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Santa Clara County reports new measles case

Public health officer advises public to contact their doctor if they have symptoms associated with disease

Santa Clara County reported a second case of measles within one week on Friday, saying a county resident contracted the infection while traveling abroad.

Public risk from the case is very low, according to the county, which is contacting everyone who may have come into contact with the person.

The case is unrelated to one reported on Tuesday involving an international traveler who visited 20 locations in the county last week, including six locations within the Palo Alto area.

County public health officials said the rate of measles vaccination in Santa Clara County is very high, so most people are protected from the infection. People with weakened immune systems or unvaccinated children are at higher risk.

County Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody said to call a doctor immediately if anyone who may have contracted measles experiences fever, cough, red eyes, runny nose and a rash beginning on the face.

Health officials also reminded anyone planning international travel to make sure they are up to date on their vaccinations.

For more information about measles, go to sccgov.org.

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Comments

8 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Downtown North
on Mar 29, 2019 at 2:42 pm

Did this person catch the measles despite being vaccinated? Or did they avoid being vaccinated for some reason?


Like this comment
Posted by Not antivax
a resident of Midtown
on Apr 3, 2019 at 8:03 am

I venture to guess that this traveler with measles is NOT anti vacinnation based on personal or religious beliefs. I think that phenomenon is mostly a US or UK one. Most other countries don't vaccinate if they can't.


Like this comment
Posted by what?
a resident of Green Acres
on Apr 3, 2019 at 8:29 am

>>> Most other countries don't vaccinate if they can't.

Huh?


10 people like this
Posted by Colin Winslow
a resident of Crescent Park
on Apr 3, 2019 at 9:10 am

Colin Winslow is a registered user.

> Most other countries don't vaccinate if they can't.

Global immunization for measles & rubella is pretty extensive.

The areas/countries that are somewhat lax in this practice are parts of Africa, Indonesia/Malaysia & India/Pakistan.

The enclosed URL shows a map of those specific regions.

Web Link

Unless one had measles as a child, it is probably best to be vaccinated if traveling abroad to countries where vaccination for measles/rubella is minimal.

Immigrants arriving to the United States from certain regions should probably be vaccinated as well or held in quarantine pending medical clearance.

Religion and/or personal beliefs should not be a factor or consideration when it comes to the public health of a large population (i.e. the United States). Those wishing to enter or reside in the United States need to address these health issues or not be allowed to enter or remain in the country.


Like this comment
Posted by Anon
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Apr 3, 2019 at 11:09 am

Posted by Colin Winslow, a resident of Crescent Park

>> The enclosed URL shows a map of those specific regions.

Most of the areas on the map are either zones of civil war/unrest, or, have areas lacking in strong government presence. I'm puzzled by India, though. India should be able to solve its immunization deficit. Why doesn't it?


8 people like this
Posted by CoffeeTime
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 3, 2019 at 2:22 pm

CoffeeTime is a registered user.

> I'm puzzled by India, though. India should be able to solve its immunization deficit. Why doesn't it?

Although India is a leading producer and exporter of vaccines, the country is home to one-third of the world's unimmunized children. Fewer than 44 percent of India's young children receive the full schedule of immunizations. India's vaccine deficit has several causes: little investment by the government; a focus on polio eradication at the expense of other immunizations; and low demand as a consequence of a poorly educated population and the presence of anti-vaccine advocates.


Like this comment
Posted by what?
a resident of Green Acres
on Apr 3, 2019 at 2:45 pm

>>> anti-vaccine advocates

Well, doesn't that seem highfalutin. I seem to recall there is a much shorter name for such 'folk'.


Like this comment
Posted by Parker Jameson
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Apr 3, 2019 at 6:21 pm

Parker Jameson is a registered user.

> ...a consequence of a poorly educated population and the presence of anti-vaccine advocates.

Ignorance + religious and/or ethnic dogma = minimal vaccinations in some countries.

In Africa, vaccinations are viewed by some as a western plot for genocide.





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