News

Atherton couple donates $80M to Stanford children's hospital, medical school

Funds to support new labor and delivery unit, further Maternal-Fetal Medicine program

The West building of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford will be reimagined as the primary home for services for mothers and babies. The Dunlevies' gift funds new facilities on the first floor. Courtesy Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health.

Atherton residents Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie's donation to Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford is the largest gift from individuals to date for the facility. Courtesy Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health.

An Atherton couple has given $80 million to Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford and Stanford University's School of Medicine to improve the services available to Bay Area mothers and babies.

Elizabeth and Bruce Dunlevie's gift is the largest ever from individuals to the hospital, the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health announced Tuesday.

A majority of the donation — $50 million — will fund a new labor and delivery unit on the first floor of the children's hospital's West building. The unit will include 14 private suites and a maternity antepartum unit for mothers who need to be hospitalized before giving birth.

More than 4,400 babies are delivered each year at the children's hospital in Palo Alto, hospital officials said.

The remaining $30 million will help further the Maternal-Fetal Medicine program at the School of Medicine by hiring more faculty members. With close to two-thirds of expectant mothers at the children's hospital considered at high risk, part of the program's goals is to help expectant mothers with conditions such as heart disease, cancer and epilepsy.

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support Palo Alto Online for as little as $5/month.

Join

"Knowing from personal experience how transformative world-class medical treatment can be for mothers and babies, we're thrilled to help advance the state of the art in medical science for maternal-fetal research, and to give every mother and baby the highest-quality medical care," Bruce Dunlevie said in a statement.

Dunlevie, who has previously served on the Stanford University board of trustees, is chair of the Stanford Management Company board of directors. Elizabeth Dunlevie is chair of the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health.

"The impact of this incredible gift will be felt for generations — for the mothers and babies we help and, perhaps even more importantly, for those we will never have to treat because of new discoveries and cures made possible by this investment," Paul King, Packard Children's Hospital and Stanford Children's Health CEO, said in a statement.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox.

Sign up

Follow Palo Alto Online and the Palo Alto Weekly on Twitter @paloaltoweekly, Facebook and on Instagram @paloaltoonline for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Atherton couple donates $80M to Stanford children's hospital, medical school

Funds to support new labor and delivery unit, further Maternal-Fetal Medicine program

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Feb 17, 2021, 9:21 am

An Atherton couple has given $80 million to Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford and Stanford University's School of Medicine to improve the services available to Bay Area mothers and babies.

Elizabeth and Bruce Dunlevie's gift is the largest ever from individuals to the hospital, the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health announced Tuesday.

A majority of the donation — $50 million — will fund a new labor and delivery unit on the first floor of the children's hospital's West building. The unit will include 14 private suites and a maternity antepartum unit for mothers who need to be hospitalized before giving birth.

More than 4,400 babies are delivered each year at the children's hospital in Palo Alto, hospital officials said.

The remaining $30 million will help further the Maternal-Fetal Medicine program at the School of Medicine by hiring more faculty members. With close to two-thirds of expectant mothers at the children's hospital considered at high risk, part of the program's goals is to help expectant mothers with conditions such as heart disease, cancer and epilepsy.

"Knowing from personal experience how transformative world-class medical treatment can be for mothers and babies, we're thrilled to help advance the state of the art in medical science for maternal-fetal research, and to give every mother and baby the highest-quality medical care," Bruce Dunlevie said in a statement.

Dunlevie, who has previously served on the Stanford University board of trustees, is chair of the Stanford Management Company board of directors. Elizabeth Dunlevie is chair of the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health.

"The impact of this incredible gift will be felt for generations — for the mothers and babies we help and, perhaps even more importantly, for those we will never have to treat because of new discoveries and cures made possible by this investment," Paul King, Packard Children's Hospital and Stanford Children's Health CEO, said in a statement.

Comments

Gary Ruppel
Registered user
Midtown
on Feb 17, 2021 at 10:53 am
Gary Ruppel, Midtown
Registered user
on Feb 17, 2021 at 10:53 am

Wow! What a generous gift by the Dunlevies. Thanks so much.


Midlander
Registered user
Midtown
on Feb 17, 2021 at 4:07 pm
Midlander, Midtown
Registered user
on Feb 17, 2021 at 4:07 pm

What a wonderful gift! Big thanks and respect to the Dunlevies!


Conservative
Registered user
Midtown
on Feb 17, 2021 at 5:54 pm
Conservative, Midtown
Registered user
on Feb 17, 2021 at 5:54 pm

Much respect to the Dunlevie family!


Local
Registered user
Stanford
on Feb 20, 2021 at 8:21 am
Local, Stanford
Registered user
on Feb 20, 2021 at 8:21 am

Amazing by the Dunlevie family - people who support the community like this are incredible.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.