News

High heat, unhealthful air quality likely to last into the week

Records set throughout the Bay Area on Sunday

Record-setting heat and smoky air descended on the Bay Area on Sunday and is expected to only improve slightly over the next few days, the National Weather Service said.

Smoke concentrations were unhealthy in the Bay Area on Sunday night, Sept. 6. Courtesy U.S. Navy Monterey/NAAPS.

At least a dozen Bay Area cities recorded record-high temperatures Sunday. And though temperatures are expected to go down a bit toward the end of this coming week, that cooldown is expected to come with higher winds at inland points, especially at higher elevations, said Brayden Murdock, a National Weather Service meteorologist.

The scorching heat was coupled with increasing smoke that at times pushed air quality into the unhealthy zone. Palo Alto's temperature soared to 108 degrees and Los Altos reached 107, according to The Weather Channel app.

Murdock said Sunday's high temperatures in Napa (110 degrees), Kentfield (108) and Gilroy (112) equaled all-time high readings in those cities for September.

Other record-setting high temperatures for the Sept. 6 date were registered in Richmond at 103 degrees, breaking the Sept. 6 record of 91 degrees set in 2004; in Livermore, with 111 degrees Sunday breaking the previous record for this date of 108 set in 1904; in downtown San Francisco, where Sunday's 100 degrees broke the record for this date, which was 92 in 1904; at the SFO airport, where 102 degrees Sunday was 8 degrees hotter than the previous high of 94 degrees set in 2004; Redwood City's Sunday high of 107 degrees, besting the 1958 record for this date at 100 degrees; in downtown

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Oakland, where Sunday's 102 degrees topped the previous record for this date of 95 set in 1979; in San Jose, where Sunday's reading of 105 degrees topped this date's previous record there of 100 degrees; in Santa Cruz, where Sunday's high was 102, higher than the 98 recorded in 2004; and in Salinas, where Sunday's high of 103 was six degrees hotter than the previous high for this date, in 2004.

Low temperatures Sunday night into Monday morning were expected to range from the upper 60s closer to the ocean and bay, to the upper 70s in the more easterly inland reaches of the Bay Area, Murdock said. High temperatures on Monday are expected to be a few degrees cooler than the Bay Area's sweltering temperatures recorded Sunday.

That heat is expected to last into Wednesday or Thursday, Murdock said, when a marine layer is expected to develop, first cooling the coast areas in then moving east to inland areas. And while winds in most parts of the Bay Area were slight to nonexistent, that will change this week along with the temperatures. Especially inland, Murdock said, continued low humidity combined with stronger winds will increase fire danger.

Local air quality also reached unhealthful levels, including in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Mountain View, according to the Purple Air app.

Smoky conditions are expected to remain for at least the next few days, with wind speeds likely to remain low. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District said that, as of 7 p.m. Sunday, air quality in the South Bay and in the East Bay beyond the Caldecott Tunnel and the Dublin Hills is

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"unhealthy," with readings in the "unhealthy for sensitive groups" category in parts of the East Bay around Oakland and in the North Bay. Only in San Francisco, northern San Mateo County and in the Santa Cruz Mountains was the air considered of "moderate" quality, the air district said.

The smoke around the Bay Area, Murdock said, has been in the area for several days. It is unlikely that smoke from the Creek Fire in the Fresno area has made it to the Bay Area, and that local smoke from the various fires in the past two weeks closer to the Bay Area continues to impact the region's air quality.

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High heat, unhealthful air quality likely to last into the week

Records set throughout the Bay Area on Sunday

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Mon, Sep 7, 2020, 12:15 am

Record-setting heat and smoky air descended on the Bay Area on Sunday and is expected to only improve slightly over the next few days, the National Weather Service said.

At least a dozen Bay Area cities recorded record-high temperatures Sunday. And though temperatures are expected to go down a bit toward the end of this coming week, that cooldown is expected to come with higher winds at inland points, especially at higher elevations, said Brayden Murdock, a National Weather Service meteorologist.

The scorching heat was coupled with increasing smoke that at times pushed air quality into the unhealthy zone. Palo Alto's temperature soared to 108 degrees and Los Altos reached 107, according to The Weather Channel app.

Murdock said Sunday's high temperatures in Napa (110 degrees), Kentfield (108) and Gilroy (112) equaled all-time high readings in those cities for September.

Other record-setting high temperatures for the Sept. 6 date were registered in Richmond at 103 degrees, breaking the Sept. 6 record of 91 degrees set in 2004; in Livermore, with 111 degrees Sunday breaking the previous record for this date of 108 set in 1904; in downtown San Francisco, where Sunday's 100 degrees broke the record for this date, which was 92 in 1904; at the SFO airport, where 102 degrees Sunday was 8 degrees hotter than the previous high of 94 degrees set in 2004; Redwood City's Sunday high of 107 degrees, besting the 1958 record for this date at 100 degrees; in downtown

Oakland, where Sunday's 102 degrees topped the previous record for this date of 95 set in 1979; in San Jose, where Sunday's reading of 105 degrees topped this date's previous record there of 100 degrees; in Santa Cruz, where Sunday's high was 102, higher than the 98 recorded in 2004; and in Salinas, where Sunday's high of 103 was six degrees hotter than the previous high for this date, in 2004.

Low temperatures Sunday night into Monday morning were expected to range from the upper 60s closer to the ocean and bay, to the upper 70s in the more easterly inland reaches of the Bay Area, Murdock said. High temperatures on Monday are expected to be a few degrees cooler than the Bay Area's sweltering temperatures recorded Sunday.

That heat is expected to last into Wednesday or Thursday, Murdock said, when a marine layer is expected to develop, first cooling the coast areas in then moving east to inland areas. And while winds in most parts of the Bay Area were slight to nonexistent, that will change this week along with the temperatures. Especially inland, Murdock said, continued low humidity combined with stronger winds will increase fire danger.

Local air quality also reached unhealthful levels, including in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Mountain View, according to the Purple Air app.

Smoky conditions are expected to remain for at least the next few days, with wind speeds likely to remain low. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District said that, as of 7 p.m. Sunday, air quality in the South Bay and in the East Bay beyond the Caldecott Tunnel and the Dublin Hills is

"unhealthy," with readings in the "unhealthy for sensitive groups" category in parts of the East Bay around Oakland and in the North Bay. Only in San Francisco, northern San Mateo County and in the Santa Cruz Mountains was the air considered of "moderate" quality, the air district said.

The smoke around the Bay Area, Murdock said, has been in the area for several days. It is unlikely that smoke from the Creek Fire in the Fresno area has made it to the Bay Area, and that local smoke from the various fires in the past two weeks closer to the Bay Area continues to impact the region's air quality.

Comments

Paly Teacher
Registered user
Palo Alto High School
on Sep 7, 2020 at 6:23 pm
Paly Teacher, Palo Alto High School
Registered user
on Sep 7, 2020 at 6:23 pm
7 people like this

For those curious as to why we shouldn't hold classes outdoors, here's a huge one. Imagine having your child sitting in the sweltering heat and unhealthy air. And one major reason we can't just switch back and forth between outdoor and online learning is lessons for each setting are totally different and teachers don't have unlimited time to plan for both.


Excuses
Registered user
Fairmeadow
on Sep 7, 2020 at 9:27 pm
Excuses, Fairmeadow
Registered user
on Sep 7, 2020 at 9:27 pm
6 people like this

I am getting a little tired of hearing your endless list of reasons why more can't be done for district families. My mother is a teacher. She is outraged by what is happening in PAUSD because she sees the damage that distance learning is doing to kids and parents. She believes the district can and should be doing better by district families.

My kids are not only socially isolated (and have been so for months), sick of their parents, and spending far too much time on screens because it is the only way to reach out to friends. They have also developed back pain from sitting so much and one of them now has wrist issues. Kids with grownup office problems. Others have developed anxiety or depression, and are starting to act out. Parents are at wits' end, which does nothing to help the kids.

This distance learning is damaging for kids. What will it take for the district to acknowledge that and consider the fact that the possibility of occasional smoky or warm days should not in and of itself preclude outdoor classes? Instead of excuses I would like to hear ideas.

This is the first year that I haven't donated to PIE, and I usually give generously. The spring was handled poorly and Austin never acknowledged it. This persistent demurral does nothing to inspire my generosity either. The district has some fantastic teachers. But much of the good will between teachers and district families has been lost, and I'd suggest you not take that lightly.


Facts and Figures
Registered user
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 8, 2020 at 6:50 am
Facts and Figures, Duveneck/St. Francis
Registered user
on Sep 8, 2020 at 6:50 am
Like this comment

@Excuses,

We are 2 years away from the next school Board election, but consider building your army and running.

Note that PAUSD has not announced any Covid-19 physical improvements to sites (e.g., filtration, UV lighting, Internet wiring).

How are we going back to school?


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