News

Off Deadline: Bringing real-world humanity to the Great Immigration Debate

 

As the Great Immigration Debate rages in America and other countries, there's a modest bit of sanity — and humanity — happening in Palo Alto that brings people virtually face to face with real immigrants.

It is a resource that enables people to judge for themselves what is real versus fake in the exchange of views and epithets.


Jay Thorwaldson
The source is a website (madeintoamerica.org) that has built an archive of about 500 immigrant stories, some of which reach back generations.

It is the product of soft-spoken but visionary Elliot Margolies, who has been affiliated with the Media Center in Palo Alto since its inception in 1990, when it was part of Cable Co-op, the original operator of local cable television, later bought out by AT&T. Margolies served as the center's executive director for 11 years before stepping down to focus on special projects.

One such project, he said, set the stage for a partnership with the Day Workers Center in Mountain View that led to the development of the "Made into America" database.

"My first entrance to the immigration projects on media was when I was a volunteer at the Day Workers Center in Mountain View (circa 2010) and I asked Maria Marroquin, the director, if I could write a grant proposal to train some workers on video production — and we jointly made a documentary about their lives," Margolies said.

"Borderless Dreams" is now used at community meetings when the workers center is trying to tell people about who they are.

"There were eight of them who went through the training and did the recording. They all came from different countries and found the Day Workers Center, which supports them with (English) classes and helps them find work," he said.

Marroquin herself is an immigrant who came from Mexico with her son and has been widely recognized for her work with immigrants.

Margolies said the $20,000 grant from the Silicon Valley Community Foundation was pivotal: "That grant enabled me not just to work with the day workers, but the foundation connected me with eight other organizations that provide services to new immigrants. So I learned a lot and was inspired by a variety of different groups."

Margolies also had a realization that impacted his life: "I thought that part of the problem with immigrant groups that are trying to build bridges with the community at large is the fact that nobody has the time to pay attention beyond a narrow range — and I include myself. ... It's hard to find the bandwidth to connect with people who are not in your immediate vision.

"So that's when I thought about starting a website that celebrated almost every American's background from another country. And that became the website archive of immigration stories called 'Made Into America.'

"At this point we have more than 500 stories of people who have come from every corner of the world, and from many different eras.

"We've got wonderful stories. It gives you an appreciation of the commonality, of the common experiences many people face when they start all over again from scratch in this amazing country."

Margolies said his basic inspiration "was to create an archive that would bring people together ... regardless of what country or what era they trace their immigration to," while "being under this common umbrella of families who are proud of their heritage" as they start a new life.

"It takes a lot of guts to start all over. Most people do not have a job waiting for them, and do not have command of English. And they're adults.

"I remember when I found my own grandfather's report card, from an English class, after work — he worked in the stockyards in Chicago. And you just feel a sense of appreciation and pride that they were able to do it. And usually a couple of generations later, the family has found its footing. His name was Usher Dushnitzer. He came in 1929, from Lithuania."

Margolies emphasizes that the immigrant-stories project was only possible due to significant support from others, such as the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, from Cal Humanities (formerly the Humanities Council for California), and the Bay Area-based Acton Family Giving fund.

There have been individuals who have had — and are still having — a huge impact on the stories project and on the topic of immigration as a whole, Margolies said.

One of those is Susan Chamberlain of the First Presbyterian Church of Palo Alto, who in February visited the Mexican border town of Nogales to observe the situation there. She and seven others from the church and 13 from the Presbyterian Church of San Jose spent six days seeing firsthand the high wall through Nogales that cut off community ties and access across the border. They hiked on a desert trail, interviewed asylum seekers and even a Border Patrol official, and witnessed court hearings where people were brought in shackled in groups of eight with no chance to tell their individual stories.

Members of the group are now working on how best to share their story of the soul-shaking tour.

As for the future of the immigrants-stories project, Margolies said there are community presentations and videos by the original eight day worker trainees — from Mexico, Central America and one from Peru — and others.

There's an open invitation to anyone to share a personal or family immigration story, in writing or on video or online.

Hostility to immigrants is historic, but there is a true crisis today, Margolies said. "Although Trump is the one who leads the charge visibly in our country, it's in other countries, too. There seems to be a wave of us-and-them feelings ... and it's crazy because we're facing, at the same time, more displacement through war than at any other time in world history.

"There are 65 million people who are out of their homes due to violence, and there are 22 million who are out of their countries looking for a place to live, like in refugee camps and whatnot."

Millions of stories.

Former Weekly Editor Jay Thorwaldson can be e-mailed at jaythor@well.com.

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Comments

90 people like this
Posted by Immigration Limits Are Appropriate
a resident of Crescent Park
on Apr 19, 2019 at 7:41 am

There are too many immigrants (both legal & illegal) coming to America.

There should be established immigration quotas based on (1) national origin, (2) education level, (3) economic self-sustainability & (4) public health considerations.

Expatriates are welcome to the USA but not one particular ethnic group over another in terms of the overall percentages. Keep the numbers in balance with minimal ESL factors if possible.

OR

Establish a lottery system & let chance determine the mix.

In any event, economic self-sufficiency & the ability to speak English are key criteria as the entitlement social service programs are overburdened & having to hire social workers representing 15-20 different language groups is absurd. This is an utter waste of taxpayer dollars...not to mention the printing costs & necessity for translators to prepare the various documents.

The Neil Diamond song 'America' is an anthem symbolizing unchecked and unregulated immigration....and I have come to detest it.


**********************************************************************************
"America"

Far,
We've been traveling far
Without a home
But not without a star

Free,
Only want to be free
We huddle close
Hang on to a dream

On the boats and on the planes
They're coming to America
Never looking back again,
They're coming to America

Home
Don't it seem so far away
Oh, we're traveling light today
In the eye of the storm
In the eye of the storm

Home
To a new and a shiny place
Make our bed and we'll say our grace
Freedom's light burning warm
Freedom's light burning warm

Everywhere around the world
They're coming to America
Ev'ry time that flag's unfurled
They're coming to America

Got a dream to take them there
They're coming to America
Got a dream they've come to share
They're coming to America

They're coming to America
They're coming to America
They're coming to America
They're coming to America
Today, Today,
Today, Today, Today

My country 'tis of thee (today)
Sweet land of liberty (today)
Of thee I sing (today)
Of thee I sing
Today, Today, Today
Today, today, today......


1 person likes this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Apr 19, 2019 at 8:26 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

This column is directed at Palo Alto. However immigration is happening all over the world with many from Africa trying to migrate to Western Europe and the US. What is lacking in these stories is the fact that each of the states that people migrate from if reviewed on Wikipedia has an established government. The established government is never mentioned. In the case of the Central American countries they have extensive histories and economic situations including tax free zones. Those tax free zones are what are killing those countries. In today's SJM the granting of tax free status within American cities is cited as a problem that needs to be corrected within American cities. Note Amazon in this case.

In the case of migration the US government is expected to negotiate with the government's of the countries who have the authority for their citizens. It is always a bottom's up presentation - not a top down presentation. Each Central American country has American companies that have come in, bought up land, and displaced the population by importing foreign labor. Most of the US companies are agricultural in nature. The most notable are headquartered in California.

Correcting the problem should involve helping the governments of those countries to realign their management of resources and tax set-up for development within the countries so that local citizens are put to work with fair wages and the countries provide the basic school and medical requirements for the citizens. To that end Wikipedia provides who the lead religious groups are within those countries. One would expect them to help stabilize the education and cultural base for those countries.


2 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Apr 19, 2019 at 8:26 am

The migration of peoples around the world has been going on for a very long time.In the past, emigration was viewed as a permanent move. Even with convicts being transported to Australia and other places, the length of time of the sentence was immaterial as the ability to return back home was slim and in many cases the conviction was an expected death sentence due to the harshness of life, particularly after release if the convict lasted that long. European migration to the "New World" in particular in the past was viewed by the emigrants as a permanent life circumstances change with no expectation of return either for relocation or visit.

Nowadays, few people really think of themselves as permanently emigrating from their homeland. Yes of course there are those who are seeking asylum and therefore a permanent move, but few others are willing to expect never to return home even if they expect to live in their new homeland for the remainder of their lives.

As are result, the modern view of emigration and immigration policies are complicated by the different types of visas, green cards, citizenship, etc. This is not just an American policy but all countries of the world have reams of red tape and paperwork to make the once simple process a lot more difficult and onerous, hence the abundance of immigration lawyers in all countries.

What makes it more complex is that when Americans decide to emigrate it is complicated by tax laws. The exit tax and the fact that all Americans must file and pay US taxes even if they are not earning any American dollars or have any American assets. The only way to prevent paying American taxes plus the need for a tax professional to be paid to file these taxes, many emigrant American citizens are choosing to renounce American citizenship for tax reasons rather than anything else.

Immigration to California in particular is primarily due to people looking for work or for education. These immigrants don't always think of themselves as having emigrated from their homeland and many hope and do return.

Immigration - at least legal immigration - is not a one size fits all situation. Trying to put all immigrants into one category is a very narrow view of the reality of what is happening.

And one additional thought, the pregnancy tourists who arrive here with the sole intention of giving birth (sometimes of a child not yet conceived) to an American citizen and returning home as soon as the birth is registered and a passport can be obtained, is becoming quite a trend. The return of these American citizens for college and work some 18 years later is going to make for interesting future problems if they haven't started doing so already. A US citizen with poor language and cultural skills due to having lived in parents' homeland for all their formative years will affect Silicon Valley. As they return and decide to bring in their parents to retire here will be a consequence of this pregnancy tourism. Anchor Babies will affect immigration, no doubt about it.


48 people like this
Posted by WWJD
a resident of Mayfield
on Apr 19, 2019 at 9:10 am

> ..and I have come to detest it

Yet you post the full song instead of a link. Odd choice.

Neil Diamond descended from Russian and Polish immigrants. I'm from European immigrants as well, all of whom came freely and were allowed in as long as they didn't have symptoms of TB, etc.. Treated like crap, worked their way up. Just as most immigrants do these days, in low wage jobs, retail, motels, etc..

I'll listen to the other side once their obstructing leader apologizes for employing illegals.

Once his companies stop bringing in cheap foreign workers on work visas.

Otherwise - y'all hypocrites, unless you are a descendant of our indigenous peoples.

May God bless America.


71 people like this
Posted by Immigration Limits Are Appropriate
a resident of Crescent Park
on Apr 19, 2019 at 9:16 am

"the pregnancy tourists who arrive here with the sole intention of giving birth (sometimes of a child not yet conceived) to an American citizen and returning home as soon as the birth is registered and a passport can be obtained, is becoming quite a trend. The return of these American citizens for college and work some 18 years later is going to make for interesting future problems if they haven't started doing so already...As they return and decide to bring in their parents to retire here will be a consequence of this pregnancy tourism. Anchor Babies will affect immigration, no doubt about it."

^^^ This particular citizenship loophole is being exploited by those who can (1) AFFORD to travel by air to the USA, (2) AFFORD to vacation or procure an extended stay in the USA, and (3) AFFORD to cover the medical expenses involving childbirth & post-natal care out of pocket.

These are not the immigrants from Central America making 'a run for the border' but rather those individuals with the financial resources from overseas Asian countries.

BTW...this questionable 'birthright' practice does not include Japan as those who have ever worked with (or for) Japanese corporations know that the executives & managers from Japan most always return home to Japan after their assignment or tenure is up.

For reasons of their own, the Japanese seem to prefer returning to their native country even though many of them enjoy their business stay in America.

You won't see any Japanese (from Japan) pulling this anchor baby stunt as they are proud of their own national heritage.

This says a lot when it comes to permanent emigration from other countries.


57 people like this
Posted by Sanctimonious City
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 19, 2019 at 9:16 am

Sanctimonious City is a registered user.

What would truly bring real world humanity to the immigration debate would be if democratically elected governments actually followed the will of their people.

Sadly, both in Brexit and the 2016 US election the mandate to reduce and control illegal immigration has been ignored. Citizen surveys over the last three decades have shown consistent majority support for that viewpoint. Instead, we get silent coups and $20K propaganda videos funded by left wing tax deductions.

Tyranny with a human face is still just a figurative velvet knife plunged into the back of the electorate.


68 people like this
Posted by Immigration Limits Are Appropriate
a resident of Crescent Park
on Apr 19, 2019 at 9:23 am

> Yet you post the full song instead of a link. Odd choice.

Not really. The printed lyrics tend to intensify the point...that hordes of immigrants still want to come to America & many perceive their arrival as a saving grace.

Which it is not.


28 people like this
Posted by WWJD
a resident of Mayfield
on Apr 19, 2019 at 9:54 am

> Sadly, ... the 2016 US election the mandate to reduce and control illegal immigration has been ignored. ... funded by left wing tax deductions.

Ridiculous - Trump had a GOP House and Senate for two years and did nothing. They have and continue to use immigration to get low iq voters to vote for them, with demonstrably *zero* intentions to ever do anything about it.

They used the base, lied to them and did nothing. Build a wall? Hah, they didn't spend a dime. Pelosi and Schumer offered $25 billion for a wall and DACA fix and the GOP couldn't take yes for an answer.

Trump used the base. Lied to them. And now claims he wants a wall when he could have had it with complete GOP control.

...

Face it: the GOP is just like an ex-girlfriend to their base - they're just not into you anymore. She walked away from you, arm-in-arm with her sugar daddy (big business that wants cheap labor) and leaves you alone playing video games and posting on blogs, while she dances the night away with a rich CEO.

Until 2020. Then they'll smile pretty and the dummies will get weak-kneed, cry a little, and well, you remember the cycle, don't ya? Bush did the same thing 2002-2006.

2020 - the false promises start again. "Honey, it's really you that I want to build a wall with!" And you will get used again. In the meantime, you'll post all sorts of rants on here and elsewhere, blaming her new boyfriend as some sort of 'librul' while she ignores you for 2 years. Then smiles...

Wow, that's gotta leave a mark.

When are you guys dumping her and starting a new party? Third Way? Maybe a new nativist party, cloaked in "Common Sense" solutions? Something else? Time for an intervention. November 2018 should have been a clue.


1 person likes this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Apr 19, 2019 at 11:00 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

The bottoms-up approach to immigration is side stepping the governmental issues related to operating in foreign countries. The three Central American countries are on a parallel with the Hawaiian Islands and share much of the same history. The Hawaiian history is centered on displacement of the Polynesian culture while the Central American countries are experiencing displacement of the Mayan/Latin population. If you go the Expedia pages for each of these countries you will find American hotels as well as other luxury hotels, airports with American carriers, ports for cruise lines. If you go into the history of these countries you will find the same companies managing sugar cane which was shipped to Baltimore - then the second biggest port on the east cost - United Fruit. Hawaiian sugar cane was processed on the Hawaiian islands and then shipped to California - C&H. So this process is a mimic of Hawaii prior to it becoming a territory and state. And the same resentment and problems by the native residents. Same involvement by religious organizations which eventually ended up owning much of the land.

Addressing the problems of these countries needs an approach in which the respective governments create a wellness within the countries so that the resident native population can be integrated into the current commercial endeavors which have grown the economy. The current process of stampeding the population is helping to downgrade these countries.

Maybe they will end up being territories and eventually states.


50 people like this
Posted by “Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 19, 2019 at 12:04 pm

Great Britain, France, Germany & the United States are now realizing the pitfalls and drawbacks of 'open door' immigration to their respective countries.

The lack of societal assimilation & vast cultural differences do not equate to the ideal concept of a diversified society.

It only breeds resentment...both on the part of those firmly established + those who cannot (or are unable) to 'fit in' with the cultural norms and practices of their newly chosen country of residence.

The quote on the Statue of Liberty should read, "That was then and now is now. No more room at the inn."

In addition, the aforementioned countries have now become active breeding grounds for terrorism by expatriate malcontents who cannot adapt sufficiently to the customs of their new countries of residence.

It is not the responsibility of the host country & its citizens to adapt to the the recently or newly arrived immigrants but rather the other way around as it comes with the territory.

London, Paris, Queens/New York are prime examples of conflicting sub-societies where mixing oil & water results in absolutely no cultural emulsification.


1 person likes this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Apr 19, 2019 at 12:23 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

I was just on the Amazon site checking into United Fruit. A whole list of books on this company and the upheaval and CIA connections swirling around the American involvement in the Central American countries. Check it out. I will go to the library to see if they have any of these books. United Fruit has been eclipsed by Dole Food Company and Del Monte Corporation.

Is this on topic? Yes - we are focusing on the Central American immigration that is occurring right now. Who is stampeding all of these people? Why aren't they working in the ports, airports, Hotels, tourist adventures, historic restoration? Someone is selling them a bill of goods and the press never tells you who the Presidents of these countries are. The press needs to work the government personnel on these countries. They are the only people who can actually change the situation.


60 people like this
Posted by pearl
a resident of another community
on Apr 19, 2019 at 3:09 pm

pearl is a registered user.

American taxpayers are footing the bill for the babies of pregnant illegals who cross the border into the United States when they go into labor to have their babies (Anchor Babies) here, automatically making those babies American citizens, who then become eligible for all kinds of welfare which is paid for by American taxpayers. We need to encourage our elected officials to enact laws doing away with the "Anchor Baby" practice.


56 people like this
Posted by Anchors Away
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 19, 2019 at 3:35 pm

> We need to encourage our elected officials to enact laws doing away with the "Anchor Baby" practice.

Agreeing with pearl but as another poster noted, this practice knows no socio-economic boundaries as 'Anchor Mothers' from both China & Latin America are practitioners of this US citizenship scheme.

The only difference is that for some, money is no object. For others, it is a gateway to tax-payer funded social entitlement programs.

The framers of the US Constitution did not foresee this happening when they drafted US citizenship mandates.


Like this comment
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Apr 19, 2019 at 5:37 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

NPR (KQED) has great stories on the early America and it's growth. Lewis and Clark crossed the US to the Pacific Ocean and found the British selling fur to the Chinese. They went back to DC and said we need migration to fill in the middle of the US, also to help build the railroad. The US paid people to come - I have relatives who had their ship transit paid for based on a two year contract to work in the mines. Yes we needed migration to work in the evolving manufacturing business -automobiles, steel, shipping. Also farming to feed the cities growing up along the rail lines. The World Wars drove the need for ships and armaments, uniforms, shoes. So we filled in the need until there was no longer a need. Baltimore was the second biggest port on the east coast with Steel mills, produce, spices, sugar. Now the city is struggling with the major employer being John-Hopkins - a non-profit who is not a tax contributor. The need for migration is partly based on the business base of the country and it's various regions of specialty. You need different arguments now for immigration - education based for new technologies. It is an adjustment based on need.


40 people like this
Posted by 2-4-6-8...Just Assimilate
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 19, 2019 at 6:13 pm

>> London, Paris, Queens/New York are prime examples of conflicting sub-societies where mixing oil & water results in absolutely no cultural emulsification.

I have been to these cities & concur as many of the recent immigrants there stubbornly cling to their 'old ways' making no apparent effort to ASSIMILATE into mainstream American or Western European culture.

Then they complain about being viewed as outcasts.

The key... it's OK to maintain your 'culture' at family & social/church gatherings but don't expect your host country to adopt to your ethnic mannerisms. It doesn't work that way.

The same would apply if some 'westerner' moved to a different country/culture.

Adaptation & not 'sticking out like a sore thumb' OR ramming your cultural beliefs & practices down other people's throats is the key to getting along in one's new country of residence.


17 people like this
Posted by Sanctimonious City
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 19, 2019 at 9:16 pm

Sanctimonious City is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


6 people like this
Posted by Toot
a resident of College Terrace
on Apr 19, 2019 at 10:15 pm

WWJD left a mark on Santi.

I'm with Jesus. I know what He would do. In fact, He has told us. Drop by this weekend and He'll share the word.


Like this comment
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Apr 19, 2019 at 10:49 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

WOW - WWJD is thinking outside the box here. It is like a novella. So can we have some reality here? Reading a book I got at the library turns out that in Guatemala most of the industry is owned by American industries operating in their tax free zone. And the country is a major importer of American goods. So one can see the resistance to anything that upsets this dynamic. Must be a lot of lobbying going on to dissuade any restrictions.

However if you look at the current situation we are in here we have school teachers throughout the state striking due to class size, poor pay, and living far from their school systems. Then we have nurses striking. And how about the homeless that is growing and unsupportable. At some point you cannot isolate each topic as a stand alone political point. Each addition of population increases the strain on the whole system. We do not have jobs for the current group of immigrants -and their own countries are motivating them to leave. I think that we need to help them run their country more efficiently which means that they need to make some decisions regarding how they run their country and the tax free status. It is not helping them at this point in time.


56 people like this
Posted by The Last Straw
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 20, 2019 at 8:42 am

> I'm with Jesus. I know what He would do. In fact, He has told us.

Uh...have you read Revelations?


Like this comment
Posted by Toot
a resident of College Terrace
on Apr 20, 2019 at 8:54 am

Not an easy read. Do you read it on Good Friday as a tradition?

How are you applying it here?


36 people like this
Posted by The Last Straw
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 20, 2019 at 9:27 am

> Do you read it on Good Friday as a tradition?

No...because dying for the sins of man is not a reasonable assurance that things will get any better.

> How are you applying it here?

As 'game over'...an evolving sense of humanity & kindness on the part of 'God's children' never truly emerged.

You can almost picture an exasperated & angry father (God) telling his idealistic son (Jesus), "I told you so. Now let's get back to business."

And so it goes...


1 person likes this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Apr 20, 2019 at 10:39 am

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

So happy that we are talking about Jesus here as Easter Sunday is upon us. However let's remember that Jesus was in the middle of the Roman Empire dealing with people being thrown to the lions for entertainment. The Roman Empire was the law of the land. We are not in North Africa or Southern Europe. And if you saw the movie Spartacus bodies were lined up on crosses as far as the eye could see in what in now Italy. We are here in the US with laws that do not include being thrown to the lions. However taxation is a favorite topic.
I am reading "The Fish that Ate the Whale" by Rich Cohen -very entertaining book about the evolution of the Banana Republic which includes the CA countries of migrants and the land is owned by American companies. This goes back to the early 1900's and moves forward to describe how American colonization by major companies works.

Our job is to identify the major companies that are currently working in these countries and put the focus on what they are doing there and why they are orchestrating these migrations. And to put this in context of time why the churches are not working within the countries to correct the problem.
My take is that Jesus would prefer that approach as opposed to pushing migrations all over the world. I heard on the radio that the current Pope is being criticized by his subordinates that his theories on migration all over the world is disrupting countries and leading to destabilization. That criticism includes Africa.


39 people like this
Posted by Keep The People Numbers DOWN!
a resident of another community
on Apr 20, 2019 at 12:25 pm

"As 'game over'...an evolving sense of humanity & kindness on the part of 'God's children' never truly emerged."

On a more micro and interpersonal level, rudeness and inconsideration towards others seems to be on the upswing as well.

Perhaps attributable to the increasing number of people vying for the same space...akin to the venerable crowded rats in a cage experiment.

That said, too many people in any given living environment = MORE PROBLEMS.

Current USA population (2018) is 372.2 million. When I was of elementary school age, the US population was around 200 million.

Things were much better back then...less stress with fewer irritations brought about by other people infringing upon one's 'cloud'.

An eventual USA population of 400+ million will be a total hellhole.

Population control via restricted immigration & a lower overall birth rate is all we can possibly hope for.


7 people like this
Posted by Toot
a resident of College Terrace
on Apr 20, 2019 at 12:57 pm

372.2 million vs over 400 million - not sure that's a big difference.

However, WWJD addressed that part of immigration with the parable about the GOP dropping their voters for a new boyfriend, the rich CEO who wants MORE workers in the US. Which is why sensible immigration reform will never happen while the GOP sleeps with corporations. They've had complete control. Never even held a hearing, let alone sent a bill to 45.


17 people like this
Posted by Population Changes
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Apr 20, 2019 at 2:06 pm

> 372.2 million vs over 400 million - not sure that's a big difference.

The US population 'normally' increases roughly 12%-14% every decade (about 20-25 million).

In 2000 it was 291,421,906...today 372,200,000.

Since the birthrate among tenured generational American citizens has stabilized to a certain degree, this massive population increase is primarily due to the massive influx of immigration from overseas + south of the border along with their subsequent offspring.

The demographics of the SF Bay Area have changed dramatically over the past two decades especially in the more desirable cities & neighborhoods...whether this change is for the better or worse is not for me to say as I will keep those comments to myself.




30 people like this
Posted by Immigration Limits Are Appropriate
a resident of Crescent Park
on Apr 21, 2019 at 10:12 am

Immigration Limits Are Appropriate is a registered user.

It appears that there are many individuals who have their apprehensions regarding further immigration into the United States.

At one time, an 'Open Door' policy may have been OK but there are many parts of the country that have reached their saturation points in terms of population & housing densities and their fiscal ability to accommodate countless new arrivals via social service entitlement programs and viable employment opportunities.

ESL requirements will also place an additional financial strain on public school systems and any lack thereof will only increase the numbers of immigrant children from the poorer sections of the world getting further & further behind educationally and vocationally which in turn will place an added strain on the various social services (as well as taxpayers) to assist and provide the basic living requirements of everyday life.

Is this what US citizens really want for America and does the United States have the moral responsibility to take in anybody and everybody who wants come to this country?

For those still in favor of mass immigration, a possible suggestion...

(1) Provide individual/group sponsorships OUT OF YOUR OWN POCKET to accommodate those wishing to migrate to America while ensuring that their basic needs (food, shelter, clothing, medical) will be met and also be willing to assume full legal and financial responsibility for any criminal and/or civil misdeeds on the part of those you are endorsing for immigration.

(2) Provide viable work opportunities for unskilled immigrant labor pools and cover all educational expenses pertaining to achieving proficient ESL skills both on the part of the parents and their children.

While diversity and a 'melting pot' demographic concept is an American ideal to some, it is not the fiscal or moral responsibility of the American taxpayers to provide such opportunities if economic self-sufficiency on the part of the immigrants cannot be met on their own.

Of note from some previous posters:

> Current USA population (2018) is 372.2 million. When I was of elementary school age, the US population was around 200 million...An eventual USA population of 400+ million will be a total hellhole.

>> In 2000 it was 291,421,906...today 372,200,000.

>>> 372.2 million vs over 400 million - not sure that's a big difference.

Seriously? The poster who cited 200 million while growing up as a youngster was probably referring to the period between 1960-1970.

Anyone who considers a doubling of the entire US population in less than 50 years as a minor difference...no comment.

And meanwhile people are concerned (as well as complaining) about the serious housing shortages around here and elsewhere...along with the environmental and quality of life ramifications?

As aforementioned...off to Big Sky. This old Crescent Park house is good for some serious acreage in Montana.








3 people like this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Apr 21, 2019 at 5:34 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

This is not a GOP vs Dem issue. It is about major corporations taking over other country assets. United Fruit is the historic master mind here and is now represented by Dole and Del Monte. If you take up the current trend be reminded that Mr. FB is buying up Kawai, Mr. Oracle owns Lanai, Mr. Dell and the Pelosi's control a lot of Hawaiian land and are branched out to other Caribbean areas. When corporations buy up land they bring in other workers who displace the citizens of the host country. A lot of deals go down here. So you are looking at a lot of deals going down and a lot of displaced people who have been pushed out of the in-country workplace. That tends to get people angry. So time to get back to the deals and deal makers who have created this mess. It has been a long time in the making. Attempts to make this a religious issue or a GOP/Dem issue is just to draw attention away from this mess.


11 people like this
Posted by Parker Leahy
a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Apr 22, 2019 at 11:53 am

Parker Leahy is a registered user.

"...you are looking at a lot of deals going down and a lot of displaced people who have been pushed out of the in-country workplace."

Seriously? So you are saying that native cheap labor is being replaced by imported cheap labor just to pick bananas & work in tourist resorts?

Get real. The native inhabitants are departing because of human rights issues, unstable governments & local crime.


2 people like this
Posted by Resident 1-Adobe Meadows
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Apr 22, 2019 at 7:07 pm

Resident 1-Adobe Meadows is a registered user.

Just finished "The Fish that Ate the Whale' by Rich Cohen. This traces the business of banana plantations going back to the beginning - early 1900's. Great book. It explains the whole business which includes fleets of ships that were used in WW2, CIA intervention to remove a president that was suspected of being a communist, includes Che Guevara, and is a great read. If you are not into great reads you can refer to Wikipedia for United Fruit Company. The whole area of the Central Americas was very busy. The citizens started demanding unionization and rights after WW2. Another book "Doing Business Beyond America's Borders" - Tuller - indicates that most businesses in the CA countries are owned by other countries. I am just reporting what appears to be known by other people who do business down there. The countries that are doing business down there now need to be investigated for human rights issues.


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