Arts

Can California wildflowers survive climate change?

Photography exhibit captures endangered blooms throughout the state

"Beauty and the Beast" features photographs of wildflowers all over California, from the low desert to high alpine areas such as this field of wildflowers at Carson Pass, El Dorado National Forest. Courtesy Rob Badger and Nita Winter.

Just two years ago this spring, vibrant "super blooms" were drawing crowds to some of California's more remote corners to see hillsides covered in bright orange poppies and other wildflowers. Though there are still wildflowers to be found this year, a mostly dry winter has brought fewer blooms and signals that a drought may be looming. And in fact, an​ exhibition at the Los Altos History Museum is expl​oring​ how wildflowers are not only harbingers of spring, but also heralds of climate change.

"Beauty and the Beast: California Wildflowers and Climate Change" features the work of photographers Rob Badger and Nita Winter, who have captured images of our state's vanishing wildflowers for nearly 30 years.

The exhibit delves into the effects of climate change on wildflowers, with photos of the various blooms that thrive in the state's many diverse geographic regions, from Death Valley to the high Sierras. The show is a traveling exhibit that originated at the San Francisco Public Library, and is presented by Exhibit Envoy.

"Beauty and the Beast" can be seen in person through July 11 at the Los Altos History Museum, 51 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. For more information, visit losaltoshistory.org.

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Can California wildflowers survive climate change?

Photography exhibit captures endangered blooms throughout the state

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Thu, Apr 22, 2021, 9:29 am

Just two years ago this spring, vibrant "super blooms" were drawing crowds to some of California's more remote corners to see hillsides covered in bright orange poppies and other wildflowers. Though there are still wildflowers to be found this year, a mostly dry winter has brought fewer blooms and signals that a drought may be looming. And in fact, an​ exhibition at the Los Altos History Museum is expl​oring​ how wildflowers are not only harbingers of spring, but also heralds of climate change.

"Beauty and the Beast: California Wildflowers and Climate Change" features the work of photographers Rob Badger and Nita Winter, who have captured images of our state's vanishing wildflowers for nearly 30 years.

The exhibit delves into the effects of climate change on wildflowers, with photos of the various blooms that thrive in the state's many diverse geographic regions, from Death Valley to the high Sierras. The show is a traveling exhibit that originated at the San Francisco Public Library, and is presented by Exhibit Envoy.

"Beauty and the Beast" can be seen in person through July 11 at the Los Altos History Museum, 51 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. For more information, visit losaltoshistory.org.

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