News

Newcomer Jesse Ladomirak holds fundraising lead in school board race

Challenger Katie Causey, incumbent Jennifer DiBrienza follow in second and third places

From left to right, top to bottom: Katie Causey, Todd Collins, Jennifer DiBrienza, Jesse Ladomirak, Matt Nagle and Karna Nisewaner are running for the Palo Alto school board this fall. Photos by Magali Gauthier.

Challenger Jesse Ladomirak continues to lead fundraising in the Palo Alto school board race, receiving about $7,700 during the most recent reporting period, which covers Sept. 20 through Oct. 17, according to campaign finance reports.

She is followed by challenger Katie Causey, who raised $3,928 this period, and incumbent Jennifer DiBrienza, who received $3,850 in contributions.

Incumbent and current board President Todd Collins received about $2,400 in contributions during this reporting period. His campaign has raised nearly $20,000 to date, including a $10,000 loan in August from his wife, Elisabeth Einaudi.

Challenger Karna Nisewaner raised $2,125 this period for a total to date of about $10,200. She has spent nearly all of her campaign funds, with $184 remaining.

Another challenger, Matt Nagle, is not accepting campaign contributions and is instead asking people to donate to nonprofits he is passionate about or has connections to.

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The recent contributions to Ladomirak, a district parent and co-owner of a San Francisco remodeling company, bring her campaign total to just over $28,000 to date. Donors during this reporting period included Human Relations Commissioner Steven Lee, who's running for City Council ($500); former Palo Alto High School teacher Esther Wojcicki ($250) and the Dean Democratic Club of Silicon Valley ($100).

Ladomirak spent close to $17,000 during this period, primarily on advertising, door hangers and mailers. She has about $7,500 remaining in her campaign coffers.

Causey, a district graduate and community advocate, has raised about $12,000 to date. During this most recent period she received donations from Palo Alto City Council candidate Carolyn "Cari" Templeton ($100), state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo ($150), Assemblymember Evan Low, D-Cupertino ($150) and Susan Kulawik ($1,000), a senior research scientist at the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute. Democratic Activists for Women Now, which works to elect Democratic, progressive and pro-choice women, gave $500 to Causey's campaign in late September.

Causey has just under $2,000 remaining in her campaign coffers.

DiBrienza, who is seeking a second term on the board, has raised a total of about $21,400 to date. Her donors this reporting period included district parent Sara Armstrong ($500), former school board member and Stanford Graduate School of Education faculty member Amado Padilla ($100), Palo Alto University President Maureen O'Connor ($100) and former school board member and Parents Place director Heidi Emberling ($100).

The Dean Democratic Club of Silicon Valley also supported DiBrienza with a $100 contribution and Democratic Activists for Women Now, $500.

DiBrienza spent about $3,500 this period, mostly on advertising, with about $1,700 left.

Collins, who is also seeking a second term, received contributions from entrepreneur Asher Waldfogel ($950); Preston Smith, co-founder and CEO of charter school organization Rocketship Public Schools ($50); and Barbara Klausner, former school board member and former director of nonprofit DreamCatchers ($250). Collins spent about $15,000 during this reporting period and has about $2,300 left in his campaign coffers.

The campaign for Measure O, the schools parcel tax, raised just under $34,000 during this period, with donations from school PTAs and the teachers and classified employees unions as well as a district law firm, Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo, which gave $7,500.

The Yes on O campaign has raised about $103,000 to date.

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Newcomer Jesse Ladomirak holds fundraising lead in school board race

Challenger Katie Causey, incumbent Jennifer DiBrienza follow in second and third places

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Fri, Oct 23, 2020, 9:49 am
Updated: Fri, Oct 23, 2020, 10:09 am

Challenger Jesse Ladomirak continues to lead fundraising in the Palo Alto school board race, receiving about $7,700 during the most recent reporting period, which covers Sept. 20 through Oct. 17, according to campaign finance reports.

She is followed by challenger Katie Causey, who raised $3,928 this period, and incumbent Jennifer DiBrienza, who received $3,850 in contributions.

Incumbent and current board President Todd Collins received about $2,400 in contributions during this reporting period. His campaign has raised nearly $20,000 to date, including a $10,000 loan in August from his wife, Elisabeth Einaudi.

Challenger Karna Nisewaner raised $2,125 this period for a total to date of about $10,200. She has spent nearly all of her campaign funds, with $184 remaining.

Another challenger, Matt Nagle, is not accepting campaign contributions and is instead asking people to donate to nonprofits he is passionate about or has connections to.

The recent contributions to Ladomirak, a district parent and co-owner of a San Francisco remodeling company, bring her campaign total to just over $28,000 to date. Donors during this reporting period included Human Relations Commissioner Steven Lee, who's running for City Council ($500); former Palo Alto High School teacher Esther Wojcicki ($250) and the Dean Democratic Club of Silicon Valley ($100).

Ladomirak spent close to $17,000 during this period, primarily on advertising, door hangers and mailers. She has about $7,500 remaining in her campaign coffers.

Causey, a district graduate and community advocate, has raised about $12,000 to date. During this most recent period she received donations from Palo Alto City Council candidate Carolyn "Cari" Templeton ($100), state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo ($150), Assemblymember Evan Low, D-Cupertino ($150) and Susan Kulawik ($1,000), a senior research scientist at the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute. Democratic Activists for Women Now, which works to elect Democratic, progressive and pro-choice women, gave $500 to Causey's campaign in late September.

Causey has just under $2,000 remaining in her campaign coffers.

DiBrienza, who is seeking a second term on the board, has raised a total of about $21,400 to date. Her donors this reporting period included district parent Sara Armstrong ($500), former school board member and Stanford Graduate School of Education faculty member Amado Padilla ($100), Palo Alto University President Maureen O'Connor ($100) and former school board member and Parents Place director Heidi Emberling ($100).

The Dean Democratic Club of Silicon Valley also supported DiBrienza with a $100 contribution and Democratic Activists for Women Now, $500.

DiBrienza spent about $3,500 this period, mostly on advertising, with about $1,700 left.

Collins, who is also seeking a second term, received contributions from entrepreneur Asher Waldfogel ($950); Preston Smith, co-founder and CEO of charter school organization Rocketship Public Schools ($50); and Barbara Klausner, former school board member and former director of nonprofit DreamCatchers ($250). Collins spent about $15,000 during this reporting period and has about $2,300 left in his campaign coffers.

The campaign for Measure O, the schools parcel tax, raised just under $34,000 during this period, with donations from school PTAs and the teachers and classified employees unions as well as a district law firm, Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo, which gave $7,500.

The Yes on O campaign has raised about $103,000 to date.

Comments

Want your kids back in school?
Registered user
Midtown
on Oct 23, 2020 at 11:47 am
Want your kids back in school?, Midtown
Registered user
on Oct 23, 2020 at 11:47 am
15 people like this

If you want your kids back in school, VOTE FOR Karna! VOTE FOR Jesse!

If you want your kids home doing distanced (no) learning or hybrid for the next TWO years, depressed, isolated, attempting to commit suicide, even high schoolers who previously had plans of attending college dropping out of school because they don't have enough laptops per family or good enough WiFi even if they did (all of which I personally have seen in the last week alone) then go ahead and vote for Katie or Matt. Yes, TWO MORE YEARS is how long the SCC Health Officer Cody said (in Simitians' town hall on Monday, recorded) she plans to keep up masks and distancing. And by the way, local private schools and charter schools have thousands on their waiting lists, and are no longer accepting applications. So you unless you: move out of SCC to Del Mar with other Bay Area Families flocking there (in person 5 days/week); move out of state (to any other state outside CA and the Bay Area with schools already back to classes and sports in person across the US since Labor Day); start homeschooling all your kids; or start your own Charter School .... then you're trapped. For TWO MORE YEARS OF THIS ABSURD 100% online or "hybrid" going two days per week. No joke.


Facts and Figures
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Oct 25, 2020 at 2:54 pm
Facts and Figures, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Oct 25, 2020 at 2:54 pm
7 people like this

Does anyone else not find the need for this level of contribution in a local school board race to be upsetting. In a town of about 66,000 people, these folks have raised over $90,000 for a school board race.

I would like to know how much in advertising is spent with PA Online and the print Weekly Version, as well as the Post.

We've receive emails, texts, and printed mailers.


Murphy
Registered user
Midtown
on Oct 27, 2020 at 8:14 am
Murphy, Midtown
Registered user
on Oct 27, 2020 at 8:14 am
3 people like this

@facts - agree. Ironic that candidates campaigning on equity stance don't practice it with their own school board race and run a grass roots campaign.

How much of the spend went to the Weekly or Post and influenced their backing of candidates? An earlier article that listed a candidate spending several thousand to have their candidate statement written. If they can't write their own statement are they best for the board?
Let's hope we get the right people on the board, not just the ones who can create door hangers, flyers and ads etc.


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