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Fentanyl deaths rising steeply, Santa Clara County officials say

Medical examiner-coroner: High number is 'extremely troubling and worrisome'

Fentanyl deaths in Santa Clara County have nearly doubled this year compared to 2019, the county medical examiner-coroner's office said Friday.

Fentanyl-laced pills tend to be blue, circular tablets with an embossed "M" on one side and "30" on the other. Courtesy Santa Clara County.

The medical examiner has confirmed 53 fentanyl overdose deaths in 2020, up from the 29 such deaths the office confirmed last year. County officials also expect additional fentanyl-related deaths before the year ends.

According to Medical Examiner-Coroner Dr. Michelle Jordan, fentanyl overdoses have been confirmed in residents as young as 16 and as old as 60 years old.

"The high number of fentanyl deaths this year is extremely troubling and worrisome, especially as we see it happening to both teenagers and adults, particularly young adults," Jordan said.

Fentanyl is a highly addictive opioid and can be up to 100 times more potent than morphine. It's often found in fake pills or mixed with other drugs.

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The medical examiner's office encourages residents to call 911 if someone cannot be woken up or is breathing irregularly after ingesting pills or powder of unknown origin.

Drugs like Narcan can be lifesaving in such situations, said Bruce Copley, the director of the county's Substance Use Services Division within the Department of Behavioral Health Services.

"Fentanyl is a very powerful opioid drug and can kill in a matter of minutes," Copley said. "The risk of death increases if a person takes these drugs alone."

Residents can obtain free training in administering Narcan at the Santa Clara County Overdose Prevention Project's Central Valley clinic at 2425 Enborg Lane in San Jose; Alexian Health clinic at 2101 Alexian Drive, Suite B, in San Jose; and South County clinic at 90 Highland Ave., Building J, in San Martin.

Residents can also receive fentanyl test strips from the county for free.

Information on the county's Substance Use Services Division and substance use treatment options can be found here.

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Fentanyl deaths rising steeply, Santa Clara County officials say

Medical examiner-coroner: High number is 'extremely troubling and worrisome'

by /

Uploaded: Sun, Nov 22, 2020, 8:56 am

Fentanyl deaths in Santa Clara County have nearly doubled this year compared to 2019, the county medical examiner-coroner's office said Friday.

The medical examiner has confirmed 53 fentanyl overdose deaths in 2020, up from the 29 such deaths the office confirmed last year. County officials also expect additional fentanyl-related deaths before the year ends.

According to Medical Examiner-Coroner Dr. Michelle Jordan, fentanyl overdoses have been confirmed in residents as young as 16 and as old as 60 years old.

"The high number of fentanyl deaths this year is extremely troubling and worrisome, especially as we see it happening to both teenagers and adults, particularly young adults," Jordan said.

Fentanyl is a highly addictive opioid and can be up to 100 times more potent than morphine. It's often found in fake pills or mixed with other drugs.

The medical examiner's office encourages residents to call 911 if someone cannot be woken up or is breathing irregularly after ingesting pills or powder of unknown origin.

Drugs like Narcan can be lifesaving in such situations, said Bruce Copley, the director of the county's Substance Use Services Division within the Department of Behavioral Health Services.

"Fentanyl is a very powerful opioid drug and can kill in a matter of minutes," Copley said. "The risk of death increases if a person takes these drugs alone."

Residents can obtain free training in administering Narcan at the Santa Clara County Overdose Prevention Project's Central Valley clinic at 2425 Enborg Lane in San Jose; Alexian Health clinic at 2101 Alexian Drive, Suite B, in San Jose; and South County clinic at 90 Highland Ave., Building J, in San Martin.

Residents can also receive fentanyl test strips from the county for free.

Information on the county's Substance Use Services Division and substance use treatment options can be found here.

Comments

Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 22, 2020 at 10:49 am
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 22, 2020 at 10:49 am
25 people like this

[Post removed.]


Me 2
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 22, 2020 at 3:16 pm
Me 2, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Nov 22, 2020 at 3:16 pm
11 people like this

Lockdowns are not cost free.

Still no word on what the cT values are for these COVID-19 test results. If they are still using inflated cT values to make policy decisions, then the blame for these deaths rests with the our government.

Also note where the source of much of the fentanyl is.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 22, 2020 at 6:14 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 22, 2020 at 6:14 pm
41 people like this

According to the DEA, the fetanyl flow originates in China & then it is trafficked.

Web Link


Jen
Registered user
Mountain View
on Nov 22, 2020 at 7:31 pm
Jen, Mountain View
Registered user
on Nov 22, 2020 at 7:31 pm
3 people like this

I am not a Santa Clara resident, but I have friends that live there. You think your guys have a problem more than 450 deaths in August alone in San Francisco. Post something about your worries when it reaches over 400 in one month. I bet some of those overdose deaths were not even Santa Clara County residents, I guarantee that a good amount of them were homeless from San Francisco out there to sell from your shops.

I will include a link to the story I am referring to.

Web Link


Anonymous
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 22, 2020 at 10:56 pm
Anonymous, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Nov 22, 2020 at 10:56 pm
5 people like this

A major SF politician seeks to legalize an array of drugs...small quantities. I strongly oppose this. I gather Oregon is ok with this unnecessary risk.
Ok, suppose you are liberal or libertarian...do realize:
Driving while on drugs will lead to deaths of innocent people.
Meanwhile, please don’t choose to do drugs - nothing good can come of it.
Help others to make better choices.
Look at San Francisco!
What a failure of politicians and their costly coddling of drug addicted on the streets!
Another tech leader has had enough and is moving to Florida.
Let’s keep Santa Clara County/Silicon Valley a productive, happy place.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 23, 2020 at 6:39 am
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 23, 2020 at 6:39 am
39 people like this

>"A major SF politician seeks to legalize an array of drugs...small quantities."

^ Legalized marijuana is one thing as no one dies from it. The legalization of highly addictive, powerful & illicit pharmaceuticals is another matter.

Allowing homeless heroin, fentanyl & methamphetamine addicts to roam freely will in turn pose further problems for law enforcement & could potentially lead to more police shootings & killings where suspect coherency is in question.

>"Look at San Francisco! What a failure of politicians and their costly coddling of drug addicted on the streets!

^ A bad idea...perhaps best to round up all of the homeless addicts & place them in state run rehab facilities & asylums under adult conservatorships.

The most challenging problem is cutting off the flow of fentanyl & opium derived drugs as China, Afghanistan & Mexico are fully vested in the trafficking.

And as far as domestic meth labs are concerned, they tend to proliferate in rural counties so there's an obvious place to start/maintain the eradication process...they also pose a major fire hazard.

'Breaking Bad' in the USA essentially amounts to rounding up the addicts & destroying the drug sources.


Take good care...
Registered user
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 23, 2020 at 12:34 pm
Take good care..., Another Palo Alto neighborhood
Registered user
on Nov 23, 2020 at 12:34 pm
4 people like this

Please do not ingest pills bought from criminals. You cannot possibly know what is in them. There are public safety reasons why our government controls certain pharmaceuticals. Take what a doctor prescribes only, and do that with care. Buy only from a pharmacist, and be very careful about taking ONLY what you really need. While I understand that some doctors and pharmaceutical companies have actied criminally in this matter, we all need to take care of ourselves and that requires being educated, thoughtful, careful patients.

The danger of these drugs is terrible. Your lives matter to us all.


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