.5% of all child deaths are from Covid...and that's including Covid deaths of children who had other underlying conditions. TABLE. Provisional* number and rate of total deaths and COVID-19–related deaths, by demographic characteristics — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2020

My point is, why are children who are at virtually no risk of dying from Covid being vaccinated against it...when the long-term consequences of the testing are unknown? [Portion removed.] If the argument is that children could spread to adults, adults can protect themselves via vaccination assuming they don't have natural immunity by now.


Lloyd
Registered user
another community
on May 15, 2021 at 3:11 pm
Lloyd, another community
Registered user
on May 15, 2021 at 3:11 pm

Alvin,

Thank you for reading and for pointing out the error. Article has been corrected.

LL


The Voice of Palo Alto
Registered user
Crescent Park
on May 16, 2021 at 10:34 pm
The Voice of Palo Alto, Crescent Park
Registered user
on May 16, 2021 at 10:34 pm

This is a real vaccine and does not need to be posted in quotation marks and children will also need to be vaccinated.

The CDC itself has estimated that nearly 26.7 million children under 18 have been infected with COVID-19. A recent study found that roughly 10–15 percent of all infected children develop “long COVID,” meaning that up to 4 million children may already be suffering from long-term complications. The majority likely were infected in reopened schools.

The lie that children do not readily transmit the coronavirus—disproved by multiple studies at the very beginning of the pandemic—was promoted by the Trump administration and has continued under Biden. Upon his election, Biden pledged to resume in-person learning at all schools where children were still learning safely from home, with his top economic advisor Brian Deese bluntly stating that this was “so that parents … can get back to work.”

Corinne McDaniels-Davidson, the director of the San Diego State University Institute for Public Health, told the Times, “The ideas that they cannot transmit Covid or are immune from disease are pervasive among the lay public. We need education here.”

Finally to your thoughts about adults being vaccinated so everything is ok: “Though children are less likely than adults to develop severe cases of Covid-19, the scientists said their immunity was important because they could be hosts for the virus and a way for it to continue to circulate or develop new variants.”

Finally, the vaccine will soon be “APPROVED” as opposed to just “AUTHORIZED.” This is just semantics.

Once the vaccine also gets authorized for ages
2-11, I believe it should be made mandatory for children to be vaccinated for Covid to attend school. This will help stop all of these weird people who think the government is trying to microchip them nonsense.
I hope that clarifies it.
Web Link


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