News

Video shows Palo Alto police dog attack Mountain View resident

Man seeks $20M in damages after June 2020 incident

Body-worn camera footage released on March 16 shows Joel Alejo, a resident of Mountain View, get bitten by a Palo Alto police dog on June 25, 2020. Courtesy city of Palo Alto.

The Palo Alto Police Department released a video Tuesday showing a June 2020 mauling of a Mountain View resident by one of the agency's dogs, an incident that has led to a $20 million claim against the city.

The resident, Joel Alejo, is seeking damages from the Police Department, according to a claim that his attorneys filed. The Palo Alto City Council discussed the complaint in a closed session Monday night. Mayor Tom DuBois said there was no reportable action after that discussion.

The video, taken largely from the body cameras of officers Ian Johnson and Nick Enberg, shows law enforcement authorities approaching a backyard storage shed in Mountain View at about 2:30 a.m. on June 25. According to the Police Department, officers entered the yard while assisting Mountain View police in searching for a person accused of domestic violence and kidnapping. They believed he had fled into the residential neighborhood.

The camera shows the police approaching the shed, with Enberg and the police dog leading the way. The dog immediately clamps his teeth on Alejo, who had been sleeping and can be heard crying as the dog mauls his leg. Alejo can be seen covering his head with his hands while Enberg and others yell commands at the dog as he and other officers attempt to restrain the K-9.

After pulling the dog off, a process that takes about a minute, officers are seen trying to take Alejo into custody.

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"Stop resisting!" one officer yells at him.

"Who is this?" another asks.

Officers then command Alejo to roll over and handcuff him on the far side of the shed, while the dog whimpers in the background on the side closest to the entrance.

In a news statement accompanying the video, the Police Department stated that officers had obtained permission from someone inside the home to search the yard. They believed the man in the shed was hiding the wanted person, according to the announcement.

"Further investigation revealed the person was not suspected and in fact was not connected to the criminal incident that prompted the search," the department said in an announcement.

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Alejo, 37, filed a complaint last December, stating that he has suffered "extreme pain, bleeding, bruising and other damages." The complaint also seeks damages for "wrongful detention, false imprisonment, emotional distress, fear, terror, anxiety, humiliation, loss of sense of security, dignity and pride."

His complaint seeks $500,000 for medical damages, $500,000 for loss of earnings, $4 million for future general damages and $15 million in "exemplary damages."

"Claimant at all times was lawfully in the backyard of his residence and sleeping at the time of the incident," the complaint states. "Claimant was not involved in criminal activity at the time of the attack."

The complaint notes that the police did not have a warrant for his arrest and that the attack did not occur in defense of a peace officer or any other person.

"Nonetheless, the Police K-9 dog was instructed to and commanded to viciously attack and maul the claimant, causing severe and permanent injuries."

According to the Mountain View Police Department, which also released camera footage on Tuesday, officers were looking for a man who had allegedly kidnapped his ex-girlfriend and then drove away with her in a stolen car before pushing her out of the car, taking her phone and running away.

After they found the ex-girlfriend, a 29-year-old Mountain View resident, they located a bag that could be used to track the alleged kidnapper with the assistance of a K-9unit. It requested assistance from Palo Alto because neither of its K-9 units was available to respond, according to the department's news release.

Officers from both agencies then asked a neighbor in the area if they could search the backyard for the wanted person. After reportedly getting consent from a resident, the officers proceeded to search the backyard, where they found Alejo in the shed.

Soon after the police dog bit Alejo, officers confirmed that he was not the person they were looking for. Alejo was reportedly treated for the bite wound and taken to a hospital.

Mountain View police said they had later followed up with the resident, who told them that they didn't know that a family member — Alejo — was in the backyard.

On July 17, officers located the alleged kidnapper on the first block of West El Camino Real and arrested him on suspicion of kidnapping, robbery, knowingly possessing stolen property and possession of a stolen vehicle.

The Palo Alto Police Department had investigated the incident, though its statement did not indicate whether any of the officers involved in the incident faced any disciplinary actions. The city's independent police auditor will review the incident and consider the adequacy of the city's response, according to the city's announcement.

The city declined to state whether any of the officers faced any disciplinary action, saying it "cannot comment on employee matters of this nature" and referred inquiries about the city's review to a future IPA report.

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Video shows Palo Alto police dog attack Mountain View resident

Man seeks $20M in damages after June 2020 incident

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Tue, Mar 16, 2021, 5:34 pm

The Palo Alto Police Department released a video Tuesday showing a June 2020 mauling of a Mountain View resident by one of the agency's dogs, an incident that has led to a $20 million claim against the city.

The resident, Joel Alejo, is seeking damages from the Police Department, according to a claim that his attorneys filed. The Palo Alto City Council discussed the complaint in a closed session Monday night. Mayor Tom DuBois said there was no reportable action after that discussion.

The video, taken largely from the body cameras of officers Ian Johnson and Nick Enberg, shows law enforcement authorities approaching a backyard storage shed in Mountain View at about 2:30 a.m. on June 25. According to the Police Department, officers entered the yard while assisting Mountain View police in searching for a person accused of domestic violence and kidnapping. They believed he had fled into the residential neighborhood.

The camera shows the police approaching the shed, with Enberg and the police dog leading the way. The dog immediately clamps his teeth on Alejo, who had been sleeping and can be heard crying as the dog mauls his leg. Alejo can be seen covering his head with his hands while Enberg and others yell commands at the dog as he and other officers attempt to restrain the K-9.

After pulling the dog off, a process that takes about a minute, officers are seen trying to take Alejo into custody.

"Stop resisting!" one officer yells at him.

"Who is this?" another asks.

Officers then command Alejo to roll over and handcuff him on the far side of the shed, while the dog whimpers in the background on the side closest to the entrance.

In a news statement accompanying the video, the Police Department stated that officers had obtained permission from someone inside the home to search the yard. They believed the man in the shed was hiding the wanted person, according to the announcement.

"Further investigation revealed the person was not suspected and in fact was not connected to the criminal incident that prompted the search," the department said in an announcement.

Alejo, 37, filed a complaint last December, stating that he has suffered "extreme pain, bleeding, bruising and other damages." The complaint also seeks damages for "wrongful detention, false imprisonment, emotional distress, fear, terror, anxiety, humiliation, loss of sense of security, dignity and pride."

His complaint seeks $500,000 for medical damages, $500,000 for loss of earnings, $4 million for future general damages and $15 million in "exemplary damages."

"Claimant at all times was lawfully in the backyard of his residence and sleeping at the time of the incident," the complaint states. "Claimant was not involved in criminal activity at the time of the attack."

The complaint notes that the police did not have a warrant for his arrest and that the attack did not occur in defense of a peace officer or any other person.

"Nonetheless, the Police K-9 dog was instructed to and commanded to viciously attack and maul the claimant, causing severe and permanent injuries."

According to the Mountain View Police Department, which also released camera footage on Tuesday, officers were looking for a man who had allegedly kidnapped his ex-girlfriend and then drove away with her in a stolen car before pushing her out of the car, taking her phone and running away.

After they found the ex-girlfriend, a 29-year-old Mountain View resident, they located a bag that could be used to track the alleged kidnapper with the assistance of a K-9unit. It requested assistance from Palo Alto because neither of its K-9 units was available to respond, according to the department's news release.

Officers from both agencies then asked a neighbor in the area if they could search the backyard for the wanted person. After reportedly getting consent from a resident, the officers proceeded to search the backyard, where they found Alejo in the shed.

Soon after the police dog bit Alejo, officers confirmed that he was not the person they were looking for. Alejo was reportedly treated for the bite wound and taken to a hospital.

Mountain View police said they had later followed up with the resident, who told them that they didn't know that a family member — Alejo — was in the backyard.

On July 17, officers located the alleged kidnapper on the first block of West El Camino Real and arrested him on suspicion of kidnapping, robbery, knowingly possessing stolen property and possession of a stolen vehicle.

The Palo Alto Police Department had investigated the incident, though its statement did not indicate whether any of the officers involved in the incident faced any disciplinary actions. The city's independent police auditor will review the incident and consider the adequacy of the city's response, according to the city's announcement.

The city declined to state whether any of the officers faced any disciplinary action, saying it "cannot comment on employee matters of this nature" and referred inquiries about the city's review to a future IPA report.

Comments

R. Cavendish
Registered user
Woodside
on Mar 16, 2021 at 7:10 pm
R. Cavendish, Woodside
Registered user
on Mar 16, 2021 at 7:10 pm

Reckless and irresponsible police intervention.

Officers should be held fully accountable and that K-9 stripped of his collar badge.

Another example of the PD going overboard and this one will cost the city plenty.


Not Good Enough
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 16, 2021 at 8:52 pm
Not Good Enough, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Mar 16, 2021 at 8:52 pm

I appreciate that these videos have been released. This awful incident happened nearly 9 months ago, the public only found out about it 3 months ago, so it's good to not wait any longer to see the 8 MVPD and 1 PAPD videos. Whoever in Palo Alto made this happen - thankyou. I also am relieved to know that the Independent Police Auditor will be reviewing this matter to ensure any investigation as to what happened here is done right and reported to the public.

It not only was horrible for the blameless Mr. Aljeo, but concerning for us all. It looks as though the dog was slow to follow commands to stop biting or letting go of Aljeo? How easy it must be for similar situations to happen - innocent people being mistakingly set upon by dogs. This is not Palo Alto's first such incident.

As to Mr. Alejo, I imagine being him, asleep then suddenly waking to being mauled by a German Shephard with police standing over me yelling. While I may or may not recover from the physical wounds, I doubt I would ever fully recover from the mental trauma. Is it not time to retire canines from the PAPD and let them be doggies in a safe environment instead of weapons?


Finally
Registered user
Midtown
on Mar 16, 2021 at 11:30 pm
Finally, Midtown
Registered user
on Mar 16, 2021 at 11:30 pm

The dog was doing it's job (good doggie!) but the police should have been more careful. This was an unfortunate situation for all involved.


Duveneck neighbor
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:12 am
Duveneck neighbor, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:12 am

'Stop resisting'?! As if a sleeping person groks immediately, through the fog of severely disturbed sleep, that the animal tearing at one's leg is a) a police dog, and that b) one is the subject of a police action.

Why not hold the dog at bay? Why not wake the person? There's no threat of flight in the confined spaces, shed and enclosed yard.

I really don't understand this use of surprise, in policing. Breonna Taylor was similarly 'surprised'; the technique is the same, albeit the scale here is much less.

What theory of law enforcement has led to these kinds of tactics and techniques? That is one of the deep questions we ought to be asking. Such tactics and techniques *need* to be changed; but, IMO we have to understand how we have come to this crossroads, before choosing where next to proceed.

But the status quo is unacceptable.


melba dickerson
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:16 am
melba dickerson, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:16 am

Once the 'suspect' was located, the police should have called off the K-9 and taken over. Instead, they let the dog continue attacking the 'victim' until finally calling the police (aka attack) dog off.

A poor decision by the responding police officers and a justifiable lawsuit against the city.

> "What theory of law enforcement has led to these kinds of tactics and techniques?"

^ Pervasive sadism and racism on the part of law enforcement.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:28 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:28 am

$20 million in damages is way over the top. $15 million in "exemplary damages?" What the heck are exemplary damages? Settlements should be reasonable.

"He was treated for a bite wound and taken to the hospital." If anyone really thinks this is worth $20 million, they're not thinking clearly.


Person
Registered user
Southgate
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:37 am
Person, Southgate
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:37 am

These officers had zero control over their dog and they need to be trained.


Sal Morales, Esq.
Registered user
another community
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:49 am
Sal Morales, Esq., another community
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 9:49 am

°"20 million in damages is way over the top."

The attorneys will get 1/3 of the eventual settlement as part of their legal fee structure.

1/3 of $20M is around $6M with roughly $14M going to the plaintiff.

Chances are the $20M figure will be negotiated to avoid a trial.

A $12M pre-trial settlement sounds about right as everyone will come out ahead (except for the City of Palo Alto).

The PAPD messed-up badly and with the victim being 'a person of color', a civil court trial is best avoided given today's social climate and ongoing accusations of police racism and brutalities.

The K-9 will come out of this incident unscathed because his handling is the responsibility of the officer in charge of him.

Most likely the dog will be assigned to paid administrative duties pending the settlement or hearing.


Stepheny
Registered user
Midtown
on Mar 17, 2021 at 10:19 am
Stepheny , Midtown
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 10:19 am

So, the resident didn't know that someone, a supposed relative/friend, was sleeping in their backyard? The resident of the house allowed the police to do their job and search the premises. They should be held accountable as should Alejo. When confronted by police, do as they ask and straighten the situation out.

Such situations are likely to become even more prevalent as Palo Alto and other communities allow and even support squatters all over the place.

I am not sympathetic with the $20m man who seems to have found a way to pay for a very fine roof over his head in this ill begotten lawsuit.


jayches
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 17, 2021 at 10:27 am
jayches, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 10:27 am

Officer is repeatedly yelling "dirsh dirsh" over and over, seemingly at the dog. Is that a police dog command the dog is ignoring? It's certainly a bad scene. Not making a judgment on either side, just trying to figure out what is going on with the length of the biting attack.


Marlon Jeffries
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on Mar 17, 2021 at 10:36 am
Marlon Jeffries, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 10:36 am

And meanwhile some Palo Alto residents are wondering where their tax dollars are being spent and why the city council is bemoaning other lost sources of revenue.

A reduction in the police budget, improved recruitment and vetting policy, better K-9 dog training and racial sensitivity training would be good places to start...unless more police-related lawsuits are OK with the residents of Palo Alto.


tmp
Registered user
Downtown North
on Mar 17, 2021 at 11:57 am
tmp, Downtown North
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 11:57 am

Commentators who know nothing of how these dogs are trained or controlled should stop commenting on what is happening or what is appropriate.

Further police are trying to do a difficult job in the middle of the night under trying circumstances, looking for a kidnapper. They had permission to enter the yard and no mention was made of an inhabitant.

While what happened was unfortunate and undoubtedly traumatic at the time, the man is fine and appears to be looking for a payout from deep pockets. An all too common occurrence these days. Will common sense come into play? Likely not.


Pieter Danes
Registered user
another community
on Mar 17, 2021 at 12:48 pm
Pieter Danes, another community
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 12:48 pm

>> Officer is repeatedly yelling "dirsh dirsh" over and over, seemingly at the dog. Is that a police dog command the dog is ignoring?

>> Commentators who know nothing of how these dogs are trained or controlled should stop commenting on what is happening or what is appropriate.


Most trained German Shepard behavioral commands are in Dutch or German.

My relatives raise and train German Shepards.

The one you are referencing must be a specialized police command.

My elderly neighbor who is a Holocaust survivor once told me that the SS had specialized commands for their German Shepards, Dobermans, and Rottweilers.

And perhaps the PAPD K-9 Corps have their own specialized commands as well.


Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
Registered user
Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 17, 2021 at 1:26 pm
Resident 1-Adobe Meadows, Adobe-Meadow
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 1:26 pm

the dog is operating at the command of his handler. The dog does not know if the person is carrying a gun or just sleeping. The dog is just doing what his handler told him to do. It is the handler that is the problem - not the dog.


Danny Walters
Registered user
College Terrace
on Mar 17, 2021 at 1:38 pm
Danny Walters, College Terrace
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 1:38 pm

° My elderly neighbor who is a Holocaust survivor once told me that the SS had specialized commands for their German Shepards, Dobermans, and Rottweilers.

° The dog is just doing what his handler told him to do. It is the handler that is the problem - not the dog.

So there's the apparent answer and explanation to this unfortunate incident.

Hopefully the victim sues the socks of the city and the PD is held accountable for this human rights violation.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Mar 17, 2021 at 2:11 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 2:11 pm

I agree with Stepheny. The resident allowed the police to search the backyard, knowing someone was sleeping in the shed. This should've been told to police. And if Alejo didn't cooperate with police and "do as they're asked" he should be held accountable as well.

The police are just doing their job. They had permission from the resident to search and without knowledge of someone sleeping out back, how many people have someone sleeping in their shed? Of course they thought someone was hiding out.


Roberto Villareal
Registered user
another community
on Mar 17, 2021 at 3:58 pm
Roberto Villareal, another community
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 3:58 pm

√ What the heck are exemplary damages?

@ Jennifer

In addition to the brutal PD dog attack there is...

(1) FALSE arrest, (2) FALSE imprisonment, (3) UNECESSARY exposure to Covid-19 while incarcerated, (4) substandard medical care while WRONGFULLY incarcerated, (5) being forced to eat substandard food while WRONGFULLY incarcerated, (6) being subjected to UNECESSARY harassment and verbal abuses from jail guards, (7) loss of personal FREEDOM while WRONFULLY incarcerated, (8) trauma from being WRONGFULLY incarcerated.

I would love to be Mr. Alejo's attorney. This is a major screw-up on the part of law enforcement and it will cost the city plenty.

And when the homeowner testifies that permission was granted to search the backyard but the homeowner
did not have the FULL knowledge or awareness of a houseguest (or rather shed guest) crashing that night in the backyard...GAME OVER.

Gray zones generally determine the outcome of most cases and the witness will be coached.

A smart attorney will also use racism on the part of the PD to strengthen the case, citing that Mr. Alejo's injuries were the direct result of not calling off the police dog prior to this vicious attack.

The police officers could also be facing criminal charges if the DA chooses to pursue the case upon review + the officers can also be sued separately by Mr. Alejo in civil court following any settlement with the city.

Mr. Alejo and his attorneys are in the driver's seat because ALL of this could have been avoided by the PD.


hector
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on Mar 17, 2021 at 4:51 pm
hector, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 4:51 pm

the police acted in haste with unrestrained dog.

subsequent injuries and scars + false arrest and wrongful jail time = many millions for victim and lawyer.

police lesson learned = zero...as this stuff happens all the time to poorer people of color.

victim is now a rich man but will carry emotional scars forever.

best to move away and buy a nice house.

palo alto is paying for it.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Mar 17, 2021 at 6:09 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 6:09 pm

Roberto -- People are falsely arrested in America (and exposed to the same things you listed). They don't ask for $15 million dollars (a total of $20 million) when it happens. It's absurd. This man was treated for a dog wound. That happens all the time in America too.

He's entitled to medical expenses and perhaps a little pain and suffering. And this has nothing to do with race. Just because someone is a minority doesn't mean that's the reason the action was taken.


esther steinman
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Mar 17, 2021 at 6:15 pm
esther steinman, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 6:15 pm

I disagree Jennifer. This incident is just another example of racist police actions towards people of color.

If it were a WHITE person pursuing a criminal and civil lawsuit against the PD for reckless indiscretion, wrongful use of force, and unjustified arrest/incarceration I imagine the victim would have your full support.


R. Cavendish
Registered user
another community
on Mar 17, 2021 at 6:32 pm
R. Cavendish, another community
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 6:32 pm

quote:

"If it were a WHITE person pursuing a criminal and civil lawsuit against the PD for reckless indiscretion, wrongful use of force, and unjustified arrest/incarceration I imagine the victim would have your full support."

If so, it just goes to show that there are still two sets of rules in America...an unlevel playing field based on skin-color and mindsets.


Shaquon Davis
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on Mar 17, 2021 at 7:07 pm
Shaquon Davis, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 7:07 pm

√ ...there are still two sets of rules in America...an unlevel playing field based on skin-color and mindsets.

This racist power base is changing with growing awareness and the destruction of past delusions.

It turns out that Lincoln was a white racist who cared little about black slaves and the House of Windsor (formerly the German House of Saxe-Coberg-Gotha) are all white supremacists who disdain and dislike the idea of mixed-race royalty.

In time, certain racist perspectives will eventually change but only after all of the racist symbolism is destroyed and uneducated, poor white people educated to at least a minimal extent.


jlanders
Registered user
Barron Park
on Mar 17, 2021 at 8:16 pm
jlanders, Barron Park
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 8:16 pm

> Officer is repeatedly yelling "dirsh dirsh" over and over, seemingly at the dog. Is that a police dog command the dog is ignoring?

The command is "drz" (pronounced "dursh"). It's Czech for "bite". The dog doesn't look like it's ignoring the command. The officer was likely surprised to come face to face with someone so quickly during the search and set the dog on Alejo.

The other command is "pust" (pronounced "pusht"). It's Czech for "let go." Once police had Alejo's arms under control and found no weapon in his hand, they called off the dog.

The police didn't say they arrested or took Alejo to jail and served him bad food. He was "detained" (i.e. not free to go) and then handcuffed while police searched the area for weapons. That's where Alejo's claims of unlawful detention and false imprisonment originate.

If you've never been bitten by a large dog, take my word - it's incredibly painful. Pretty horrible scene to watch. I'm surprised the Weekly didn't warn people about the graphic nature of the video.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Mar 17, 2021 at 8:22 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 8:22 pm

This person wouldn't have my support regardless of race. This isn't about race. This happens to people of ALL races. Did the police even know he was a minority when he was sound asleep in the dark? Did they know his name? Of course racism is real, but inserting race where it doesn't belong is a narrow minded mindset, and in some cases -- the mindset of a racist.

Asking for $20 million is GREED. Period.


Prescott Lane
Registered user
Greenmeadow
on Mar 17, 2021 at 8:52 pm
Prescott Lane, Greenmeadow
Registered user
on Mar 17, 2021 at 8:52 pm

The mere fact that the PD apprehended and dog-mauled the WRONG suspect while the actual one remained at large and was caught three weeks later makes the cops look even more inept and reactionary.

We do not need these types of individuals carrying a badge and packing heat, let alone in charge of a vicious dog.

This is America, not Russia or WW2 Germany.


Terry James
Registered user
another community
on Mar 18, 2021 at 6:56 am
Terry James, another community
Registered user
on Mar 18, 2021 at 6:56 am

>Asking for $20 million is GREED. Period.

And cops instructing a police dog to attack an innocent person while asleep is POLICE BRUTALITY. Period.


Tracy Levine
Registered user
Downtown North
on Mar 18, 2021 at 8:39 am
Tracy Levine, Downtown North
Registered user
on Mar 18, 2021 at 8:39 am

>>>This isn't about race.

>>>Did the police even know he was a minority when he was sound asleep in the dark?

>>>Did they know his name?

The PD obviously had a name and description of the suspect they were looking for so your logic does not hold any water whether the wrongfully detained victim was sleeping or dancing in the dark.

It was racism + reckless and irresponsible use of a police dog and hopefully Mr. Alejo gets every cent of the lawsuit (less attorney fees).


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Mar 18, 2021 at 8:58 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Mar 18, 2021 at 8:58 am

If the police did have his name, saying it's racism is pathetic. The police will do the same thing to a white guy named John Smith. You don't think there are white men in prison or white men falsely accused of crimes, or white men abused by the police? Get real.

Who is really at fault is the resident. If this person knew there was someone in their shed, he/she should've informed the police. It's not like the police knock lightly on the door, asking if they can come in, turn on a light, see his drivers license, etc. They act like cops because they are. They deal with the criminal element.

And if the police had the suspects name, is the suspect the same race as the falsely accused? This is California, and Hispanics outnumber us all. The suspect could very well be of the same race. There's a big difference between racism and realism.


Tracy Levine
Registered user
Downtown North
on Mar 18, 2021 at 9:10 am
Tracy Levine, Downtown North
Registered user
on Mar 18, 2021 at 9:10 am

@Jennifer

The only justifiable excuse for this PD misadventure would be if the victim was (1) an identical twin, (2) with the same last name of the actual suspect and, (3) fleeing the police...rather than being curled-up and sound asleep minding his own business.

The K-9 dog attack with a cop ordering the dog to continue biting an unarmed, sleeping person doesn't bode well either.

If you actually endorse all that transpired during this unfortunate incident...no comment.


Becky Lawrence
Registered user
Community Center
on Mar 18, 2021 at 9:52 am
Becky Lawrence, Community Center
Registered user
on Mar 18, 2021 at 9:52 am

"If the police did have his name, saying it's racism is pathetic."

If the police had the suspect's name and ethnicity, it could have actually triggered a latent or existing sense of personal racism.

"There's a big difference between racism and realism."

Sometimes the two intersect.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Mar 18, 2021 at 9:56 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Mar 18, 2021 at 9:56 am

Tracy -- I never said this was right. My argument is against all those who are saying this is "racism." Not only could the falsely accused be the same race as the suspect, the police officer(s) could easily be the same race. We still live in a society where whites outnumber other races, but it's no longer the case in California. I get sick of everyone throwing "racism" as an excuse as to why things happened, especially involving the police. Has it ever dawned on some people that sometimes things go wrong -- and race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, etc. had NOTHING to do with it?


Becky Lawrence
Registered user
Community Center
on Mar 18, 2021 at 10:01 am
Becky Lawrence, Community Center
Registered user
on Mar 18, 2021 at 10:01 am

-Jennifer

Though everyone (including myself) will adamantly deny it, we are all racist and prejudiced to some point.

Being ethnocentric is racist and having certain reservations about a stranger of a non-white ethnicity can be racist.

White people need to come clean on this issue and I am trying my best as well.

Even the royal family are a bunch of racists!


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