News

Teens accused of robbing Palo Alto woman tracked down in San Jose

Arrests come about a day after boys allegedly broke into her Midtown home

Two teenage boys accused of robbing a woman in her Midtown Palo Alto home on Tuesday afternoon and last seen fleeing in her vehicle were arrested in San Jose, where one of them allegedly burglarized another home moments before he was placed in custody, police said Wednesday.

The teens, 15 and 17, are believed to be the two individuals who carried out the home invasion robbery in the 900 block of Colorado Avenue near Louis Road around 12:45 p.m. Tuesday, police said in a press release. The teens allegedly kicked in a side door, entered the house, confronted a woman in her 70s, and demanded her personal property, including the jewelry she was wearing and money.

Police say the duo then went to the garage and stole her white 2004 four-door Honda Civic, driving away east on Colorado Avenue. The woman did not see them with weapons and wasn't physically harmed or threatened.

A witness saw a boy who appeared to be one of the robbers, based on descriptions provided by police, sitting in a car while another boy walked door to door before the robbery, according to the press release.

A second witness reported seeing a silver 2002 Toyota Camry speeding from the scene. Investigators later determined the Toyota was stolen from San Jose and was the same vehicle used in a case involving a home burglary and assault with a deadly weapon on a peace officer in San Jose, police said.

Santa Clara County's Regional Auto Theft Task Force found the Toyota in San Jose and also located one of the teens, who had the keys to the Palo Alto woman's Honda, police said. Officers have yet to locate her car with California license plate No. 5JUD666.

San Jose police officers found the other teen in the city moments after he allegedly burglarized a home, according to the press release.

The 15-year-old, who is on probation out of San Jose, was arrested for alleged vehicle theft, burglary, attempted carjacking, attempted robbery, assault and battery and possession of burglary tools, police said.

The 17-year-old was arrested for alleged burglary, attempted carjacking, attempted robbery, robbery, vehicle theft and tampering with a vehicle. The older teen is also facing potential charges in San Jose for residential burglary, resisting arrest and battery on an officer.

The boys have not been identified by police because they are underage.

Anyone with information about Tuesday's home-invasion robbery is asked to call the Palo Alto Police Department's 24-hour dispatch center at 650-329-2413. Anonymous tips can be emailed to paloalto@tipnow.org or sent by text message or voicemail to 650-383-8984. Tips can also be submitted anonymously through the police's free mobile app, downloadable at bit.ly/PAPD-AppStore or bit.ly/PAPD-GooglePlay.

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Comments

45 people like this
Posted by Downfall
a resident of Fairmeadow
on May 22, 2019 at 9:40 pm

So tired of underage criminals having their privacy protected. These were very adult crimes the 2 suspects are accused of. If they are found guilty I hope they are locked up for a long time. Take away their remaining youth and maybe they will develop some perspective.


12 people like this
Posted by George
a resident of Midtown
on May 22, 2019 at 10:08 pm

These guys are probably working for a gang - their youth and the fact that they no longer had the stolen car point to that. I hope the police can find out who they're working for and try to put some of those people out of action too.


20 people like this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on May 22, 2019 at 10:36 pm

The way I read the PAPD press release, the list of criminal charges in this article was for _previous_ arrests, not the current arrest. They hand out probation like candy. Trick or treat.


28 people like this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on May 23, 2019 at 12:29 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

So people are put on probation, let loose, then proceed to create more crime. We need a follow-up on this case. Age 15 and 17 not living with family? Doesn't sound like it. [Portion removed.] I personally feel a lot of concern since this is a local person and house being invaded. Now I am looking at my house for security and am going to be looking at people who park on the street. Glad they were caught but the fact that this happened is very disturbing. Middle of the day? We all need to know how this is resolved. We cannot let this get swept away because they are " underage". That is an excuse.


5 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 23, 2019 at 8:51 am

The fact that a 15 year old and a 17 year old did this is making this much harder for me to come to grips with.

I am so pleased that the police caught them, but if they just get another slap on the wrist it will do nothing to prevent them from becoming hardened criminals. This crime is horrific in itself, but children with rap sheets doing this makes it even more horrific to me. As a society we have to do more to prevent young people turning to crime. Whether it is drugs, gangs, lack of parental mentoring, illegal immigration, or whatever, we must be asking ourselves what can be done. When mothers have to work and leave their teens unattended and when fathers are not in the picture for whatever reason, we have to see that the breakdown of family is a factor in young lives.

I hope the victim is coping well as she recovers. This will not be easy for her, I'm sure.


14 people like this
Posted by low hanging fruit
a resident of The Greenhouse
on May 23, 2019 at 9:17 am

I thought it was all Dole's fault?


12 people like this
Posted by Bananas & Not Oil Drive The Economy
a resident of Barron Park
on May 23, 2019 at 9:43 am

> I thought it was all Dole's fault?

Nah. Ms. Chiquita Banana just had some bad apples.


15 people like this
Posted by Bananas & Not Oil Drive The Economy
a resident of Barron Park
on May 23, 2019 at 9:49 am

> As a society we have to do more to prevent young people turning to crime. Whether it is drugs, gangs, lack of parental mentoring, illegal immigration, or whatever, we must be asking ourselves what can be done.

With proper mentoring, some can be drawn away from a life of criminal activity. And you usually have to start EARLY in their lives.

Others are a lost cause due to peer pressure and/or a lack of personal direction. Repeat & multiple offenders in this category (regardless of their age) probably need to be locked up indefinitely. Or deported if not US citizens.


Like this comment
Posted by low hanging fruit
a resident of The Greenhouse
on May 23, 2019 at 9:53 am

"Ms. Chiquita Banana"

Perhaps I'm just too old, but I think the correct reference would be: Carmen Miranda

Web Link

I'm guessing Dik Browne was heavily influenced by Ms. Miranda. And the whole global fruit cabal taking-over-the-world thing, of course. Maybe Dik knew *something*.


3 people like this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on May 23, 2019 at 10:01 am

The word "allegedly" is so abused it has become synonymous with "they did it."


10 people like this
Posted by Bananas & Not Oil Drive The Economy
a resident of Barron Park
on May 23, 2019 at 10:22 am

> And the whole global fruit cabal taking-over-the-world thing,

When a banana replaces the Freemason symbol on the back of a US one dollar bill, then there might be some cause for concern.

In the meantime, Ms. Chiquita sends her regards & says don't blame the immigration or world economic problems on her. She's just a simple banana with no intentions of worldly domination. It's the apples and oranges to be wary of.


10 people like this
Posted by See-sth-say-sth
a resident of College Terrace
on May 23, 2019 at 11:08 am

Folks, please google Palo Alto robbery to see how frequently crimes happened in Palo Alto.
When only 7% disadvantage minorities pass the loose state tests, what can you expect for our youth? When all routes for upward mobility are shut off from them, as a society we must share all the costs of poor education.
Then people will say the usual things: school underfunding, teachers' low salary, harsh family and neighborhood conditions...
However, none of these factors are more devastating than the educational establishments--notably several renowned professors at Stanford's school of education--who have been dumbing down American kids with their deceitful doctrines and deficient textbooks. They have led astray American public education for decades. Hence you see the dismal academic performance in California.
But few people would want to look into this root cause to America's many acute and chronic problems. Therefore, we all will just wait to see more crimes to come and less hope for everyone's American dream.


Like this comment
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on May 23, 2019 at 11:09 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

Ms. Chiquita used to be farmed in Guatemala and Honduras. However banana world is fraught with political and agricultural problems and is now farmed in Mexico. Another brand is farmed in Ecuador. So that means that the heritage banana corporations are now having to shift their crop development to other locations within the hemispheric growing region in the world. Philippines are also a growing region - they used to import Philippine labor on the Pacific side of the growing region. So that means that the country resources previously available are now no longer there. Oh Dear - what to do with the citizens of those countries that depended on some type of job relative to the agricultural growing companies. Guess the only answer is to herd them north into the USA and let the taxpayers deal with it. After all - the companies need to shield their profit from any residual clean-up of property which is no longer healthy for growing.

Prior reference to the book "Hawaii" - James Michner, master story teller and creator of many movies. Pineapple world in Hawaii had problems due to fruit leaching nutrients out of soil. They all had to figure out the problem and how to solve it. And yes - Dole was one of the original developers in Hawaii - included sugar cane.


5 people like this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on May 23, 2019 at 11:17 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

What you see coming out of the Central American countries is an age group of young men who would constitute the main work force to keep the whole place working. That is a fact that needs to be explored. That leaves the old people and women to fend for themselves. That is a unique problem in itself. It should concern everyone that the deterioration in those countries is so blatant.


5 people like this
Posted by Anneke
a resident of Professorville
on May 23, 2019 at 11:34 am

I always have a feeling of sadness when I read about underaged people committing adult crimes. How did they become this way? What caused them to adopt a life of crime at such a young age?

We need to invest in our children, no matter where they come from. They were born as innocent babies. Investing in the youth of our world, will pay off tremendously. Education is one of the keys to opening the door of having a good life. Good youth programs to help the ones that wander is another support mechanism.


2 people like this
Posted by From Atop Carmen Miranda's Headdress
a resident of Community Center
on May 23, 2019 at 12:57 pm

> ...what to do with the citizens of those countries that depended on some type of job relative to the agricultural growing companies.

Answer: Retrain them for other viable occupations (i.e. construction trades or programming software etc.). Nobody wants to work on a banana plantation forever (unless they have absolutely no ambition or educational background).

The Cavandish Banana is on its way out due to pestilence. That's why the industry is shifting to other areas. It is not a conspiracy founded on financial collusion. As heartier banana breeds are developed, perhaps the new banana can be introduced into the 'former' banana republics.

Until then, it is the sole responsibility of these respective 'banana' countries to take care of their own displaced workers.

> Pineapple world in Hawaii had problems due to fruit leaching nutrients out of soil. They all had to figure out the problem and how to solve it. And yes - Dole was one of the original developers in Hawaii - included sugar cane.

Yes. They replenished the iron deficient growing soil.

The Nicaraguans & Hondurans should be able to correct for banana pestilence...unless this is a corporate conspiracy to exploit the unskilled labor forces in Mexico, the Philippines & Ecuador in which case the bananas themselves cannot be be held accountable for such avaricious measures. They are but a simple fruit with no ulterior motives towards mankind or the global economy.


14 people like this
Posted by Katy
a resident of Professorville
on May 23, 2019 at 1:24 pm

Don't engage with the crazy fruit conspiracy that claims pineapple is causing all our problems.

Even the mockery isn't sinking in.


2 people like this
Posted by WordHawk
a resident of Downtown North
on May 23, 2019 at 2:12 pm

Of concern: if they continue their ways, underage criminals such as these run a high risk of being shot dead by those citizens who keep firearms in their homes. (I do not advocate such.) The idea is prevention through education and rehabilitation --- persuade "kids" like these that life holds other options. Death does nothing to solve underlying causes. Long-term incarceration might. At the age of these two, drug dependency is often a cause. Gang behavior is also often at the root --- desperate people behave desperately. At 15 and 17, even juveniles who grew up in stable, well-off families often exhibit wildly immature behavior. A predictable life-course often has to wait until closer to age 30.


4 people like this
Posted by Looking The Other Way On Crime
a resident of another community
on May 23, 2019 at 2:41 pm

The only way to maintain an ongoing pattern of anti-social behavior without the risk of having to go to jail on a regular basis is to select an occupation such as professional sports or pop music. Then living to the excess & breaking the law becomes a tabloid-bound or typical sports-related lifestyle.

The excessive amounts of money being made by the top-flight athletes & performing artists allows them the opportunity to break laws at random & ease of access to expensive attorneys and designer treatment centers ensures its continuity. Plus they don't have to steal anything as they can afford just about anything they want.

The key of course is to have the inherent athletic skills or talent to be able to carry on in such a manner. Those who are not blessed with these professional gifts are limited in their options & more than likely, destined for prison somewhere along the line.

Many upper echelon professional athletes and performing artists are troubled people to begin with and that's often what makes them interesting people to talk or read about. Very few are goody-two shoes.








4 people like this
Posted by Annoyed
a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on May 23, 2019 at 5:46 pm

1. The "alleged" perpetrators are not boys, they are men. The word "boys" imparts qualities of innocence that are lacking in these individuals.

2. I agree that juveniles who "allegedly" commit heinous crimes should be named and their photos shown.

3. Is it too much of a stretch to assume that these perpetrators might be part of one of these Central American gangs? If that's so then folks need to stop burying their heads in the sand about what is happening at our borders. Our government needs to do something, anything. Just letting thousands of jobless youth into our country without any background checks or support services is a recipe for crime. Just sayin'.

4. Freakonomics recently did an excellent podcast about bananas. Web Link


6 people like this
Posted by ICE Man Cometh
a resident of Barron Park
on May 23, 2019 at 5:55 pm

> Just letting thousands of jobless youth into our country without any background checks or support services is a recipe for crime. Just sayin'.

We don't know (as of yet) whether these individuals are US citizens or illegals.
If they are American citizens, there are jails & prisons to accommodate their sequestering from the American public at large.

If they are here illegally, then ICE should be contacted ASAP & deportation protocols expediently enacted.

If they are 'Dreamers' (DACA), deport them & let them do their dreaming somewhere else...as in south od the US border.

The American Dream does not involve or include terrorizing elder citizens and robbing them.


6 people like this
Posted by Eddie Spaghetti
a resident of College Terrace
on May 23, 2019 at 8:14 pm

The 15-year-old was already on probation. Career criminal. The other is less than a year away from 18. Try them both as adults, give them the maximum sentence and throw away the key. Enjoy your time in the hooscow, boys. Say "hi" to Bubba for me.

The media must use the word "alleged" because they haven't been convicted of this crime in a court of law. It's standard for the media and CYA for Palo Alto Online.


4 people like this
Posted by Chrisc
a resident of College Terrace
on May 24, 2019 at 7:52 am

Thank you PAPD.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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