News

Newsom pulls 'emergency brake' on COVID-19 response, jumping Santa Clara County to 'purple' tier

State moves counties back to stricter reopening levels this Tuesday

Indoor dining in Santa Clara County — such as in Rumblefish in downtown Mountain View — is banned again under renewed public health restrictions announced on Nov. 13. Photo taken March 12 by Magali Gauthier.

In a rapid attempt to stanch the spread of COVID-19, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday issued new orders to pull the "emergency brake" on the virus, pushing San Mateo County back into the "red tier" or substantial risk of infection, and Santa Clara County back two tiers from orange (moderate risk) to purple (widespread risk), the most restrictive. The change is effective starting Tuesday, Nov. 17.

"We are sounding the alarm. California is experiencing the fastest increase in cases we have seen yet — faster than what we experienced at the outset of the pandemic or even this summer. The spread of COVID-19, if left unchecked, could quickly overwhelm our health care system and lead to catastrophic outcomes. That is why we are pulling an emergency brake in the Blueprint for a Safer Economy. Now is the time to do all we can — government at all levels and Californians across the state — to flatten the curve again as we have done before."

Gov. Gavin Newsom announces which California counties are moving to more restrictive tiers under the state's Blueprint for a Safer Economy on Nov. 16. Courtesy California Governor Gavin Newsom's YouTube channel.

The return to a red tier will mean that San Mateo County restaurants must limit indoor dining to 25% of capacity and other businesses, such as fitness centers, will face additional restrictions.

Under the purple tier, restaurants are limited to outdoor service only and only outdoor gatherings in Santa Clara County are allowed for places of worship, museums, family entertainment centers, movies, and professional sports (without live audiences). All retail, including shopping malls, are restricted to 25% of capacity. A full list of what's regulated can be found here.

Santa Clara County officials had already announced on Nov. 13 that they would again ban indoor dining and add other yet-to-be determined restrictions to public gatherings in response to a rapid rise in COVID-19 cases.

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It was the second time in a week that the county addressed the growth in coronavirus cases. Leaders said the new restrictions come as the infection rate and hospitalizations have continued to increase since Nov. 9. The increased infection rates within the county mirror trends seen across the Bay Area, the state and in many other parts of the country, county Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody said at a press conference. Other health officers in most Bay Area counties are expected to announce similar restrictions, she said last Friday.

"Unfortunately, I'm here to deliver more sobering news," Cody said. "It is absolutely imperative that we take action now."

The local curve has been shooting "straight up" since about Nov. 3, she said. "The steepness of that curve required that we act swiftly."

On Nov. 16 during a press conference in San Jose, Cody reiterated the importance of adhering to state and county guidelines regarding social distancing, wearing masks and business compliance with restrictions.

Santa Clara County had 388 new confirmed cases on Nov. 16. Although she did not yet have a count of new hospitalizations, on Nov. 13 she said there were 110 hospitalizations, an increase from an average of 80 hospitalizations per day in October.

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"Unfortunately, we may be needing to take additional restrictions quickly," Cody said. "We do not take these actions lightly. … These are extraordinarily difficult decisions to make," she said on Nov. 13.

She added an urgency on Monday: "We have done this before. We can do this again. We need every citizen and business in our county to take this extremely seriously," she said.

Santa Clara and San Mateo counties were in the less-restrictive orange tier, but rather than waiting 72 hours to implement the new restrictions, the state has moved up enforcement to Tuesday. Santa Clara County had expected a step backward into the red tier, but the state also shortened the lag in data, which is why the county was pushed into the purple tier, County Counsel James Williams said on Monday.

Schools that have not yet opened will be prohibited from reopening until at least two weeks after the county is removed from the purple-tier designation. Those schools having already reopened can continue without interruption, and those in phased reopening can continue to reopen under their phased schedules under the state's law, he said. Elementary schools can also seek waivers based on their individual safety plans, he added.

The county is working on a plan for how to distribute COVID-19 vaccines when they become available, Cody said. Since there are many different types, they will likely fit different groups and will have different storage and handling requirements, complications that will make logistics complex, she said on Monday.

Michelle Ortega, center right, a b8ta tester for the Palo Alto store, assists Eleanor Rieffel, center left, alongside Rieffel's father Marc Rieffel and nephew Gilbert Cranton in the store on Aug. 17, 2017. Embarcadero Media File photo by Veronica Weber.

Williams and Cody reiterated statements they made last Friday about the effectiveness of stepping back with more restrictions as the number of cases rise.

"One of the lessons we have learned and demonstrated in March and July (when there were also steep rises in COVID-19 cases) is that acting quickly helps bring things under control faster," Williams said last Friday regarding the county's decision to move faster to implement the restrictions than state guidelines.

Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors President Cindy Chavez said on Friday that she realizes that people are growing weary of the restrictions.

"As a community we tried really hard to fight this back," she said. "So this is really bad news and it's really hard to hear. We've all got to dig in and really double down."

She noted that many schools plan to reopen in January or this spring, but that could be hampered by the growing virus rates.

"It is a call to action," she said, "to do a little more or to return to being more vigilant if people have been slacking."

Watch the full Nov. 13 press conference:

Santa Clara County leaders discuss new local restrictions in response to a rise in COVID-19 cases at a press conference in San Jose on Nov. 13 Courtesy Santa Clara County Public Health Department.

Find comprehensive coverage on the Midpeninsula's response to the new coronavirus by Palo Alto Online, the Mountain View Voice and the Almanac here.

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Newsom pulls 'emergency brake' on COVID-19 response, jumping Santa Clara County to 'purple' tier

State moves counties back to stricter reopening levels this Tuesday

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Fri, Nov 13, 2020, 2:32 pm
Updated: Mon, Nov 16, 2020, 3:41 pm

In a rapid attempt to stanch the spread of COVID-19, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday issued new orders to pull the "emergency brake" on the virus, pushing San Mateo County back into the "red tier" or substantial risk of infection, and Santa Clara County back two tiers from orange (moderate risk) to purple (widespread risk), the most restrictive. The change is effective starting Tuesday, Nov. 17.

"We are sounding the alarm. California is experiencing the fastest increase in cases we have seen yet — faster than what we experienced at the outset of the pandemic or even this summer. The spread of COVID-19, if left unchecked, could quickly overwhelm our health care system and lead to catastrophic outcomes. That is why we are pulling an emergency brake in the Blueprint for a Safer Economy. Now is the time to do all we can — government at all levels and Californians across the state — to flatten the curve again as we have done before."

The return to a red tier will mean that San Mateo County restaurants must limit indoor dining to 25% of capacity and other businesses, such as fitness centers, will face additional restrictions.

Under the purple tier, restaurants are limited to outdoor service only and only outdoor gatherings in Santa Clara County are allowed for places of worship, museums, family entertainment centers, movies, and professional sports (without live audiences). All retail, including shopping malls, are restricted to 25% of capacity. A full list of what's regulated can be found here.

Santa Clara County officials had already announced on Nov. 13 that they would again ban indoor dining and add other yet-to-be determined restrictions to public gatherings in response to a rapid rise in COVID-19 cases.

It was the second time in a week that the county addressed the growth in coronavirus cases. Leaders said the new restrictions come as the infection rate and hospitalizations have continued to increase since Nov. 9. The increased infection rates within the county mirror trends seen across the Bay Area, the state and in many other parts of the country, county Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody said at a press conference. Other health officers in most Bay Area counties are expected to announce similar restrictions, she said last Friday.

"Unfortunately, I'm here to deliver more sobering news," Cody said. "It is absolutely imperative that we take action now."

The local curve has been shooting "straight up" since about Nov. 3, she said. "The steepness of that curve required that we act swiftly."

On Nov. 16 during a press conference in San Jose, Cody reiterated the importance of adhering to state and county guidelines regarding social distancing, wearing masks and business compliance with restrictions.

Santa Clara County had 388 new confirmed cases on Nov. 16. Although she did not yet have a count of new hospitalizations, on Nov. 13 she said there were 110 hospitalizations, an increase from an average of 80 hospitalizations per day in October.

"Unfortunately, we may be needing to take additional restrictions quickly," Cody said. "We do not take these actions lightly. … These are extraordinarily difficult decisions to make," she said on Nov. 13.

She added an urgency on Monday: "We have done this before. We can do this again. We need every citizen and business in our county to take this extremely seriously," she said.

Santa Clara and San Mateo counties were in the less-restrictive orange tier, but rather than waiting 72 hours to implement the new restrictions, the state has moved up enforcement to Tuesday. Santa Clara County had expected a step backward into the red tier, but the state also shortened the lag in data, which is why the county was pushed into the purple tier, County Counsel James Williams said on Monday.

Schools that have not yet opened will be prohibited from reopening until at least two weeks after the county is removed from the purple-tier designation. Those schools having already reopened can continue without interruption, and those in phased reopening can continue to reopen under their phased schedules under the state's law, he said. Elementary schools can also seek waivers based on their individual safety plans, he added.

The county is working on a plan for how to distribute COVID-19 vaccines when they become available, Cody said. Since there are many different types, they will likely fit different groups and will have different storage and handling requirements, complications that will make logistics complex, she said on Monday.

Williams and Cody reiterated statements they made last Friday about the effectiveness of stepping back with more restrictions as the number of cases rise.

"One of the lessons we have learned and demonstrated in March and July (when there were also steep rises in COVID-19 cases) is that acting quickly helps bring things under control faster," Williams said last Friday regarding the county's decision to move faster to implement the restrictions than state guidelines.

Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors President Cindy Chavez said on Friday that she realizes that people are growing weary of the restrictions.

"As a community we tried really hard to fight this back," she said. "So this is really bad news and it's really hard to hear. We've all got to dig in and really double down."

She noted that many schools plan to reopen in January or this spring, but that could be hampered by the growing virus rates.

"It is a call to action," she said, "to do a little more or to return to being more vigilant if people have been slacking."

Watch the full Nov. 13 press conference:

Find comprehensive coverage on the Midpeninsula's response to the new coronavirus by Palo Alto Online, the Mountain View Voice and the Almanac here.

Comments

Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 13, 2020 at 4:33 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 13, 2020 at 4:33 pm
59 people like this

A tough call...especially for small businesses (i.e. restaurant/bars) & younger folks who like to step out & socialize but the temporary restrictions appear necessary given the current spike in Covid-19 cases not only nationwide but throughout CA as well.

I suspect that the coronavirus is mutating on its own...making matters even more challenging in regards to ensuring an all-inclusive safe & effective vaccine.


TimR
Registered user
Downtown North
on Nov 13, 2020 at 10:10 pm
TimR, Downtown North
Registered user
on Nov 13, 2020 at 10:10 pm
12 people like this

Researchers at Stanford University and Northwestern University recently released a study saying gyms, restaurants and hotels are the top places the virus spreads. And other stats say East San Jose is the #1 hotspot in SCC. So, does that mean ESJ has more gyms, restaurants and hotels than other parts of the county? If not, things don't add up here, and there's something else going on.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 14, 2020 at 6:07 am
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 14, 2020 at 6:07 am
66 people like this

>"....other stats say East San Jose is the #1 hotspot in SCC. So, does that mean ESJ has more gyms, restaurants and hotels than other parts of the county?

^ Stats attributable to dense population, compressed living environments, & lack of convenient access to health care services...symptomatic of many poorer areas on the United States.


TimR
Registered user
Downtown North
on Nov 14, 2020 at 4:42 pm
TimR, Downtown North
Registered user
on Nov 14, 2020 at 4:42 pm
13 people like this

Lee Forrest, "Stats attributable to dense population, compressed living environments, & lack of convenient access to health care services...symptomatic of many poorer areas on the United States."

Except at least one study* has shown that dense population is NOT a risk factor for the spread of the virus. As for lack of access to healthcare, that's much, much more a rural problem. And free, convenient testing is now readily available in SCC (I've gone in for one test at a county site, and it is indeed very easy and hassle-free). For some unknown (or at least un-reported) reason(s), ESJ is the main problem in SCC, yet gyms, etc, throughout the county are being blamed and will take the fall. Makes no sense.

*Web Link


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 14, 2020 at 6:33 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 14, 2020 at 6:33 pm
16 people like this

>"For some unknown (or at least un-reported) reason(s), ESJ is the main problem in SCC..."

^ Another possibility in addition to advanced age & pre-existing medical conditions...genetics?

Recent studies are starting to dispel population density as a primary factor but the infection rates among various populations remain a mystery.

Web Link


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Nov 15, 2020 at 7:22 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2020 at 7:22 am
11 people like this

Cooler weather will worsen the spread. Medical professionals know this, and they knew it was coming.


Rebecca Eisenberg
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 15, 2020 at 10:31 pm
Rebecca Eisenberg, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Nov 15, 2020 at 10:31 pm
62 people like this

Hopefully this will trigger the School Board to retract their unpopular, unrealistic, and irresponsible plan to re-open schools in the way they approved -- hated by teachers, parents, and students alike.


jr1
Registered user
Greenmeadow
on Nov 16, 2020 at 10:56 am
jr1, Greenmeadow
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 10:56 am
14 people like this

My cousin was in Spain earlier this year when they had a hard shutdown for five weeks. He was able to leave the room he was in for 1 hour and 15 minutes a week. The hard shut down in Spain was not very effective, and I doubt another shutdown here will be very effective. The vaccine developed by American companies will be the solution. I'm hopefully the American government can get the distribution done correctly.


Jonathan Brown
Registered user
Ventura
on Nov 16, 2020 at 11:05 am
Jonathan Brown, Ventura
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 11:05 am
18 people like this

It's baffling to me that we're in the heart of Silicon Valley and we're not able to perform contact tracing and testing sufficient to pinpoint with any finer grain of detail what's causing these increases. As a result, the blunt hammer of "red tier" and "everyone needs to do better" is being used when a scalpel directed at what should be a very small subset of behaviors and people should be used. If it's indoor use of gyms or restaurants, focus on pausing those and let other activities that have zero evidence of transmission proceed. (E.g., if the increase is in no way related to the reopening of elementary schools, we should know that.).


Palo Alto parent
Registered user
Charleston Meadows
on Nov 16, 2020 at 11:05 am
Palo Alto parent, Charleston Meadows
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 11:05 am
13 people like this

Shutdown of non-essential entertainment like indoor dining and bars is necessary. In-person schools for young students need to stay as they are essential, and little children are not shown to spread the virus. Countries like France and Germany understand this - full lockdown, with schools staying open. Palo Alto elementary schools have done amazingly with enacting safety measures, and children are alive again even if in school half time. Hopefully, adults' insistence on being entertained with bars and parties doesn't take it away from them again.


Duveneck neighbor
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 16, 2020 at 11:15 am
Duveneck neighbor, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 11:15 am
16 people like this

Too many of the comments so far express opinions which are false based upon scientific evidence.

We have a truth crisis in this country. Giving vent to opinions generated in one’s echo chamber generates great harm. The Editor should require links to trusted sources in order to support opinions.

Anecdotal evidence is IMO valid. But, generalizations based solely upon anecdotal evidence should also be questioned closely.


jr1
Registered user
Greenmeadow
on Nov 16, 2020 at 11:32 am
jr1, Greenmeadow
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 11:32 am
17 people like this

I think Santa Clara County residents have done very well adhering to the suggestion by the County Health Department. They certainly made plenty, and the results failed. As I earlier stated, my cousin was in Spain when the virus first hit, and was prevented from leaving the room (and country) he was in for over 5.5 weeks (I just checked the dates). He was only allowed out to purchase food for 75 minutes a week and had to wear a mask. I cannot give you verification on the exact time he was able to leave the condo. I don't think any country, of the 186 have had any luck controlling the virus, and numerous attempts have certainly be made. Scientific facts have been wrong on numerous times, I will give them the credit they are trying. Americans need to remember our government is not at fault, China is the country that spread this virus to 186 countries. Regardless of who is leading the country, things will not improve until a vaccine is approved and distributed. Most of us recognize the US Government may mean well but are often not equipped to solve problems.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 16, 2020 at 1:04 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 1:04 pm
15 people like this

>"It's baffling to me that we're in the heart of Silicon Valley and we're not able to perform contact tracing and testing sufficient to pinpoint with any finer grain of detail what's causing these increases."

^ As far as contact tracing goes...given the invasive character of factory-installed Google & Apple smartphone apps that border on invasion of privacy, tracking ANYBODY should be a breeze.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Nov 16, 2020 at 1:58 pm
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 1:58 pm
17 people like this

And now most of the state will be in the purple zone. I feel like we're in prison, without possibility of parole. Newsom also wants a "statewide curfew." How the heck would you enforce that?


No school reopening
Registered user
Fairmeadow
on Nov 16, 2020 at 2:02 pm
No school reopening, Fairmeadow
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 2:02 pm
2 people like this

Looks like the state is putting Santa Clara County back in Purple tier:

Web Link

Per the FAQ, that means that schools are not allowed to open:

Web Link

"Schools in the Widespread (purple) tier aren’t permitted to reopen for in-person instruction, unless they receive a waiver from their local health department for grades TK-6. However, they may provide supervision of children in accordance with the cohorts guidance."


some other information
Registered user
College Terrace
on Nov 16, 2020 at 2:15 pm
some other information, College Terrace
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 2:15 pm
4 people like this

Elementary school kids in hybrid schooling can stay there: "Schools that have reopened for in-person instruction are not required to close if their county moves back to the Widespread (purple) tier."


Chris
Registered user
University South
on Nov 16, 2020 at 3:15 pm
Chris, University South
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 3:15 pm
10 people like this

A curfew is enforced against people are on the street or in public during certain times.

Hopefully, people will start wearing masks all the time.

The young women demonstrating on Embarcadero against Dr Cody and wearing masks are an embarrassment to Palo Alto.

Also, East San Jose has very high COVID rates, but so does East Palo Alto. COVID is right here. The stats tell you where people live, not where there work or travel. People from ESJ and EPA are present in Palo Alto.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 16, 2020 at 3:32 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 3:32 pm
33 people like this

>"Newsom also wants a "statewide curfew." How the heck would you enforce that?"

^ Enlist the National Guard & enforce marshall law?

As far as 'staying put' & setting a good example as per state public health mandates, let's hope that the governor himself practices a tad more restraint before heading out to The French Laundry in Napa Valley for another lavish dinner gathering.


jr1
Registered user
Greenmeadow
on Nov 16, 2020 at 4:52 pm
jr1, Greenmeadow
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 4:52 pm
6 people like this

Hopefully, the vaccines developed by American companies will help eliminate the virus. One thing we have learned the government doesn't have the solution, normally solutions come from the private sector. The government may help with financial resources to develop a solution. Hopefully here is another example, the American private sector will solve the problem.


Chris
Registered user
University South
on Nov 16, 2020 at 5:10 pm
Chris, University South
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 5:10 pm
12 people like this

With the blast from SCC on our phones, nobody has an excuse for not knowing we are now PURPLE.


Jane
Registered user
Ventura
on Nov 16, 2020 at 5:41 pm
Jane, Ventura
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 5:41 pm
37 people like this

This is absurd. Lockdowns multiply the harm. We're trying to stop a tidal wave and we're forcing people to drown.

We cannot allow this kind of arbitrary, unlimited, indefinite control over people's personal lives and commerce by one guy with no say by the electorate.

[Portion removed.]


Jane
Registered user
Ventura
on Nov 16, 2020 at 5:47 pm
Jane, Ventura
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 5:47 pm
7 people like this

[Post removed.]


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 16, 2020 at 6:58 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 6:58 pm
19 people like this

>"We cannot allow this kind of arbitrary, unlimited, indefinite control over people's personal lives.."

^ A very controversial issue...enforced public health mandates vs the constitutional right to gather and/or move about freely.

Various churches including the Diocese of Brooklyn & Orthodox Jews in New York are challenging these public health restrictions/mandates & taking it to the SCOTUS.


chris
Registered user
University South
on Nov 16, 2020 at 7:25 pm
chris, University South
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 7:25 pm
20 people like this

Jane,

We need to pull together for the safety of all. You are promoting unfounded fears for the benefit of whom?


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 16, 2020 at 8:01 pm
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 8:01 pm
32 people like this

>"We need to pull together for the safety of all."

^ During this time of pandemic, it is unfortunate that countless individuals do not share your view.

Wearing a face mask to protect oneself (along with others) from the potential spread of Covid-19 is in some ways, no different than wearing seatbelts while operating a motor vehicle...a basic precautionary measure.


Jeremy E.
Registered user
Midtown
on Nov 16, 2020 at 9:02 pm
Jeremy E., Midtown
Registered user
on Nov 16, 2020 at 9:02 pm
11 people like this

I thought the point of the state's 4-tier system was to determine what could and could not be open based on clear measurements, and to provide clear timetables for switches between tiers so that businesses and workers wouldn't be caught surprised by sudden changes, including tug-of-wars between county and state guidelines.

Apparently, though, these metrics and timetables mean nothing if the state decides otherwise, and the county and state governments are incapable of communicating about such important issues more than a day in advance, people's livelihoods be damned.

"...rather than waiting 72 hours to implement the new restrictions, the state has moved up enforcement to Tuesday. Santa Clara County had expected a step backward into the red tier, but the state also shortened the lag in data, which is why the county was pushed into the purple tier, County Counsel James Williams said on Monday."


Chris
Registered user
University South
on Nov 17, 2020 at 7:15 am
Chris, University South
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2020 at 7:15 am
9 people like this

Jeremy,

We are in an exploding crisis and you want to delay action. Given the exponential increase, why would you want to wait so that the hospitals will be packed. Given what is happening, a lot of people were not being cautious. This move was needed to get their attention.


How to help the hotspot areas
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 17, 2020 at 9:04 am
How to help the hotspot areas, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2020 at 9:04 am
5 people like this

Do you know where to donate masks and hand sanitizer in the hotspot areas in Santa Clara County? Thank you


MVresident2003
Mountain View

Registered user
on Nov 17, 2020 at 10:37 am
Name hidden, Mountain View

Registered user
on Nov 17, 2020 at 10:37 am

Due to violations of our Terms of Use, comments from this poster are only visible to registered users who are logged in. Use the links at the top of the page to Register or Login.


Me 2
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 17, 2020 at 11:32 am
Me 2, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2020 at 11:32 am
9 people like this

And we still don't know what the cT (cycle threshold) values for these positive PCR tests.

It's criminal to enforce a shutdown if we're using testing that shows that >35 is still considered positive. It has shown to inflate counts dramatically.

And it's the failure of the Fourth Estate here in California to not dig into why the state is not being transparent.


Roger Dodger
Registered user
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 17, 2020 at 12:04 pm
Roger Dodger, Old Palo Alto
Registered user
on Nov 17, 2020 at 12:04 pm
5 people like this

"Why should I have to use headlights? I can see perfectly well in the dark. You can use them if you feel like you need to, but don't let your snowflake fear of the dark impinge on my personal liberty."


Dick D.
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 18, 2020 at 2:00 am
Dick D., Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 18, 2020 at 2:00 am
5 people like this

Concerning masks and the other associated things and behaviors we're asked to do towards "defeating" the virus, or at least reducing the scale of the problem. A number of the contributors got close to it, but don't say directly – "the common good" . . . freedom to do what we want to do, BUT within the practical bounds of the "common good". I'd like to run up my Lamborghini over 200 mph down El Camino, but I don't 'cause of speed LIMITS for the common good. (My freedom has been taken away from me!)

On a different tack, but please don't label me a "big government freak" . . . Many focus their attention "as the cause of restrictions" purely and solely due to various government officials, ignoring the underlying cause being the virus. Government officials, who make mistakes like all of us, are trying their best to deal with this gigantic health problem, hardly of their making.


Lee Forrest
Registered user
Crescent Park
on Nov 18, 2020 at 8:01 am
Lee Forrest, Crescent Park
Registered user
on Nov 18, 2020 at 8:01 am
8 people like this

>"I'd like to run up my Lamborghini over 200 mph down El Camino, but I don't 'cause of speed LIMITS for the common good."

^Another factor...the countless traffic signals along ECR would prevent the reality of such an endeavor & chances are, you wouldn't advance past 2nd gear at best.

Interstate 5/Central Valley would be your best bet.


Jennifer
Registered user
another community
on Nov 18, 2020 at 9:20 am
Jennifer, another community
Registered user
on Nov 18, 2020 at 9:20 am
3 people like this

The flu and pneumonia are "gigantic health problems" that kill millions annually, yet you don't see the mask wearing, social distancing or worldwide shutdowns.


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