Arts

Tyler MacNiven returns to his Woodside roots via a long, adventurous route

The restauranteur shares his journey in an online talk presented by the Woodside Arts & Culture Committee

At Woodside Arts & Culture Committee's First Friday online talk, Tyler MacNiven shares the story of his unusual journey back to his roots in Woodside and his parents' restaurant, Buck's, which he now co-owns with his brothers. MacNiven, far left, is seen here with his brothers Rowan, center left, and Dylan, center right, with Tyler's son, Aden, and the restaurant's head chef, August Schuchman. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

For Woodside's Tyler MacNiven, the journey home has included a 2,000-mile walk across Japan, an "Amazing Race" and business ventures ranging from film production to home meal kits. He grew up lending a hand at his parents' restaurant, Buck's of Woodside, the well-loved local eatery. But after college, it looked for a time as if MacNiven's future would be in travel or entertainment, or perhaps a combination of the two.

MacNiven shares his unusual trip back to the food world, and to Woodside, in an online talk on Feb. 5 hosted by the Woodside Arts & Culture Committee, part of the committee's First Friday series.

MacNiven first made headlines as a high school student who mounted a political-style campaign to "run" for admission to Stanford University. When it turned out that wasn't in the cards, he attended the University of California, Santa Cruz. Post-college, he backpacked the length of Japan, a distance of 2000 miles, and created a documentary about the experience. He later produced travel documentaries about Iran, Cuba, India and Mongolia.

He also appeared on — and with teammate BJ Averell won — the ninth season of the TV show "The Amazing Race," a reality show that combined travel and competition.

Back in the Bay Area, he opened a restaurant in San Francisco and co-founded meal kit delivery service Sun Basket.

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His latest adventure, which began last year, brought him back to the Midpeninsula to join his brothers, Dylan and Rowan, in taking over ownership of Buck's from their parents, Jamis and Margaret MacNiven, following their retirement.

This year marks the restaurant's 30th year in business.

MacNiven's talk takes place Feb. 5, 7 p.m. For more information, visit woodsideartandculture.org.

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Heather Zimmerman
Heather Zimmerman has been with Embarcadero Media since 2019. She writes and edits arts stories, compiles the Weekend Express newsletter, curates the community calendar, helps edit stories for the Voice and The Almanac and assists with assembling the Express newsletters for those publications. Read more >>

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Tyler MacNiven returns to his Woodside roots via a long, adventurous route

The restauranteur shares his journey in an online talk presented by the Woodside Arts & Culture Committee

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Feb 3, 2021, 11:22 am

For Woodside's Tyler MacNiven, the journey home has included a 2,000-mile walk across Japan, an "Amazing Race" and business ventures ranging from film production to home meal kits. He grew up lending a hand at his parents' restaurant, Buck's of Woodside, the well-loved local eatery. But after college, it looked for a time as if MacNiven's future would be in travel or entertainment, or perhaps a combination of the two.

MacNiven shares his unusual trip back to the food world, and to Woodside, in an online talk on Feb. 5 hosted by the Woodside Arts & Culture Committee, part of the committee's First Friday series.

MacNiven first made headlines as a high school student who mounted a political-style campaign to "run" for admission to Stanford University. When it turned out that wasn't in the cards, he attended the University of California, Santa Cruz. Post-college, he backpacked the length of Japan, a distance of 2000 miles, and created a documentary about the experience. He later produced travel documentaries about Iran, Cuba, India and Mongolia.

He also appeared on — and with teammate BJ Averell won — the ninth season of the TV show "The Amazing Race," a reality show that combined travel and competition.

Back in the Bay Area, he opened a restaurant in San Francisco and co-founded meal kit delivery service Sun Basket.

His latest adventure, which began last year, brought him back to the Midpeninsula to join his brothers, Dylan and Rowan, in taking over ownership of Buck's from their parents, Jamis and Margaret MacNiven, following their retirement.

This year marks the restaurant's 30th year in business.

MacNiven's talk takes place Feb. 5, 7 p.m. For more information, visit woodsideartandculture.org.

Comments

Ron Wolf
Registered user
Mountain View
on Feb 5, 2021 at 12:53 pm
Ron Wolf, Mountain View
Registered user
on Feb 5, 2021 at 12:53 pm

My well researched opinion - we are fortunate to have this wonderful family run restaurant in our community. I look forward to more in-person research at Bucks!


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