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Challenger outraises six opponents in East Palo Alto City Council race by lending money to his own campaign

Two newcomers lead way in campaign funds, but incumbent finds support solely through donations

From left to right, top to bottom: Lisa Gauthier, Stewart Hyland, Webster Lincoln, Antonio Lopez, Juan Mendez, Larry Moody and Carlos Romero are running for the East Palo Alto City Council this fall. Webster Lincoln photo courtesy of the candidate. All other photos by Magali Gauthier.

With Election Day fast approaching, Webster Lincoln, one of four newcomers vying for a seat on the East Palo Alto City Council, leads the way in campaign contributions over his six opponents, raising $18,005.69 as of Oct. 17, the latest finance disclosures show.

Documents show that $13,872.69, or more than 75% of his campaign funds, came from Lincoln's own pocket. The rest of his funds, $4,133, came from individual donations, ranging from $100 to $500.

The contributions include $500 from his mother, Niambi Lincoln, current manager at the Palo Alto Park Mutual Water Company; $500 from Katherine Loudd, Lincoln's grandmother and former manager at the water company; $500 from William Treseder, a senior vice president of product at Palo Alto tech company BMNT; and $250 from Catherine Burton, a Sequoia Union High School District teacher.

Behind Lincoln, fellow newcomer Antonio Lopez raised $16,451.79. Most of Lopez's funds came from individual donations ranging between $100 and $500. As of Oct. 17, his campaign had raised $14,540.

The 26-year-old doctoral candidate in literature at Stanford University received a substantial pool of donations from staff, faculty and colleagues from his alma maters, local schools and other educational institutions. Several contributions came from various Menlo School faculty members, including a $104 donation from Head of School Than Healy.

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Documents also show contributions from donors in the publishing and writing sphere, including San Mateo County poet laureate Aileen Cassinetto, and from real estate investment firms, including Blair Volckmann, a partner at Harvest Properties, the Oakland-based developer that purchased 17 acres near Bay Road and Weeks Street last year, according to the San Francisco Business Times.

While a majority of the contributions, almost 70%, came in within a single month, from Sept. 18 to Oct. 17, the rest of the money came from Lopez, who lent his campaign $2,365.

Larry Moody, the former mayor and vice mayor who is seeking a third term on council, received support from local politicians, real estate agents and investors, tech employees and the East Palo Alto Police Officers Association, according to documents.

In total, the longtime East Palo Alto resident raised $14,755 for his campaign, solely through donations.

Contributions include $500 from San Mateo County Supervisor Warren Slocum; $500 from John Pimentel, a candidate for the San Mateo County Community College District Board of Trustees; $250 from Santa Clara County Supervisor Joe Simitian; $250 from Pat Burt, a former mayor looking to return to the Palo Alto City Council this fall; $200 from state Senate candidate Josh Becker; and $100 from Gisell Hale, a council candidate for Redwood City.

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Moody also received several contributions from employees tied to the tech industry, including $200 from Juan Salazar, a public policy manager at Facebook. A few donations also came from real estate agents and investors, such as a $250 contribution from Michael Kramer, managing director of Sand Hill Property Company, which has a few investments in the city.

The campaigns of incumbent Lisa Gauthier and Juan Mendez, the youngest candidate in the race, have raised substantially less money.

Gauthier's campaign raised $4,205 through donations and loans she provided.

Contributions to the former mayor's re-election efforts include $100 to $500 donations from some of the same individuals who also supported Moody's campaign — Becker, Burt, Pimentel and Salazar.

Leigh Morgan, former chief operating officer at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, who lives in Seattle, also donated $250 to Gauthier's campaign, as well as Azalea Renfield, community services manager at the City Manager's office, who donated $500.

Documents submitted Oct. 30 show that Mendez's campaign received $2,357.63 and came primarily through two sources: a pool of smaller contributions of less than $100 — which means Mendez's campaign does not have to disclose any identifying information on those donors or the dollar amount they gave — and founding CEO of Silicon Valley Bank Roger Smith, who gave $500 to the campaign. There were a few other contributions in the $190 to $400 range, including one from former San Jose City Council candidate Jenny Higgins.

Stewart Hyland, organizing director at the Housing Leadership Council of San Mateo County, initially did not intend to raise more than $2,000 for his campaign, but a recent money transfer of $198 put him above the $2,000 cap. Documents disclosing campaign contributions were not yet filed as of Friday afternoon, Oct. 30, he said.

Carlos Romero, the affordable housing consultant seeking a third term on council was not required to disclose campaign finance information because he did not plan to raise more than $2,000 in campaign contributions.

Romero said he did not want to accept donations to avoid "undue influence from donors" and decided to self-fund his campaign.

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Challenger outraises six opponents in East Palo Alto City Council race by lending money to his own campaign

Two newcomers lead way in campaign funds, but incumbent finds support solely through donations

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Fri, Oct 30, 2020, 2:37 pm

With Election Day fast approaching, Webster Lincoln, one of four newcomers vying for a seat on the East Palo Alto City Council, leads the way in campaign contributions over his six opponents, raising $18,005.69 as of Oct. 17, the latest finance disclosures show.

Documents show that $13,872.69, or more than 75% of his campaign funds, came from Lincoln's own pocket. The rest of his funds, $4,133, came from individual donations, ranging from $100 to $500.

The contributions include $500 from his mother, Niambi Lincoln, current manager at the Palo Alto Park Mutual Water Company; $500 from Katherine Loudd, Lincoln's grandmother and former manager at the water company; $500 from William Treseder, a senior vice president of product at Palo Alto tech company BMNT; and $250 from Catherine Burton, a Sequoia Union High School District teacher.

Behind Lincoln, fellow newcomer Antonio Lopez raised $16,451.79. Most of Lopez's funds came from individual donations ranging between $100 and $500. As of Oct. 17, his campaign had raised $14,540.

The 26-year-old doctoral candidate in literature at Stanford University received a substantial pool of donations from staff, faculty and colleagues from his alma maters, local schools and other educational institutions. Several contributions came from various Menlo School faculty members, including a $104 donation from Head of School Than Healy.

Documents also show contributions from donors in the publishing and writing sphere, including San Mateo County poet laureate Aileen Cassinetto, and from real estate investment firms, including Blair Volckmann, a partner at Harvest Properties, the Oakland-based developer that purchased 17 acres near Bay Road and Weeks Street last year, according to the San Francisco Business Times.

While a majority of the contributions, almost 70%, came in within a single month, from Sept. 18 to Oct. 17, the rest of the money came from Lopez, who lent his campaign $2,365.

Larry Moody, the former mayor and vice mayor who is seeking a third term on council, received support from local politicians, real estate agents and investors, tech employees and the East Palo Alto Police Officers Association, according to documents.

In total, the longtime East Palo Alto resident raised $14,755 for his campaign, solely through donations.

Contributions include $500 from San Mateo County Supervisor Warren Slocum; $500 from John Pimentel, a candidate for the San Mateo County Community College District Board of Trustees; $250 from Santa Clara County Supervisor Joe Simitian; $250 from Pat Burt, a former mayor looking to return to the Palo Alto City Council this fall; $200 from state Senate candidate Josh Becker; and $100 from Gisell Hale, a council candidate for Redwood City.

Moody also received several contributions from employees tied to the tech industry, including $200 from Juan Salazar, a public policy manager at Facebook. A few donations also came from real estate agents and investors, such as a $250 contribution from Michael Kramer, managing director of Sand Hill Property Company, which has a few investments in the city.

The campaigns of incumbent Lisa Gauthier and Juan Mendez, the youngest candidate in the race, have raised substantially less money.

Gauthier's campaign raised $4,205 through donations and loans she provided.

Contributions to the former mayor's re-election efforts include $100 to $500 donations from some of the same individuals who also supported Moody's campaign — Becker, Burt, Pimentel and Salazar.

Leigh Morgan, former chief operating officer at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, who lives in Seattle, also donated $250 to Gauthier's campaign, as well as Azalea Renfield, community services manager at the City Manager's office, who donated $500.

Documents submitted Oct. 30 show that Mendez's campaign received $2,357.63 and came primarily through two sources: a pool of smaller contributions of less than $100 — which means Mendez's campaign does not have to disclose any identifying information on those donors or the dollar amount they gave — and founding CEO of Silicon Valley Bank Roger Smith, who gave $500 to the campaign. There were a few other contributions in the $190 to $400 range, including one from former San Jose City Council candidate Jenny Higgins.

Stewart Hyland, organizing director at the Housing Leadership Council of San Mateo County, initially did not intend to raise more than $2,000 for his campaign, but a recent money transfer of $198 put him above the $2,000 cap. Documents disclosing campaign contributions were not yet filed as of Friday afternoon, Oct. 30, he said.

Carlos Romero, the affordable housing consultant seeking a third term on council was not required to disclose campaign finance information because he did not plan to raise more than $2,000 in campaign contributions.

Romero said he did not want to accept donations to avoid "undue influence from donors" and decided to self-fund his campaign.

Comments

James Brown
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on Oct 30, 2020 at 5:30 pm
James Brown, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on Oct 30, 2020 at 5:30 pm
7 people like this

[Portion removed.] He has absolutely no record in EPA, and has not shown up in City Council Meetings prior to running for office. I have grave concerns about this - nobody should be able to show up out of nowhere and buy an election with zero accomplishments or history of service in the city.


Richard Pryor
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on Oct 31, 2020 at 12:01 am
Richard Pryor, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on Oct 31, 2020 at 12:01 am
26 people like this

Wonderful Article. Hit the Nail on the Head. Its A Pity though, that there are Those that crawl out from out of the woodwork (out of nowhere) attempting to spoil the moment.
I disagree with your assumption.
There are People that are just entering into the climate of EPA (Gentrifiers) that feel that they Know about everything and everybody. Then they want to cast 'disparagements' as to One Candidates present. So How would you know Him, when you just arrived? Dictating Standards. When You weren't here? Claiming this about this Candidate I've known His Family for the last 33 years. He and his wonderful family help Co-found St. John Missionary Baptist Church on Bay Rd. in EPA. They have been Instrumental in Politics while achieving "A Higher Education".
They have attended to The Youth in the community.

Another thing. I've been around for Decades. I don't know of anyone by your name.

I am sure the above commenter is familiar with the modern equipment called the TV set. Council Meetings are Broadcast regularly and you may if you wish, return to the EPA Official cite to watch the Council Meetings at leisure. (I do it all the time). To Say that the Gentleman is attempting in Buying an Election is rude to say the least. There is NO Law against paying your OWN WAY? It is practice by Politicians at almost every Election. Including by 3 of them mentioned above. But Yet you single out someone, that it appears that you are trying to eliminate?
At Lease he hasn't taken Funds from The Busy Developers that frequently attend the Council Meetings? Unlike some of the Others. Did you read that?

So your "grave concerns" have become a Non-Factor & are Muted.


Gentle Gentrifier
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on Oct 31, 2020 at 3:10 pm
Gentle Gentrifier, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on Oct 31, 2020 at 3:10 pm
Like this comment

Ah yes, the evil gentrifier. Gentrifiers need love too. What is a gentrifier? How do you define gentrifier? 8 to 10 years ago many families lost their homes in East Palo Alto. It was a buyer's market. The amount of inventory was way up. You could download pages of MLS thumbnail pictures and descriptions of homes for sale. Some of these homes were bought by investors who bought low, fixed them up and sold them at a higher price and made a profit. Some homes were purchased or sold at auction to families who could finally buy. They had saved for a while to buy a home and now they could afford one. Some homes were bought by professional landlords who to this day own them and make a profit by renting them. A small percentage of so-called gentrifiers take a lead and get involved in the community. They appear to "Know about everything and everybody." What would you have people who want to move in and get involved and learn as much as they can about EPA do? Should they stay and home and mind their own business? They may not know everything about EPA. Perhaps you could teach them. Be kind. Are those of us who bought homes here with the simple intention of living here peacefully, getting to know neighbors and raise our families really ruining EPA? What should we have done? Move out to Fresno and buy homes? Was it illegal for me to buy a home here? Some families that moved to EPA are not going anywhere. Get to know your gentrifying neighbors and treat them with respect and stop being so divisive.


Richard Pryor
Registered user
East Palo Alto
on Nov 1, 2020 at 1:57 am
Richard Pryor, East Palo Alto
Registered user
on Nov 1, 2020 at 1:57 am
2 people like this

I Guess that you were directing your comments at Me?
Well even if not. Here I go.
You ask “What is a "Gentrifier".
Its Someone that haven't been down in the Trenches, when EPA was being Called "Murder Capitol" of The Nation. Even as early as to (less than) A year ago.
Yes A Hopeful Developer/Investor Called EPA this. That was RUDE & the Council did not approve His project. Aside from the same Developer NOT having experience.
Tell us where were Your heads are sticking out Then?
Are Developers "Gods" now? Actually the Newbies want enough of the OLD to be removed, so that they can move their Traditions and way of life & The Old are eliminated.
Thanks for bringing that Awful "Era" of Foreclosures up. It is well known that There was "Predatory Lending".
Was it “illegal” for you to compensate off of (mostly) un-knowledgeable property Owners. No. Not indirectly that is. The people moving in, were more of an Opportunist.
But that wasn't the ONLY reason Why there was a "Diaspora" of 55% of the Former population Who were Displaced. They were Systematically discriminated against. The New Landlords REFUSED to Rent to That demographic. What was/is “illegal” were for these Landlords/Investors to Systematically discriminate. Raising Rents so High. It was fruitless in staying. One Landlord stated. "We like Family's. They will pay more rent. We can't get the normal Tech person to come to live within EPA. This doesn’t include people like yourself (0bviously).
Current residents will live with 2 to 3 Families in a House to pay the rent. So as Not to move into the Central Valley."
There are NUMEROUS reasons for this displacement & why this happened. The Majority of the Landlords purchased from Certain Real Estate Agents. The Agents would seek out ONLY a certain Demographic background. Otherwise they would NOT Entertain Selling to them, nor would they Rent to Them! They made it harder.
As to the Distressed Homeowners.
They weren't told about programs that could have kept them in those homes and The Vultures didn't make them none the Wiser. Majority of those Homeowners didn't know that they could have "Sued" in keeping their Homes, because of the "Predator Laws". They still have up to 4 yrs to Act. There is Still a possibility for them in receiving a $50,000 settlement. But Not in getting Their Homes back. Why? Because of the "Innocent Act".
FYI:
I've gotten to know a number of The "Gentrifiers" that stick their Necks out rudely. They are mostly RUDE and "divisive".
You made mention of (getting) to know these “Gentrifiers”? Most of them pretend to want to get to know you. Their next Act is in finding roads in having you taken out of EPA.

They have gotten the Impression that The existing Residents don't know what they are doing. They accuse them of being corrupt. They come in like "Snobs". This is after Older residents have been here, over 40 -60yrs.
The Older population that remains in EPA. Are taken advantage of. They are told that they are in the Minority and that The Newer residents “Rule”. Because the Older Residents have welcomed them to the Table. The Gentrifiers You think of them as being "Deaf, Dumb & Gullible.

There is a Group Association that is currently operating in EPA, that is working on getting rid of what they Call the "OLD EPA" This has been written about on Social Media. We've discovered that they don't want to be "taught". They learn a few things. Then turn and use that information against them.
They are creating false rumors and causing The OLD EPA (that hold Official or good paying jobs). The Ones that are rooted inside EPA. As far back as 30-50yrs ago. When no one else would step one foot into EPA prior to work at. Now they see these jobs as "gravy" positions. Jobs that have Good Benefits. They recently received a "Living Wage". They are currently actively going after the people that hold those positions.

As usual the Original Subject was diverted.
This Article started off with One Candidate (considered a threat) was accused of “Buying the Election”? But nothing was said about any of the Other Candidates Loaning Funds to Their
Campaigns. Why is that?

The original comment post has been altered. It has been passed along onto Other Social Media venue as fact.


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