News

Three rapes reported on Stanford University campus

University police are investigating the alleged cases involving acquaintances of the victims; one case has been referred to the District Attorney's Office

Three rapes were reported in March 2021 on the Stanford University campus. Embarcadero Media file photo by Sinead Chang.

The Stanford University Department of Public Safety is investigating reports of three rapes on the campus over a three-week period in March, the department has confirmed in an email.

The incidents, on March 9, 25 and 27, were not related to one another and involved acquaintances of the three women who reported the attacks.

The March 9 incident occurred at Building A, Escondido Village Graduate Residence, between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. The victim, who reported the incident on March 10, is a 19-year-old Stanford female student who was allegedly raped by a 20-year-old male non-student. Police have completed their investigation and have submitted the case to the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office for review.

The second incident occurred at Crothers Memorial Hall, 621 Escondido Mall, between March 25 at 11:30 p.m. and March 26 at midnight. A 21-year-old female Stanford student reported the incident on March 29. The man under investigation is a 20-year-old male Stanford student.

A third incident took place at an unknown location on March 27 at 11:15 a.m. The female Stanford student, age 24, reported the incident on March 28. The man is a non-student who is 26 years old. This case is also under investigation, police said.

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The Department of Public Safety has not issued a campus alert, known as a Timely Warning or AlertSU. Stanford police don't automatically issue AlertSU warnings for sex offenses involving persons who are acquaintances, as were the students in each of these instances. The alerts are made on a case-by-case basis, the department said.

In 2019, a Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Misconduct of undergraduate and graduate students found that 40% of Stanford undergraduate women who have been at the university for four years experienced some form of nonconsensual sexual contact.

At the time, Provost Persis Drell called the report a "a chronic public health issue."

In November 2020, Stanford released its annual Title IX report on campus sexual violence and harassment, which found the campus was headed toward its previous levels of sexual assault and harassment reports prior to the campus' closure in March 2020 due to the pandemic.

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Three rapes reported on Stanford University campus

University police are investigating the alleged cases involving acquaintances of the victims; one case has been referred to the District Attorney's Office

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Sat, Apr 10, 2021, 9:01 am

The Stanford University Department of Public Safety is investigating reports of three rapes on the campus over a three-week period in March, the department has confirmed in an email.

The incidents, on March 9, 25 and 27, were not related to one another and involved acquaintances of the three women who reported the attacks.

The March 9 incident occurred at Building A, Escondido Village Graduate Residence, between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. The victim, who reported the incident on March 10, is a 19-year-old Stanford female student who was allegedly raped by a 20-year-old male non-student. Police have completed their investigation and have submitted the case to the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office for review.

The second incident occurred at Crothers Memorial Hall, 621 Escondido Mall, between March 25 at 11:30 p.m. and March 26 at midnight. A 21-year-old female Stanford student reported the incident on March 29. The man under investigation is a 20-year-old male Stanford student.

A third incident took place at an unknown location on March 27 at 11:15 a.m. The female Stanford student, age 24, reported the incident on March 28. The man is a non-student who is 26 years old. This case is also under investigation, police said.

The Department of Public Safety has not issued a campus alert, known as a Timely Warning or AlertSU. Stanford police don't automatically issue AlertSU warnings for sex offenses involving persons who are acquaintances, as were the students in each of these instances. The alerts are made on a case-by-case basis, the department said.

In 2019, a Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Misconduct of undergraduate and graduate students found that 40% of Stanford undergraduate women who have been at the university for four years experienced some form of nonconsensual sexual contact.

At the time, Provost Persis Drell called the report a "a chronic public health issue."

In November 2020, Stanford released its annual Title IX report on campus sexual violence and harassment, which found the campus was headed toward its previous levels of sexual assault and harassment reports prior to the campus' closure in March 2020 due to the pandemic.

Comments

Lester Devins
Registered user
Barron Park
on Apr 10, 2021 at 9:27 am
Lester Devins, Barron Park
Registered user
on Apr 10, 2021 at 9:27 am

How does one confirm a non-student assailant VS a student assailant?

Is acquaintantship the reference point?

Reason for asking, even in high school not everybody knows everybody and a university campus is considerably larger in terms of overall student population.

And why no assailant descriptions based on color?

Is this no longer PC?


John B. Sails
Registered user
Greene Middle School
on Apr 10, 2021 at 9:31 am
John B. Sails, Greene Middle School
Registered user
on Apr 10, 2021 at 9:31 am

[Post removed due to same poster using multiple names]


Jason Whitman
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Apr 10, 2021 at 10:28 am
Jason Whitman, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Apr 10, 2021 at 10:28 am

[Post removed due to same poster using multiple names]


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Apr 10, 2021 at 11:59 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Apr 10, 2021 at 11:59 am

Sadly, this happens on all college campuses, but 40% is extremely high. Is it happening more often, being reported more often or has Stanford broadened their definition? Very troubling.


Michele Dauber
Registered user
Barron Park
on Apr 11, 2021 at 8:35 am
Michele Dauber, Barron Park
Registered user
on Apr 11, 2021 at 8:35 am

It is unacceptable that Stanford fails to issue timely warnings pursuant to the Clery Act when the students know each other. That sends the outdated message that being raped by an acquaintance is less serious than being raped by a stranger, and that men who rape acquaintances are less dangerous or less likely to be serial rapists. It also reinforces victim blaming myths of rape culture which assumes that this was a misunderstanding on a date instead of a vicious crime. Stanford's failure to issues these warnings deprives students of knowing of the dangers in their surroundings.


Zhao Zhiang
Registered user
Stanford
on Apr 11, 2021 at 9:29 am
Zhao Zhiang, Stanford
Registered user
on Apr 11, 2021 at 9:29 am

[Post removed due to same poster using multiple names]


Bob
Registered user
College Terrace
on Apr 11, 2021 at 10:45 am
Bob, College Terrace
Registered user
on Apr 11, 2021 at 10:45 am
Lynne Henderson
Registered user
another community
on Apr 12, 2021 at 1:09 pm
Lynne Henderson, another community
Registered user
on Apr 12, 2021 at 1:09 pm

I agree with Prof. Dauber. I am sick and tired of the perpetuation of the myth that rape is only committed by strangers--alas, the term "acquaintance rape", created by anit-rape advocates in the late 80's/early 90's to capture the vast majority of sexual assaults now has become yet another term for "consent dense")
If I had a passing acquaintance with the creep who subsequently broke into my home, beat me up, and raped me in 1981, guess no one would have cared or prosecuted him. Guess the same thing goes on today. . . my heart goes out to the victim/survivors.


Barry Stein J.D.
Registered user
another community
on Apr 12, 2021 at 1:51 pm
Barry Stein J.D., another community
Registered user
on Apr 12, 2021 at 1:51 pm

Plaintiffs and victims should sue Stanford University in civil court (for damages and negligence).


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