News

Palo Alto leaders condemn police brutality, vow to protect demonstrators

Police chief: Officers are committed to providing 'safe space' for peaceful protesters

Demonstrators left posters protesting racial injustice and the killing of George Floyd in front of Palo Alto City Hall on June 1. Photo by Gennady Sheyner.

Responding to waves of protests against police brutality that have swept the nation and arrived at their doorstep on Monday, Palo Alto's city leaders publicly condemned the killing of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody and offered their support to peaceful demonstrators.

Hours after protesters staged peaceful demonstrations in Menlo Park and Palo Alto, the city's mayor, city manager and police chief all expressed support for those fighting for racial equality. City Manager Ed Shikada and Police Chief Robert Jonsen issued a joint statement with Pastor Paul Bains of Saint Samuel Church in East Palo Alto (who serves as Palo Alto police chaplain) and the Rev. Kaloma Smith, chairman of the city's Human Relations Commission and pastor of the University AME Zion Church in Palo Alto.

Peaceful events like those that took place in the city, they wrote, and their necessary calls for change, "should outshine the acts of violence taking place in several communities," the statement reads.

"We condemn the actions and inaction of the police officers in Minnesota and we do not tolerate or condone this type of behavior in Palo Alto at any level," Shikada, Jonsen, Bains and Smith wrote. "Their actions have had a tremendous impact on all police officers serving communities like Palo Alto all across our great nation."

The Monday actions followed a period in which the city has been facing its own questions about police brutality and transparency.

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In December, the City Council voted unanimously to revise the agreement with the city's independent police auditor to specifically exclude internal personnel matters from the auditor's purview. The action followed media reports about a high-level officer using a racist slur against another officer, who is black.

A month prior to that action, the council approved a $572,500 settlement with a resident of the Buena Vista Mobile Home Park who was forcefully arrested in front of his home and mocked by the supervising officer. Days after that settlement, the city was hit with a claim for a July 2019 incident in which a man was taken down and arrested in front of Happy Donuts – an altercation that had left him with a concussion and a broken orbital bone. The claim is seeking $3.85 million in damages from the city.

The joint statement alluded to those incidents and said that no police department is "immune from public scrutiny, nor should it be."

"Even here in Palo Alto, the actions of a few officers in the past may have caused our community to question their commitment to the law and policy," the statement read. "However, through mutual respect, trust and a deep regard for the Constitutional rights of all, we remain more steadfast today than ever to continue to support our community through these uncertain times."

Barron Park resident Winter Dellenbach asked the council during its meeting Monday to take more substantive action and to change its approach for addressing incidents involving police use of force.

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"We all know that many other cities have problems with police abuse and brutality but our city does too," Dellenbach said. "It happens in our city. It's a systemic problem. It was created and nourished by racism and it still is. And you know that."

She asked the council to prioritize individuals that make credible brutality claim over denying these claims "at all costs." The city, she said, seems to go into a "protective crouch, which sends a really bad message." She also said the city should be more active in demanding regular auditor reports, which have traditionally been issued twice a year (the last report, which was issued in March, was the first audit since October 2018).

"That's the way to honor the death of this man – by actually taking action and to make a statement that we're a zero-tolerance city for police abuse and brutality for any reason against anyone, because there's no excuse for it," Dellenbach said.

Speaking during the meeting, Jonsen called George Floyd's death "a tragedy that shouldn't have happened" and tied it to the nation's broader racial disparities.

"Our country is failing to address the core systemic problems that we've been facing for years," Jonsen said. "We have made such little progress as a country in correcting the many of the racial and socioeconomic disparities that contribute to the divisive breaks in the community that we're seeing now."

As a police chief, he said, he is also saddened and deeply concerned about the "welfare of the thousands of men and women in the law enforcement profession who have always served this community with professionalism and respect and are being violently attacked defending lawful protesters and property of others, while also trying to maintain the peace throughout our country."

Jonsen expressed appreciation for the peaceful demonstrators, whom he called "a great example for others to follow." The department, he said, is committed to protecting all people who are exercising their right to peacefully demonstrate. He also said the department will "hold personnel accountable when necessary" and provide transparency to enhance public trust.

Several council members also said Monday they were horrified by the video of Floyd's killing, which Councilman Eric Filseth called "appalling" and Vice Mayor Tom DuBois described it as "deeply horrifying." Mayor Adrian Fine said the city will "continue to hold its officers to the highest standards, and insist that all people be treated with the dignity and respect that each of us deserves."

"We cannot ignore that blacks and people of color in America suffer prejudice and inequality," Fine said. "Black communities and families are less well off. Black lives are not valued equally in this country and it's a stain on our nation's soul."

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Palo Alto leaders condemn police brutality, vow to protect demonstrators

Police chief: Officers are committed to providing 'safe space' for peaceful protesters

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Tue, Jun 2, 2020, 12:15 am

Responding to waves of protests against police brutality that have swept the nation and arrived at their doorstep on Monday, Palo Alto's city leaders publicly condemned the killing of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody and offered their support to peaceful demonstrators.

Hours after protesters staged peaceful demonstrations in Menlo Park and Palo Alto, the city's mayor, city manager and police chief all expressed support for those fighting for racial equality. City Manager Ed Shikada and Police Chief Robert Jonsen issued a joint statement with Pastor Paul Bains of Saint Samuel Church in East Palo Alto (who serves as Palo Alto police chaplain) and the Rev. Kaloma Smith, chairman of the city's Human Relations Commission and pastor of the University AME Zion Church in Palo Alto.

Peaceful events like those that took place in the city, they wrote, and their necessary calls for change, "should outshine the acts of violence taking place in several communities," the statement reads.

"We condemn the actions and inaction of the police officers in Minnesota and we do not tolerate or condone this type of behavior in Palo Alto at any level," Shikada, Jonsen, Bains and Smith wrote. "Their actions have had a tremendous impact on all police officers serving communities like Palo Alto all across our great nation."

The Monday actions followed a period in which the city has been facing its own questions about police brutality and transparency.

In December, the City Council voted unanimously to revise the agreement with the city's independent police auditor to specifically exclude internal personnel matters from the auditor's purview. The action followed media reports about a high-level officer using a racist slur against another officer, who is black.

A month prior to that action, the council approved a $572,500 settlement with a resident of the Buena Vista Mobile Home Park who was forcefully arrested in front of his home and mocked by the supervising officer. Days after that settlement, the city was hit with a claim for a July 2019 incident in which a man was taken down and arrested in front of Happy Donuts – an altercation that had left him with a concussion and a broken orbital bone. The claim is seeking $3.85 million in damages from the city.

The joint statement alluded to those incidents and said that no police department is "immune from public scrutiny, nor should it be."

"Even here in Palo Alto, the actions of a few officers in the past may have caused our community to question their commitment to the law and policy," the statement read. "However, through mutual respect, trust and a deep regard for the Constitutional rights of all, we remain more steadfast today than ever to continue to support our community through these uncertain times."

Barron Park resident Winter Dellenbach asked the council during its meeting Monday to take more substantive action and to change its approach for addressing incidents involving police use of force.

"We all know that many other cities have problems with police abuse and brutality but our city does too," Dellenbach said. "It happens in our city. It's a systemic problem. It was created and nourished by racism and it still is. And you know that."

She asked the council to prioritize individuals that make credible brutality claim over denying these claims "at all costs." The city, she said, seems to go into a "protective crouch, which sends a really bad message." She also said the city should be more active in demanding regular auditor reports, which have traditionally been issued twice a year (the last report, which was issued in March, was the first audit since October 2018).

"That's the way to honor the death of this man – by actually taking action and to make a statement that we're a zero-tolerance city for police abuse and brutality for any reason against anyone, because there's no excuse for it," Dellenbach said.

Speaking during the meeting, Jonsen called George Floyd's death "a tragedy that shouldn't have happened" and tied it to the nation's broader racial disparities.

"Our country is failing to address the core systemic problems that we've been facing for years," Jonsen said. "We have made such little progress as a country in correcting the many of the racial and socioeconomic disparities that contribute to the divisive breaks in the community that we're seeing now."

As a police chief, he said, he is also saddened and deeply concerned about the "welfare of the thousands of men and women in the law enforcement profession who have always served this community with professionalism and respect and are being violently attacked defending lawful protesters and property of others, while also trying to maintain the peace throughout our country."

Jonsen expressed appreciation for the peaceful demonstrators, whom he called "a great example for others to follow." The department, he said, is committed to protecting all people who are exercising their right to peacefully demonstrate. He also said the department will "hold personnel accountable when necessary" and provide transparency to enhance public trust.

Several council members also said Monday they were horrified by the video of Floyd's killing, which Councilman Eric Filseth called "appalling" and Vice Mayor Tom DuBois described it as "deeply horrifying." Mayor Adrian Fine said the city will "continue to hold its officers to the highest standards, and insist that all people be treated with the dignity and respect that each of us deserves."

"We cannot ignore that blacks and people of color in America suffer prejudice and inequality," Fine said. "Black communities and families are less well off. Black lives are not valued equally in this country and it's a stain on our nation's soul."

Comments

What Will They Do Next
Old Palo Alto
on Jun 2, 2020 at 11:01 am
What Will They Do Next, Old Palo Alto
on Jun 2, 2020 at 11:01 am
46 people like this

Did I miss the part where our revered leaders criticized the rioters and looters?


Dan
Professorville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 11:10 am
Dan, Professorville
on Jun 2, 2020 at 11:10 am
34 people like this

Thank you to the Palo Alto Police for the incredible and professional job you do keeping us safe. I cannot imagine how hard it is to be a police officer right now.


ReallyLiveHere
Fairmeadow
on Jun 2, 2020 at 11:30 am
ReallyLiveHere, Fairmeadow
on Jun 2, 2020 at 11:30 am
8 people like this

There's a long history of racism by the PAPD - and the only change I've really seen in recent years is that they ceased collected data about the race during traffic stops. We need actions here, not just words.

How about:
* Ending the harassment of nonwhites in our town, and collecting data to show that it has really ended
* Leaving their pistols in a locker in the back of the cruiser instead of carrying them around all the time
* Reducing the number of police; we mostly need firefighters and EMTs anyways
* having somebody other than the DA's office be responsible for prosecuting cops (the DA depends on police goodwill to for career advancement)
* Destroying military equipment in police possession
* Ensure a medical response to mental health emergencies, rather than a police one


Annette
Barron Park
on Jun 2, 2020 at 12:13 pm
Annette, Barron Park
on Jun 2, 2020 at 12:13 pm
11 people like this

And it only took City of PA PD 168 hours to condemn the murder of George Floyd. Meanwhile PAPD was tweeting about Foodie Friday and where to park your car when taking a hike, and Chief Jonsen was tweeting about "wise insights from others can help us move forward together"...never actually condemning the murder by another cop. #fakesincerity #platitudes

The joint statement ..."Our City has a long proud history of supporting all kinds of demonstrations and allowing people to legally and safely assemble..." Aren't we glad the City of Palo Alto is "allowing' us to exercise our First Amendment rights of the U.S. Constitution?

Transparency- the level of b.s. and lip service is transparent, for sure.


Member
Barron Park
on Jun 2, 2020 at 12:16 pm
Member, Barron Park
on Jun 2, 2020 at 12:16 pm
29 people like this

So who's going to protect the police officers? Looters can do whatever they want with little consequence, but the officers, who are outnumbered, have to protect the public while holding back, always worried that they will get in trouble. How are police supposed to do their job?


Annette
Barron Park
on Jun 2, 2020 at 12:17 pm
Annette, Barron Park
on Jun 2, 2020 at 12:17 pm
8 people like this

Web Link

No More Money for the Police
Redirect it to emergency response programs that don’t kill black people.

By Philip V. McHarris and Thenjiwe McHarris
Mr. McHarris is a doctoral candidate focusing on race, housing and policing. Ms. McHarris is a strategist with the Movement for Black Lives.

May 30, 2020


Municipalities could change policies so social service workers, not the police, are dispatched for certain kinds of 911 calls. Credit...Michael Appleton for The New York Times
The only way we’re going to stop these endless cycles of police violence is by creating alternatives to policing. Because even in a pandemic where black people have been disproportionately killed by the coronavirus, the police are still murdering us.

On Monday, a worker at a store in Minneapolis called 911, claiming that George Floyd had used counterfeit money. The incident ended with a police officer suffocating Mr. Floyd to death, despite his and bystanders’ pleas for mercy. Protests have since erupted across the country while the police respond with military-style violence.

As the case of George Floyd makes clear, calling 911 for even the slightest thing can be a death sentence for black people. For many marginalized communities, 911 is not a viable option because the police often make crises worse. These same communities, who often need emergency services the most, are forced to make do without the help.

More training or diversity among police officers won’t end police brutality, nor will firing and charging individual officers. Look at the Minneapolis Police Department, which is held up as a model of progressive police reform. The department offers procedural justice as well as trainings for implicit bias, mindfulness and de-escalation. It embraces community policing and officer diversity, bans “warrior style” policing, uses body cameras, implemented an early intervention system to identify problematic officers, receives training around mental health crisis intervention, and practices “reconciliation” efforts in communities of color.


George Floyd was still murdered. The focus on training, diversity and technology like body cameras shifts focus away from the root cause of police violence and instead gives the police more power and resources. The problem is that the entire criminal justice system gives police officers the power and opportunity to systematically harass and kill with impunity.

The solution to ending police violence and cultivating a safer country lies in reducing the power of the police and their contact with the public. We can do that by reinvesting the $100 billion spent on policing nationwide in alternative emergency response programs, as protesters in Minneapolis have called for. City, state and federal grants can also fund these programs.

Municipalities can begin by changing policies or statutes so police officers never respond to certain kinds of emergencies, including ones that involve substance abuse, domestic violence, homelessness or mental health. Instead, health care workers or emergency response teams would handle these incidents. So if someone calls 911 to report a drug overdose, health care teams rush to the scene; the police wouldn’t get involved. If a person calls 911 to complain about people who are homeless, rapid response social workers would provide them with housing support and other resources. Conflict interrupters and restorative justice teams could mediate situations where no one’s safety is being threatened. Community organizers, rather than police officers, would help manage responses to the pandemic. Ideally, people would have the option to call a different number — say 727 — to access various trained response teams.

The good news is, this is already happening. Violence interruption programs exist throughout the country and they’re often led by people from the community who have experience navigating tricky situations. Some programs, like one in Washington, D.C., do not work with the police; its staff members rely instead on personal outreach and social connections for information about violence that they work to mediate and diffuse. We should invest in these programs, which operate on shoestring budgets, so they have their own dedicated dispatch centers outside of 911.

Dallas is pioneering a new approach where social workers are being dispatched to some 911 calls that involve mental health emergencies. The program has shown success, and many of the people receive care that they would never have gotten in jails or overcrowded hospitals.

In California, the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective deals with child sexual abuse without the police. The collective develops pods — groups of people including survivors, bystanders or people who have harmed in the past — that each pod-member feels they can turn to for support when needed.

Here’s another idea: Imagine if the money used to pay the salaries of police officers who endlessly patrol public housing buildings and harass residents can be used to fund plans that residents design to keep themselves safe. The money could also pay the salaries of maintenance and custodial workers; fund community programs, employment and a universal basic income; or pay for upgrades to elevators and apartment units so residents are not stuck without gas during a pandemic, as some people in Brooklyn were. The Movement for Black Lives and other social movements call for this kind of redirection of funds.

We need to reimagine public safety in ways that shrink and eventually abolish police and prisons while prioritizing education, housing, economic security, mental health and alternatives to conflict and violence. People often question the practicality of any emergency response that excludes the police. We live in a violent society, but the police rarely guarantee safety. Now more than ever is the time to divest not only from police resources, but also the idea that the police keep us safe.


Resident
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 2, 2020 at 12:56 pm
Resident, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 2, 2020 at 12:56 pm
26 people like this

Where was the protection for protestors of SIP a few weeks ago? When people of all backgrounds were protesting that they were unable to work, unable to open their businesses, unable to earn money to feed their families?

Why were those protests scorned? Why were those protestors judged as being dangerous for breaking the SIP, for not social distancing, for not wearing masks? Was their cause any less valid? Were there not African Americans in that crowd of protestors who wanted to get back to work? Was their cause not just enough?


Actions not Words
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 2, 2020 at 2:47 pm
Actions not Words, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 2, 2020 at 2:47 pm
10 people like this

Police Chief Jonsen's actions do not sync with his words even in this article.

Above, he says the department will hold personnel accountable when necessary' and provide transparency to enhance public trust. Neither is true.

The article states, "In December, the City Council voted unanimously to revise the agreement with the city's independent police auditor to specifically exclude internal personnel matters from the auditor's purview".

Council’s action was supported by Chief Jonsen and City Manager Shikada who were there speaking about it. The result is less transparency and accountability to the City Council, residents and the press.

In the beating that resulted in no charges but us paying a $572,500 settlement, the PAPD Sargent involved was allowed to resign with full retirement – over $10,000 per month. The Happy Donuts claim is pending, with the veteran PAPD Agent still working despite of his record of brutality.

The personnel accountability and transparency that Chief Jonsen speaks of is just words. The public trust will only be earned with actions.



Actions not Words
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 2, 2020 at 2:50 pm
Actions not Words, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 2, 2020 at 2:50 pm
5 people like this

Police Chief Jonsen's actions do not sync with his words even in this article.

Above, he says the department will hold personnel accountable when necessary' and provide transparency to enhance public trust. Neither is true.

The article states, "In December, the City Council voted unanimously to revise the agreement with the city's independent police auditor to specifically exclude internal personnel matters from the auditor's purview".

Council’s action was supported by Chief Jonsen and City Manager Shikada who were there speaking about it. The result is less transparency and accountability to the City Council, residents and the press.

In the beating that resulted in no charges but us paying a $572,500 settlement, the PAPD Sergeant involved was allowed to resign with full retirement – over $10,000 per month. The Happy Donuts claim is pending, with the veteran PAPD Agent still working despite of his record of brutality.

The personnel accountability and transparency that Chief Jonsen speaks of is just words. The public trust will only be earned with actions.



got all the story?
Barron Park
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:08 pm
got all the story?, Barron Park
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:08 pm
22 people like this

So after 2 months of SIP to flatten curve and berating and shaming us to keep social distance which led to the closing of businesses, churches , restaurants , lost jobs all of a sudden we have our city officials supporting these mass protests which are clearly against SCC guidelines of large gatherings. Unbelievable hypocrisy!!


Resident
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:14 pm
Resident, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:14 pm
5 people like this

The protestors have made their point. They have won. We are all treated the same. We are all under curfew for the next 10 days.


Online Name
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:21 pm
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:21 pm
6 people like this

Will the police be paid overtime for the 10-day curfew?


Online Name
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:35 pm
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:35 pm
7 people like this

Why does Palo Alto have a 10-day curfew but San Mateo County only has a 2-day curfew???


Mark Weiss
Downtown North
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:40 pm
Mark Weiss, Downtown North
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:40 pm
Like this comment

It makes me a little uncomfortable that i
in a somewhat unprecedented crisis and Ed Shikada, Ed Jonson and Kaloma Smith Are all relatively new to Palo alto compared to Jim Keene Dennis Burns and I guess a leadership vacuum in the black community.
There were some amazing young student leaders at Stanford who marched to City Hall at the inception of black lives matter.
I think a curfew is a good idea.


Mark Weiss
Downtown North
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:42 pm
Mark Weiss, Downtown North
on Jun 2, 2020 at 4:42 pm
Like this comment

Chief Robert Jonsen


Mark Weiss
Downtown North
on Jun 2, 2020 at 7:42 pm
Mark Weiss, Downtown North
on Jun 2, 2020 at 7:42 pm
Like this comment

Addending my previous thought: I have read the “message of hope” issued by four local leaders and would conclude that none of those people rose to their current level of responsibility by having facility with the English language.
I support the curfew, but I’d feel better if leadership could think clearly or demonstrate such.
so on one hand people are trying to communicate with platitudes on cardboard squares; then you have government Gobley book by committee; Unofficially we have these message boards.
God, In the event of in these uncertain times and not withstanding our sympathy for her actions or inactions here or there you exist, save us.


Shocked member
Los Altos Hills
on Jun 2, 2020 at 9:22 pm
Shocked member, Los Altos Hills
on Jun 2, 2020 at 9:22 pm
8 people like this

Amazed by the brazen privilege and lack of empathy towards black people being shown here. Embarrassed to call most of you my neighbors. Sad day here.


Resident
Downtown North
on Jun 3, 2020 at 7:51 am
Resident, Downtown North
on Jun 3, 2020 at 7:51 am
4 people like this

So PAPD & Chief Jonson supports the protestors and "vows to protect protestors" but then institutes an 8:30 pm curfew for 10 days?

Actions do not line up. Do PAPD also have the nice city workers perk of 80/9 plan where they work 80 hours over 9 days and get every other Friday off? Is that why we see some crazy over time pay in the public records of PAPD Staff? Some have put in overtime pay of greater than $100,000 per year. How does that work?

Does the 80/9 plan actually lead to crazy over time pay we see PAPD billing the tax payer?

So while we all cower in our homes for 10 days starting at 8:30 pm (all 66,000 residents of Palo Alto), our neighbors in Los Altos have no curfew except one at 11pm for loitering juveniles. Starting tomorrow Menlo Park, Atherton and Redwood City have no curfew.


Jennifer
another community
on Jun 3, 2020 at 9:23 am
Jennifer, another community
on Jun 3, 2020 at 9:23 am
12 people like this

Are the people who are making excuses for the rioters and looters willing to pitch in financially and help pay for all the destruction?


Online Name
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 3, 2020 at 10:20 am
Online Name, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 3, 2020 at 10:20 am
7 people like this

We've been paying for all the organized robberies at Stanford Shopping Center and other retailers in the terms of markups for years. How many times do thieves have to drive their vehicles through the glass entries at Stanford before the stores institute better security?


Mark Weiss
Downtown North
on Jun 3, 2020 at 7:53 pm
Mark Weiss, Downtown North
on Jun 3, 2020 at 7:53 pm
Like this comment

@Shocked in LAH-
As a Palo Altan who also lived half my life in LAH, your town, I am shocked that a private school rents at a sweetheart rate land that belongs to the people of Palo Alto and PAUSD -- maybe we should evict that school and put in more housing, including some BMR or for working class local teachers, police and artists.
I used to say that attending PAUSD schools -- Fremont Hills, Terman, Gunn -was one of the greatest "privileges" of my life but that word took on a weird connotation and now I call it a blessing.
It's not what you are born into its what you learn along the way. It works both ways or in all directions.
I'm for a curfew. I'm for BLM, to a point. I respect our Police. I want justice for Mr. Floyd.
I'd respect you more if you signed your real name.


Mark Weiss
Downtown North
on Jun 3, 2020 at 7:54 pm
Mark Weiss, Downtown North
on Jun 3, 2020 at 7:54 pm
2 people like this

What I meant to post here is that in reference to my comment 12 hours ago about the words leaders use, I am writing back with glad tidings that General James Mattis sometimes of Stanford Hoover Institute published a courageous statement about military honor and the lack of leadership in our country.
Web Link


common sense
Midtown
on Jun 3, 2020 at 10:31 pm
common sense, Midtown
on Jun 3, 2020 at 10:31 pm
3 people like this

Our civic leaders are running a big science experiment. They were telling us with COVID-19 not to gather in groups, keep social distancing, shelter in place, etc. Parking lots to parks were closed. Fines were threatened.

Now they are encourage assembly of people to protest. Masses of people standing shoulder to shoulder.

If we don't see an increase of COVID 19, increase in hospitalizations, we will know the shelter in place restrictions, the closing of businesses was all a bunch of baloney.

If we do see an increase of COVID 19, increase in hospitalizations, we know our leaders are political hacks who were not willing to stand up to the mob to safeguard public health.


Brian
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 4, 2020 at 9:07 am
Brian, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 4, 2020 at 9:07 am
3 people like this

So is the lockdown over? Can businesses reopen?


Resident
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 4, 2020 at 11:25 am
Resident, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 4, 2020 at 11:25 am
2 people like this

The hypocrisy being displayed is apparent.

It is ok to flout social distancing to protest, block highways, make speeches, hug each other, kneel together, and more than OK it is being encouraged.

However, it is not ok to go to church, meet a friend for lunch or dinner, have a picnic in the park, invite friends over for a backyard cookout, or go to go on a date because we are sheltering in place.


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