News


Local parents, Stanford coach indicted in college-admissions scandal

Nationwide FBI investigation uncovers alleged bribes in exchange for false athletic profiles, SAT and ACT scores

A federal court document filed in the U.S. District Court in Massachusetts details how former Stanford sailing coach John Vandemoer assisted William "Rick" Singer in a college admissions scam by designating Stanford University applicants as sailing recruits despite their minimal to no experience in the sport for money. Vandemoer and Singer pleaded guilty to multiple charges in the case on March 12, 2019. Excerpt from complaint provided by Department of Justice.

Also read: Feds: Parents paid tens of thousands to game the admissions system

Numerous local parents and a Stanford University coach are among the dozens indicted in a nationwide college-admissions investigation that involved alleged bribes totaling $25 million in exchange for help getting students into top universities, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Boston announced Tuesday.

At least one parent paid $6.5 million, according to federal prosecutors.

The wide-ranging case, dubbed "Operation Varsity Blues," is the "largest college-admissions scam ever prosecuted by the Department of Justice," U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts Andrew Lelling said at a press conference Tuesday.

Stanford head sailing coach John Vandemoer is one of 50 people indicted in the scandal, which involved rigging the admissions system to help the children get into the nation's elite universities. The scam included bribes, a sham charity organization, falsified athletic profiles and cheating on SAT and ACT scores, among other alleged crimes, Lelling said.

The other coaches were from Yale University, the University of Southern California, Wake Forest University and Georgetown University, among other universities, federal prosecutors said.

Among the indicted are 33 parents, whom Lelling called "a catalog of wealth and privilege." They include CEOs of private and public companies; securities and real estate investors; and the chair of a global law firm. Actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, whose children were admitted to the universities, were also indicted.

"In return for bribes, these coaches agreed to pretend that certain applicants were recruited competitive athletes when in fact the applicants were not, as the coaches knew the student's athletic credentials had been fabricated," Lelling said.

The DOJ complaint charges six Midpeninsula residents with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud: Palo Alto residents Amy Colburn, 59, and Dr. Gregory Colburn, 61; Menlo Park residents Marjorie Klapper, 50, co-owner of jewelry business M&M Bling in Palo Alto, and Peter Jan Sartorio, 53, a packaged food entrepreneur; and Atherton residents Elizabeth Henriquez, 56, and Manuel Henriquez, 55, who was CEO of venture capital and private equity firm Hercules Capital in Palo Alto until his voluntary resignation announced Wednesday in a company press release. (View a full list of the individuals indicted here).

Other Bay Area residents indicted have business and community ties with the Midpeninsula. Marci Palatella, 63, of Healdsburg, is a longtime donor to Sacred Heart Schools in Atherton where an athletic field was named after her family. She is the CEO of liquor distribution company Preservation Distillery in Kentucky, which falls under her Burlingame-based company Allied Lomar Inc. (also known as International Beverage), and wife of Lou Palatella, a former player for the San Francisco 49ers.

Hillsborough residents Davina Isackson, 55, and Bruce Isackson 61, president of commercial real estate firm WP Investments in Woodside, were also charged.

Two SAT and ACT exam administrators, an exam proctor, a college administrator and nine coaches were also charged.

The exam administrators allegedly allowed a test taker to secretly complete the tests for the students or correct their answers after completing the exam, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office.

Vandemoer pleaded guilty to a charge of information with racketeering conspiracy Tuesday afternoon in Boston, Lelling said. A federal court document dated March 5 indicates he was engaged in the alleged conspiracy from about 2016 to last February.

He is scheduled for sentencing on June 12. Under a plea agreement, Vandemoer faces up to 20 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a $250,000 fine.

Newport Beach resident William "Rick" Singer, 58, the "alleged mastermind" behind the scheme carried out between 2011 and last month, also pleaded guilty Tuesday in Boston. Singer, who has worked in the college counseling business, allegedly used his connections with Division I coaches and parents to create the fake athletic credentials. He has been charged with racketeering conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy, conspiracy to defraud the United States and obstruction of justice.

Singer faces up to 65 years in prison, three years of supervised release, a $1.25 million fine and $400 in mandatory special assessment fees when he is sentenced on June 12.

The coaches allegedly used the credentials to convince fellow athletic department staff that the admitted student was a good fit for their team, according to Lelling.

No students have been charged in the case nor have the universities to which they were admitted, Lelling said. A vast majority of the admitted applicants are current students.

In a statement Tuesday, Stanford University stated it has terminated Vandemoer's employment and is cooperating with the Department of Justice's investigation.

"The alleged behavior runs completely counter to Stanford's values," the university announcement stated.

The complaint against Vandemoer alleges he entered into agreements with Singer to designate two student applicants as Stanford sailing recruits. Those students, however, ended up not attending the university.

The first agreement was entered into in summer 2017, when one applicant was purported to be a competitive sailor. Last May, the student deferred his application for a year, and the Stanford sailing program received a $110,000 payment to list the recruit in the following year's cycle.

When the first deal fell through, Vandemoer allegedly agreed to give the same spot in the sailing program to another applicant for $500,000. The second recruit was listed as a competitive sailor but had "minimal sailing experience," and in the end didn't attend Stanford, according to the charging document. Vandemoer allegedly accepted $160,000 from Singer to use the funds "for a future student's purported recruitment."

Before his work termination, Vandemoer was in the middle of his 11th year as Stanford's head sailing coach, according to his profile on Stanford Athletics website. Under his tenure, the team won 29 of 30 Pacific Coast Collegiate Sailing Conference championships. He previously served as head coach for the U.S. Naval Academy from 2006 to 2008, when he led the Midshipmen to five national championship appearances.

Stanford stated it does not have evidence that other members of the university were involved in the alleged conspiracy, based on the federal investigation to date, and will conduct an internal review to ensure no other members of the university were involved.

Stanford University President Marc Tessier-Lavigne and Provost Persis Drell issued a statement through the "Notes from the Quad" blog, emphasizing that the alleged behavior by the indicted in the federal case are "absolutely contrary to Stanford's values, and to the norms this university has lived by for decades."

They detailed the university's admissions process, which considers a student's academic performance, extracurricular activity and "personal context" in selecting who is awarded admission. "Special talents," which includes athletics, is also factored in through coaches who pinpoint promising recruits to the admission office for review, but "by themselves never ensure admission to Stanford."

Tessier-Lavigne and Drell also wrote that they will make sure the university doesn't benefit from the funds made to the Stanford sailing program as part of the scheme.

As of Tuesday morning, 38 individuals have been taken into custody, seven are working toward surrendering to authorities and four are expected to plead guilty — two Tuesday and two others in the coming weeks, according to FBI Special Agent in Charge Joseph Bonavolonta.

Hundreds of investigators have been looking into the allegations since last May as a result of an unrelated cover-up investigation. All the individuals charged played a role in "corruption and greed," Bonavolonta said. The case robbed students nationwide of getting a fair shot at attending elite universities, he said.

"Today's arrests should be a warning to others. You can't lie and cheat to get ahead because you will get caught," Bonavolonta said at Tuesday's press conference.

Singer allegedly set up a charity, Key Worldwide Foundation, through which to funnel the bribes, according to Special Agent in Charge Kristina O'Connell of the IRS Criminal Investigation in Boston. The contributions were deducted from the parents' federal income taxes, the U.S. Attorney's Office said.

Singer conducted his college counseling and preparation work through his business Edge College & Career Network LLC, which was also known as The Key, according to federal prosecutors. He allegedly told his clients to request their student take additional time on the test by claiming their child had learning disabilities, the U.S. Attorney's Office said. They were also told to change their test center to either one in Houston, Texas or West Hollywood, where one of two test administrators took the bribes, around $10,000 per test, in exchange for allowing the cheating that often took place in a one-on-one setting.

Parents paid between $250,000 to $6.5 million to make sure their students were admitted to a top university, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. A total $25 million in bribes was uncovered, according to federal prosecutors.

In one testimonial posted on The Key website, local parent Marci Palatella thanked Singer for his work with her son.

"My kid who could not read a poem in front of the class is now...in a comedy troupe!!! He is so happy about school! You were life changing for all of us," she wrote. "Your subtle style made us all comfortable, but it was your deep down encouragement that let him know there was hope for greatness. Bottom line is that you believed in him, and that made all the difference. For my kid to be getting A's plural... is incredible."

Related content:

• Listen to the March 15 episode of "Behind the Headlines," where Palo Alto college adviser John Raftrey discusses the implications of the nationwide admissions bribery scandal, now available on our YouTube channel and podcast.

Stanford students file class action lawsuit in admissions scandal

Pressure over college admissions 'out of control'

Ex-global equity firm exec, a grad of Gunn High, implicated in admissions scam

Opinion: Making the college-admissions system more equitable

Opinion: Lessons parents should learn from the college-admissions scandal

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Comments

98 people like this
Posted by RW
a resident of another community
on Mar 12, 2019 at 10:10 am

Wow. I'm shocked but not surprised. This is the perfect intersection of helicopter parenting and the wealthy getting ahead based on money, not merit. Add in a touch of elitism (*my* kid can't go to community college, pish posh) and you have a trifecta of ick. I wonder what the children think of what their parents are alleged to have done.


68 people like this
Posted by Michah
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 12, 2019 at 10:17 am

I’m not surprised at all.
As I said in the other thread, Stanford is not a good place to get an education. I went there in the 80’s (MSME) and most of the students I met were cheaters and unethical. The professors made you buy their own poorly edited books, and TAs taught their classes. I got a much better education at a UC down south.


64 people like this
Posted by Sally
a resident of Downtown North
on Mar 12, 2019 at 10:20 am

"Need blind" admission applies to all students... except for those to whom it doesn't.

There's a ton of shameful shady stuff in the admissions world that doesn't rise to the level of criminality. Par for the course these days. I'm sure our president got into Wharton because "he has the greatest brain."

3/4 of our social order is an embarrassment. Either get to work, or start practicing a good routine for how you'll explain your role to your grand kids.


43 people like this
Posted by 6Djockey
a resident of Green Acres
on Mar 12, 2019 at 11:02 am

6Djockey is a registered user.

In response to Michah, I have to disagree with your assessment of a Stanford education and the students at Stanford. I was there in the 70's (Ph.d. in ME) and never experienced any student who was a cheater or unethical. Everything I saw was straight up although of course I didn't see all the goings on. How could our views be so different?


68 people like this
Posted by Christine S
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 12, 2019 at 11:08 am

It's hard enough for hardworking students to get into top universities and now they have to compete against liars and cheaters. I'm not surprised, but so disappointed in everyone involved.


27 people like this
Posted by Chip
a resident of Professorville
on Mar 12, 2019 at 11:28 am

Will students admitted with fraudulent creds be expelled? If someone else takes your SAT test for you, it's pretty hard to claim that you "didn't know." A kid also knows whether or not he is classed as "learning disabled" and entitled to extra time.
What about the grade scandal a few years ago @ Paly? Was it really kids who hacked the system to inflate grades sent as official transcripts for applications or somebody's parent? Did the kids already matriculated under previously falsified transcripts get booted? Or maybe they'd already flunked out?


23 people like this
Posted by Dan
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 12, 2019 at 11:42 am

I guess I'm surprised at the extent of this, because it seemed so blatant. I wonder if the parents really understood what was going on. All I know is that if you make a huge donation to a school, and you then later have a kid or grandkid who wants to go there, of course the school will give them more consideration. I'm surprised these parents just didn't do it that way.


30 people like this
Posted by Michah
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 12, 2019 at 11:48 am

@6DJockery

several examples:
1. Left my calculator (we didn't have laptops then - as you know) textbook (~$69.00 to buy - which was a lot at that time) and my homework on lecture room chair fold up table to go to front to class after lecture to talk to TA about the evenings Lab. When I returned 10 min later, my book calculator and homework were all gone. They each had my name on them and none were ever returned.

2. I had a robotics lab class. The Profs goal was to build the lab capabilities with the results of student projects (software, fixtures, manipulators, etc.). To support our teams project, I built a 3'x3' aluminum worktable in the robots workspace with 1/4-20 holes spaced 1" along with alignment fiducials. Cost me about $100 for materials and a couple weeks time to cut, drill, tap, and align. At the end of class it disappeared from the lab. My lab partner and I suspected several people who had their eye on it for their own personal research activities. I later found it (after I got a tip) over in a CS robotics lab where a student insisted he had bought from another CS grad student. He refused to return it to me, even though I had etched my initials in the bottom and could prove I had made it.

3. I got a zero on a homework I knew I had turned in. The TA said there was no record of me turning in any homework and unless I had a copy of it, then the zero would stand. After the 6th week, this same thing had had happened to several others in the class and we went to the professor (who was more annoyed with us for bothering him, than by the pattern of homework theft). We insisted the professor consider that someone was changing names on homework and turning them in as their own. I always wrote my name in pen on every page after that experience. The professor never did anything.

4. I witnessed a student unplug a computer while another student was working on code for a lab class - causing him to lose hours of work.

5. I brought in a VCR and an adapter to record a computer display (relatively costly and new in those days). I stupidly left it there overnight and it was stolen.

6. During several exams, I witnessed students copying off eachother and referring to outside notes (these were closed book exams).

Need I go on ?



47 people like this
Posted by Disgusted
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 11:54 am

Elite, super expensive private high schools run similar, albeit more subtle scams, registering most if not all of their students as having "learning disabilities" so they can have extra time for SATs and using the school counselors "special relationships" to get kids into top colleges.


3 people like this
Posted by LocalParent1234
a resident of another community
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:02 pm

[Post removed.]


40 people like this
Posted by ares
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:06 pm


Just remember all the kids who got in without cheating.

Students who had to sweat out the SAT and ACT and worry about not getting into a school of their choice or at all. Who had to take AP classes and write essays and more essays for college apps.

I feel bad for the kids and hope this deters cheating and that a culture of acceptance of all schools grows - Yale, Stanford, Georgetown are not the all end be all.


10 people like this
Posted by Anonymous
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:13 pm

We are continuously lectured that certain schools, including Stanford, are “special” and desirable. Juilliard is another example of a school with a successful PR effort.
There is clear evidence of alumni network advantages (for high status internships and for high status, high-paying jobs) of certain schools like Stanford. Students are well treated at certain schools that protect the school’s image above all. High tuition is naturally a part of the equation.
Such schools naturally feed the myth that there is an absolute ranking of schools, too.
I have always said that virtually ANY school has to have merit, some strong programs and profs or they wouldn’t exist!
The sports and arts/Hollywood route to entry to undeserved offers, even full rides at these institutions is worthy of skepticism and close review. Difficult to do with Tiger Moms and money (whatever the denomination) AND most importantly, corrupt and unethical people.
I recommend associating with honest, ethical institutions.
Harvard is not exempt from cheating scandals, incidentally.....


52 people like this
Posted by Sanctimonious City
a resident of Barron Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:13 pm

The gig is up.

The global elite set up a self serving artificial barrier of false credentials to enrich themselves over the last 30 years. They then participated in a revolving door from Wall Street to Government to Silicon Valley and back again to butter their bread and create policies for siphoning the wealth from the middle class to their Gucci lined pockets.

The myth of merit, worthiness or competence has been busted. Further, the Tech Titan's coziness with Hollywood and main stream media is no coincidence.

One actor's daughter was already cashing in at Yahoo and Amazon. After graduation, I am sure she would probably have had a difficult decision on whether to take a stint at Facebook, the UN climate panel, the Mueller investigation team or Goldman Sachs.

“I don’t know how much of school I’m gonna attend,” she told her nearly 2 million subscribers, according to Yahoo News.

“But I’m gonna go in and talk to my deans and everyone, and hope that I can try and balance it all. But I do want the experience of like game days, partying... I don’t really care about school, as you guys all know.”


Web Link


26 people like this
Posted by LocalParent1234
a resident of another community
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:17 pm

Per the Department of Justice website, parents in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton and Hillsborough were named in the criminal indictment. See Web Link


50 people like this
Posted by Annette
a resident of College Terrace
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:22 pm

Annette is a registered user.

When I read stories like this I am overwhelmed with a sense of gratitude for the parents I had and the lessons they taught. Being honest was a basic. For everything. Parents who cheat to benefit their offspring do their children and society a huge disservice. At some point every student needs to perform w/o access to help from mommy and daddy. The lucky students are the ones who have legitimately earned their own way into college. The ones occupying a purchased seat are the losers. They are also usually easy to spot - both in college and afterwards in their careers.


16 people like this
Posted by sanc city - lies about 'global elite'
a resident of Green Acres
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:44 pm

[Post removed.]


32 people like this
Posted by Anonymous
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:46 pm

One Hollywood insider girl admitted to USC posted publicly on social media about wanting to speak with the deans for flexibility so she could do Hollywood stuff, mentions parting, football,, social aspect, etc. rather than academics or anything of substance. Shepherd Smith, Fox News, Noon hour today. Talk about privilege, narcissism AND over-sharing.


41 people like this
Posted by DT North
a resident of Downtown North
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:48 pm

I guess the difference is giving the $500K to the Sailing Coach instead of to the fundraising dept? Otherwise lets not kid ourselves, everyone with their name on a building gets their kid in. Cheating on the SAT is another story but more shocking to me than this story is the fact that people are shocked that wealthy people were able to pull strings to get their kids into a fancy college. You can get places with passion and hard work, but really connections and money are how the world works. Look at any job at which you've worked.


55 people like this
Posted by saddened
a resident of Stanford
on Mar 12, 2019 at 12:51 pm

Well, this is a real shame, and it does indeed show what is going on under the surface. BUT, on the other hand as a college admissions counselor myself, there are far more hardworking, honest students and parents who manage the admissions process with grace and dignity than these entitled and unprincipled folks! Stanford is NOT a school full of just these kinds of dubious legacy/athletic admits, for example. Having taught there for 34 years, I can say that the students I had were remarkably diverse, and the few I knew who did get in partly due to very famous and wealthy parents confided to me that they hoped their merits would stand on their own . These students knew they had a leg up , no question, but at the same time they were imminently qualified to attend Stanford. Nonetheless, they often felt guilty that they had won a spot. So it is not always as simple as it seems when the children of the rich and famous are admitted. I taught summer classes for athletes, and a finer group of students you truly could not ask for. No cheating. Year after year, no cheating. Disciplined, hard working, courteous, appreciative athletes in study hall every single night to keep their grades up. So while this kind of cheating and horrific behavior is going on, let us not lose sight of the fact that the majority of students and parents apply the right way! On the other hand, I am so glad that these practices are coming to light and the whole admissions process is under scrutiny. Most parents and kids are fair, and it is time to protect their spots from this kind of cheating ..


12 people like this
Posted by Frank Forunato
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 1:03 pm

Please spare the outrage. These parents are heroes for risking their reputations to help their kids.


36 people like this
Posted by Sail Guy
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 1:06 pm

I talked to Vandemoer a few years ago about two of my junior sailing kids that were very interested in a Stanford education and joining the sailing team. Both were very good sailors. He told me that academics and grade point averages were the prime requirement and athletic ability was a distant second.

Boy, do I feel stupid.


35 people like this
Posted by Cheaters
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Mar 12, 2019 at 1:12 pm

Cheaters is a registered user.

Students had to know, to some extent. How do you not know that you have a really good SAT/ACT score when you didn't take the test? What do the kids' parents tell them? Some of the cheating involved changing the test after the student took it, so maybe they weren't aware

One of the kids who had someone else take their test is a Paly senior. Does he even have a chance now of getting into college? What's his "forecast" look like now?


9 people like this
Posted by John Gladstone
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 1:18 pm

[Post removed.]


54 people like this
Posted by An SJS Spartan For Life
a resident of another community
on Mar 12, 2019 at 1:22 pm

Gee. No mention of any improprieties at San Jose State University.

Why is that...no academic pedigree or bragging rights to gain?

My brother's football coach Dave Baldwin used to drive his players to Stanford before a game (back in the day) & lecture to them..."These Stanford people think their hot stuff. They will graduate with a fancy degree, get good jobs & live easy for the rest of their lives. You guys won't...so let's go out there & kick their asses'.

A rallying cry for all SJS Spartans...as blue-collar life reality trumps the so-called 'privileged' mentality any day of the week.


27 people like this
Posted by A SJS Spartan For Life
a resident of another community
on Mar 12, 2019 at 1:41 pm

"This is the perfect intersection of helicopter parenting and the wealthy getting ahead based on money, not merit. Add in a touch of elitism..."

"Talk about privilege, narcissism..."

The Hollywood industry is premised on privilege & narcissism.

"Please spare the outrage. These parents are heroes for risking their reputations to help their kids."

Seriously or 'tongue in cheek' satire? 'Keeping up appearances' is an ongoing devotion among the truly shallow & to perpetuate the concept with subsequent offspring is genuinely disheartening.

Inequality in America can take many forms & wealth is the key to perpetuating the problem...that and a delusion of oneself.




15 people like this
Posted by Glad_I_Left
a resident of Addison School
on Mar 12, 2019 at 1:55 pm

As a former "resident", all I can say is I don't miss it. Things aren't as bad outside of the bubble within a bubble within a bubble that is life in PA.


20 people like this
Posted by jackdoe
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Mar 12, 2019 at 2:23 pm

Sad just sad. Make sure you lock these people up like you would lock up any minority that did this. Do the crime, do the time.........that goes for everybody that is breathing.


38 people like this
Posted by Chip
a resident of Professorville
on Mar 12, 2019 at 2:23 pm

Sounds as if 15K was the price for getting SAT answers corrected by a proctor after the test was given, in which case the kid may not have known. How embarrassing for any kids who really were ignorant of what the folks were doing.
Greg Colburn is a practicing physician. Will this affect his licensing status to practice?


16 people like this
Posted by Vile Disgusting People
a resident of Barron Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 2:28 pm

Pigs at the trough. I'm glad they'll be turned into bacon over this.
100% DISGUSTING and DEPLORABLE.


16 people like this
Posted by caroline vertongen
a resident of Portola Valley
on Mar 12, 2019 at 2:29 pm

This news came at the right time and is huge.
This scandal is only the beginning of the huge networking among local government officials, government employees, board members, and many government funded non-profit organizations promoting their self interests, the political agenda, and voting power.
First the Ivy league - Stanford and soon to follow : the California public education system under CSU Chancellor White, UC President Napolitano, and former State Superintendent Torlaksen....


This is a victory for so many of us, American citizens residing and working in California who have been retaliated against for disclosing the abusive, fraudulent, illegal, and criminal conduct that is being taught, promoted and covered up in our education and healthcare system. Our elected officials former Governor Brown, former State Superintendent Torlaksen, San Mateo and Santa Clara school board officials , Congresswomen Eshoo, Congresswoman Lofgren, Congresswoman Speier and former Congressman Honda; Senator Hill, former Assembly member Gordon, Assemblymember Berman and Assembly member Mullen, Senator Feinstein, former Attorney General Harris (now Senator Harris) and Attorney General Becerra, San Mateo and Santa Clara Board of Supervisors, as well as District Attorney Rosen and District Attorney Wagstaffe ...all have known the abusive, fraudulent, illegal and criminal conduct that is being taught and promoted. All have helped defer the required investigations, helped the cover up with false advertisement, paid "experts" denying any wrongdoing, and helped expand the huge networking among government officials, government employees and the zillion non-profit organizations .....


The truth always wins.....


4 people like this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Mar 12, 2019 at 2:48 pm

Antidote to "impostor syndrome".


24 people like this
Posted by Smug
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 2:52 pm

It's shocking and sad but these few people don't take away from the - literally - hudnreds of thousands of students across the country who get into college honestly. And, it's not an indictment (as many of you here seem to think) of the schools themselves from what I've read here and elsewhere. It's about a few bad actors in an enormous system. What I'm not surprised at is that a few on this forum have taken this story as an opportunity to "trash" Stanford and make gross generalizations about parents and students. @Michah - really? You're going to generalize your personal experience and say it's indicative of the entire school? An MSSE? Masters in Science? Education? Systems? Surely you learned about number of data points needed before any conclusions can be drawn? I started my college career out at an Ivy League on the East Coast. I had a horrible experience on every level and left after one semester. Did I trash the school? No. Did I dissuade a nephew from applying (and attending) 30 years later? No. Bad things happen. Let's be glad this scam was caught. And, let's not take away from those students, parents, teachers, institutions, etc. who are honest and hardworking.


12 people like this
Posted by UC Davis Aggie For Life
a resident of Mountain View
on Mar 12, 2019 at 3:03 pm

@An SJS Spartan For Life -- I guess the "elite" have no idea that you can get a great education from a school that is not "elite" (although UC Davis is getting quite the reputation these days).

But let's keep that knowledge to ourselves, shall we? *wink wink*


36 people like this
Posted by Sanctimonious City
a resident of Barron Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 3:18 pm

Oh, there is much more college admissions folly deserving of our collective melancholy. Below are just a few of the matriculation blues:

1. Alleged racial discrimination by Harvard against imagined but never interviewed personality traits of Asians
2. Possible Title IX discrimination at Cornell against males even though they are a minority group, hold lower GPA averages as students and are under-represented in key fields like Medicine, Biology and Social Sciences. Web Link
3. The use of zip codes as a likely unconstitutional proxy for enforcing racial affirmative action quotas in admissions
4. The reliance on a business model requiring between 20% to 25% international and out of state students to pay for a bloated administrative staff in the diversity and XXX-studies departments
5. The requirement for political statements in the form of essays proving support for politically correct ideologies
6. The prioritization of illegal immigrants over citizens by using "1st generation college students" as a thinly veiled camouflage
7. Limiting the capacity model so that resident families who have paid property taxes for 20+ years are forced to send their children out of state or take six years to graduate due to lack of classes

This list contains enough credentialed class sorrow to last until tomorrow.

Until then, pass the hanky.


7 people like this
Posted by Diana C
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 12, 2019 at 3:24 pm

This event is a awaken of our society to not judge or value people just because they go to these elite schools. Having a college degree with elite school is a personal achievement but it’s not a trophy nor guarantees the future of this individual. Wealthy people also just re-evaluate their moral values to contribute more to the society to help less fortunate with their wealth to have a better community at large not use the money to buy what they want to have like college degree, big house or political influences for their own benefits. There is nothing wrong for being successful and famous but it is wrong to not have moral values.


23 people like this
Posted by mauricio
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Mar 12, 2019 at 3:34 pm

mauricio is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


10 people like this
Posted by Carrie
a resident of another community
on Mar 12, 2019 at 3:35 pm

When my now 25 year old daughter was as Paly, I remember a college consultant offering guaranteed admission to Ivy of your choice for $1 million. Anyone else remember this or know if it was the same scam?


21 people like this
Posted by William Ferguson
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 3:51 pm

How is this any different from parents paying well into 7 or even 8 figures to buy a house in places like Palo Alto so their children can have advantages that other children from less fortunate circumstances will never have? This is just taking the current system and exposing its inequity by pushing it to its logical extreme.


18 people like this
Posted by Chelsea
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 12, 2019 at 3:56 pm

So what else is new? No further comment.


7 people like this
Posted by Bruce Singleton
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 4:01 pm

[Post removed.]


17 people like this
Posted by Coach Jenkins
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Mar 12, 2019 at 4:06 pm

The moral of the story is that coaches for the minor sports are underpaid. You don't see any college football coaches taking bribes from this outfit.


10 people like this
Posted by GlennW
a resident of Woodside
on Mar 12, 2019 at 4:11 pm

I have dinner in LA with old friends every year and we all agree that we couldn't have gotten into our alma mater schools (CalTech, Ivies, UCLA) today because the acceptance rates have gone so far down. There seems to be either not enough of the better schools (few new ones), or the best ones have refused to expand (understandable). Such low acceptance means people of privilege are going to look for loopholes. It used to be legacy-coupled donations but now they have found the athletic team loophole. But where are the unfound loopholes? All that extra curricular activity that Stanford loves to see in applicants---do they test if it actually happened? Stanford, USC and UCLA are big sports schools, so I can imagine that lots of applicants might be fudging things.....to get admitted, not to get on the teams. More scrutiny is certainly needed.


10 people like this
Posted by Da Clintons did it
a resident of Stanford
on Mar 12, 2019 at 4:22 pm

[Post removed.]


7 people like this
Posted by What Will They Do Next
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 12, 2019 at 4:23 pm

What Will They Do Next is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


40 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Downtown North
on Mar 12, 2019 at 4:39 pm

I hope all the students who cheated their way into these colleges are immediately expelled. Do not reward cheaters!

The real victims of this cheating are the underprivileged students who earned a right to attend these colleges but were cheated out of their places. Will they ever be personally notified?


61 people like this
Posted by Member
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 12, 2019 at 4:54 pm

Lol! You would waste 6.5 million just to say your child went to an elite college? Why not just give your child 6.5 million and tell him to have a nice life!!


7 people like this
Posted by Wholly Molley
a resident of Barron Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 5:16 pm

[Post removed.]


5 people like this
Posted by m2grs
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 12, 2019 at 5:18 pm

[Post removed.]


38 people like this
Posted by Vincent Van GoghFundMe
a resident of Green Acres
on Mar 12, 2019 at 5:20 pm

Truth be told, the private universities have been soliciting bribes from parents all along - in the form of exorbitant tuition.


25 people like this
Posted by What Will They Do Next
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 12, 2019 at 5:28 pm

What Will They Do Next is a registered user.

@ resident. There are plenty of students who were and are being cheated out of places in these colleges who aren't necessarily underprivileged. Many are victims of reverse discrimination, whereby less qualified students, many of whom are minorities, are accepted to improve the "diversity" profile of these so called "elite" schools.

As an example, Harvard has notoriously discriminated against Jews and Asians even though they may not be underprivileged, but meet and exceed entry requirements academically and otherwise. The truth is the truth and it hurts sometimes.


35 people like this
Posted by GrandmaKK
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 12, 2019 at 5:47 pm

While studying for his PhD at Stanford, my husband and I knew of students who used the parent’s wealth to get into the grad school of their choice. This wasn’t using anything as organized as the scheme described in this article. Much simpler - Daddy showed up for an appointment with a dean, and shortly after, said student had a place in grad school. There was one friend who kept reminding school authorities that as a wealthy foreign student, her tuition was paid in full by family with no help from the University. She got two degrees from Stanford.

When my husband subsequently taught at a very large midwestern public university, he turned in a student for cheating. The faculty didn’t want to know about it. They refused to do anything. When husband’s review came up, he was turned down for tenure.

It doesn’t happen only at the “prestigious” schools and not always in an organized fashion. A bulging envelope speaks in many languages.


1 person likes this
Posted by What Will They Do Next
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 12, 2019 at 5:53 pm

What Will They Do Next is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


5 people like this
Posted by MP
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 12, 2019 at 6:03 pm

SAP test + "achievements" list are bad criteria for getting the best into University education.
For non-Art, there should be oral and written (not multiply choice!) exams upon finishing High School, and upon college entry (based on what is intended subject: math/physics etc or chemistry/biology or language/history/literature)


18 people like this
Posted by Disgusted
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 6:09 pm

It is well known that Harvard and probably other top universities reserve seats for people making large donations. According to this article (Web Link) Jared Kushner's father pledged $2.5 million to Harvard when Jared was still in prep school and Jared and his younger sibling both got in. Interestingly it appears the Stanford sailing coach did not take any money personally but enabled fraudulant admissions to fund the Stanford sailing program just as Harvard let in non-competitive applicants in order to fund their university. Neither of these actions are at all cool.


20 people like this
Posted by Smart enough to run a nuclear plant?
a resident of Evergreen Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 6:10 pm

[Post removed.]


2 people like this
Posted by What Will They Do Next
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 12, 2019 at 6:19 pm

What Will They Do Next is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


16 people like this
Posted by Sail Guy
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 6:21 pm

From the Huffington Post

"In an October 2018 phone call, Singer informed (a parent) that Stanford’s sailing coach could get a spot for one of his daughters but not the other “because he has to actually recruit some real sailors so that Stanford doesn’t catch on.”


29 people like this
Posted by m2grs
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 12, 2019 at 7:17 pm

Higher Ed has an article on this and quoted the master mind. Basically he said there are three doors to an elite school: the front door, the back door and the side dooor. If the student is strong he or she can go through the front door. If the family is super rich or powerful the student can go through the back door.

He is an expert on the side door. The bribe door. It seems that this door is for those families that are not rich enough to use the back door. The “middle class” LOL.

DOJ will never dare to challenge the back door.


13 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Downtown North
on Mar 12, 2019 at 7:33 pm

[Post removed.]


24 people like this
Posted by Jase
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 12, 2019 at 7:53 pm

The 1% have always played by different rules. Always have, always will. But hopefully a few of them will be ruthlessly exposed (every now and then) by that thing we call the internet.


19 people like this
Posted by Anonymous
a resident of another community
on Mar 12, 2019 at 7:59 pm

The sad thing in all this to me is that these parents were so invested in getting their children into elite colleges..as if that is such an important objective. But why?? I know people who went to all types of schools and it really doesn't matter in the long run. There are some amazing smaller private schools out there or less competitive public schools. I know people who went to elite schools and are unhappy and those that attended state colleges and are making six or seven figure salaries. Most people don't care all that much where you went to school as long as you can demonstrate solid work ethic and prove yourself. If you go to an elite school and then get hired for a job but don't perform up to expectations you will develop a bad reputation anyway. What's most important in life is being a good person, developing relationships, and people skills. That will get you SO MUCH MORE out of life than attending an elite college. And at the end of the day, if those kids were so determined, they always had the option of working really hard to get into an elite graduate school program. What a waste of time and money these parents put in, for something that really wasn't worth it.


53 people like this
Posted by JR
a resident of Palo Verde
on Mar 12, 2019 at 8:01 pm

Stanford is not a school, it's a hedge fund that is run for-profit. They collect millions of dollars in "donations" and then refuse to pay the school district to educate their own kids. I guess we now know why they refused to admit Palo Alto's own Jeremy Lin? This is sickening.


32 people like this
Posted by What Will They Do Next
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 12, 2019 at 8:04 pm

What Will They Do Next is a registered user.

Why not let people comment? Removing posts because they are not politically correct (conservative viewpoints) is sadly pathetic.


20 people like this
Posted by Anneke
a resident of Professorville
on Mar 12, 2019 at 8:09 pm

Stanford and parents who got involved in this corruption.....how low can you go? Yesterday, the drinking....today, the cheating to get into college. So very, very sad.


13 people like this
Posted by Stanford didn't admit these kids
a resident of Stanford
on Mar 12, 2019 at 8:52 pm

Yes, this cheat ring is appalling and I thank the FBI for breaking the case open.

To those of you slamming Stanford: he first student the Stanford sailing coach pushed on admissions was denied. The second one never completed the application.

here is the link:

Web Link


16 people like this
Posted by Jim
a resident of Professorville
on Mar 12, 2019 at 8:52 pm

All of the universities mentioned are honorable institutions that have educated countless honest and hard working students. Some provide world class education at no cost to lower income students. I am shocked at how many online comments use the criminal behavior of a few bad actors as an excuse to trash Stanford and the other fine colleges that had nothing to do with the scam described.


49 people like this
Posted by Mandatory Expulsion
a resident of Los Altos
on Mar 12, 2019 at 9:03 pm

And now the next question is...shouldn't those undeserving students whose admissions were fraudulently concocted be EXPELLED?



17 people like this
Posted by Anonymous
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Mar 12, 2019 at 9:14 pm

It’s a small, recent sample but...Stanford employed a corrupt sailing team coach and a preposterous assistant admissions director who had the worst possible judgement as in...held now up in SF on a no bail for allegedly violently assaulting a woman. Maybe they should be more discerning in their staff hires. This current cheating scandal does not refer to academic faculty as far as we know but....remember the dean of the Stanford Law School and his shenanigans several years ago with two divorcing law faculty? I don’t agree with workplace affairs.
Meanwhile, why isn’t William H. Macy indicted when according to news reports he’s taped on phone calls(s) indicating complicity with this pretend donating to a “charity” and getting a tax deduction, which was really payola to get his daughters into USC?


3 people like this
Posted by Wholly Molley
a resident of Barron Park
on Mar 12, 2019 at 9:21 pm

[Post removed.]


18 people like this
Posted by shane246
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 12, 2019 at 9:23 pm

poor middle class parents. couldn't afford to buy a building at Stanford. so had to resort to cheating & bribing.


43 people like this
Posted by GoKnights
a resident of Atherton
on Mar 12, 2019 at 9:29 pm

There were the learning disability tricks some Atherton parents played to gain unfair advantages for their kids. IN a top private school in Atherton there were Atherton-based students with "learning disabilities" thus always took more time to do the same tests as other students, gaining unfair advantages over other hard-working students. Some of these students got into east coast ivies (H) as sportsrecruits.


12 people like this
Posted by realistic
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 12, 2019 at 9:30 pm

It makes sense that there's little to no outrage/surprise about parents giving their kids a leg up in the admissions process; this was just an awful way of going about it. Take a look at all the Palo Alto students who got into top private schools.

Most of the applicants to these schools are probably smart, so admissions officers will strongly take external factors into consideration. That could be donations, legacy/connections to officials at the school, or parental employment at the school. I'd say legacy and connections go hand-in-hand. Sure, there are a select few who are smart enough without any connections. But the majority of students who make it into these prestigious private schools didn't make it entirely on their own merit.

Look at the Paly High School College Map and think about where each student's parents went to school. You'll see a pattern there.


38 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Downtown North
on Mar 12, 2019 at 10:04 pm

@realistic - maybe the majority of white students use their parent's money and connections to get admitted, but I bet the majority of non-white students get in on their own merits, often because their parents don't have the money or connections. Basing college admissions on money and connections is one way to oppress the non-white citizens of this country.


25 people like this
Posted by Honest parent
a resident of Greenmeadow
on Mar 12, 2019 at 10:09 pm

Stanford president should resign. That would show integrity. He failed to run an honest program. Leaders take the fall when they screw up.


10 people like this
Posted by Stephen
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Mar 12, 2019 at 11:02 pm

To "Anonymous" - sorry to say you don't really know whereof you are speaking re any Stanford Law dean. It was the dean of the business school (whose wife was dying and then died) who was involved with a tenured faculty member who was in the middle of a divorce from her husband who was a non-tenure line teaching professor. It all became public when the woman's husband became upset because he was asked to choose between continuing at Stanford and thus ending his leave (he was working at Apple for a substantially larger salary than he received at Stanford) or no longer being affiliated with Stanford since Stanford's policy is one of limiting leave to no more than 2 years in a row. See Web Link


22 people like this
Posted by Happy
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 13, 2019 at 12:43 am

This does not surprise me one bit. Such elitism and arrogance on the part of parents in this part of the world...ridiculous. They breed this in their children, foster pathetic viewpoints(self-centered) and sense of entitlement. SO GLAD this is exposed but it is only the tip of the iceberg, right Paly faculty and parents?the cheaters should all be expelled and good luck getting in somewhere else.


20 people like this
Posted by What Will They Do Next
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Mar 13, 2019 at 7:43 am

What Will They Do Next is a registered user.

@ resident....many non-white students earn their way into good colleges based on their own merit. So do most white students. It is fair to say that many non-white students (exclusive of Asians) get into so called prestigious colleges and universities because they are non-white and raise the diversity profile of these schools. Entrance standards are lowered to accommodate this group at the expense of more academically qualified white and Asian students. The parents of many of these white/Asian students don't have the money or connections for easy admission either. This has been going on for a longer time than most want to admit. Let's be honest.


8 people like this
Posted by III
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 13, 2019 at 9:18 am

Sadly nothing surprises me anymore.
Mexico will pay for the wall. Now 6 months later, nobody says a peep.
Athletes being paid to come to a particular school. Happens today.
Buying and selling of human parts/organs.
This is nothing new and I suspect tip of the overall iceberg.
I have no problem with coaching and providing a service to help students to use the correct wording and experience to be noted higher than another applicant by school administration. If higher net worth family can afford this. Ok with me. Cheating by lies/similar on application/resume this upsets and depresses me. Did not know how rampant it was though.
Not to mention, if you are smart and hard worker, use connections, etc. Getting a job is not always D1 college vs D3 college only club. IMO.
AND proven over and over and over: A students teach and the B students work for the C grade students :-------)
III


11 people like this
Posted by Broken values.
a resident of Greenmeadow
on Mar 13, 2019 at 11:45 am

This is terrible for the children of these people and for other children who earned these spots and did not get selected. What are these abusive parents teaching children?

#1-- To their own child, "I don't believe that you have the talent to be successful on your own merits with hard work, so I will help you cheat."

#2-- To get ahead in this world you must cheat.

They are educating their own children that they do not have worth as individuals. They are incenting all kids to behave as criminals.

These people are corporate leaders? Jail time might help these parents/corporate leaders grow up a little and set an example for other parents who might be considering doing this. These parents do not have a clue how to build healthy environments where people help each other work to their best individual potential to serve society. What kind of society and work environments do we want? Do the values expressed in this behavior support healthy corporate, family and community life?

People who behave this way do not deserve leadership roles. Society (and businesses) are built on values. The values of their leaders matter a lot. Their companies should fire them all. This is seriously toxic behavior.

As my kids make their way through college, though not top-tier colleges, I am proud of them and their hard work. It is clear to me that they are getting excellent educations--though not a Harvard pedigree--which may not mean so much--especially in light of this news. It breaks my heart to see young people treated this way by talented but corrupt parents.

Send these parents to jail. This is fraud. It is also child abuse. Make an example of them. As for the kids--they should probably be invited to leave college with zero accrued credits and apply again elsewhere using their own high school accomplishments on their applications like the rest of the kids. They should be monitored in this activity by someone other than their own parents who have demonstrated that they are incapable of guiding any child (or corporate entity) honestly.




3 people like this
Posted by Bullis Payments
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 13, 2019 at 1:25 pm

[Post removed.]


8 people like this
Posted by jh
a resident of Evergreen Park
on Mar 13, 2019 at 1:28 pm

jh is a registered user.

"What a waste of time and money these parents put in, for something that really wasn't worth it."

Perhaps as much as anything for the parents who are willing to lie and cheat, and teach their own child to do so, this reflects their own need for "bragging rights" to feed their own egos.

But then again, when Stanford looks kindly on the children of those who make large donations, perhaps to some it doesn't seem so unfair to buy a spot for your child. However, makes you wonder how much these same parents have lied and cheated to get where they are.


16 people like this
Posted by AlexDeLarge
a resident of Midtown
on Mar 13, 2019 at 3:35 pm


'Better call Saul...


16 people like this
Posted by Mission Impossible
a resident of Gunn High School
on Mar 13, 2019 at 9:21 pm

It starts well before college around Palo Alto and other communities.
It’s evident in PAUSD and MP with the families close to / friends with school leaders and families making bigger contributions getting preferred teachers and class placement, making the team etc. Only natural for the families to keep wanting that extra boost. Too bad it can come down to cheating.

I applaud those that don’t pull strings, that don’t get too involved.


1 person likes this
Posted by An Example of Affirmative Action
a resident of another community
on Mar 14, 2019 at 3:32 pm

It's Affirmative Action for those who who do not meet admission standards but can afford to pay the tuition cost + a gratuity


4 people like this
Posted by Entitled kids=dysfunctional adults
a resident of another community
on Mar 14, 2019 at 4:01 pm

I know some very successful people,from working class backgrounds, who wirjed their way through San Jose State. But when you suggest their own kids might do the same, they look at you like you are insane. These pampered entitled kids are going to become dysfunctional audults with an inflated opinion of themselves. [Portion removed.]


10 people like this
Posted by PALY Parent
a resident of Barron Park
on Mar 14, 2019 at 7:38 pm

You know this is just the TIP of the iceberg. Hundreds of other families will be shamed, and I am sure many of them are from Palo Alto.

So incredibly sad.
I am not sure why I was am so shocked, but I am.
And honestly, I am angry for our kids who work so hard -- and still feel like they are unsuccessful with B.

I can't wait until our child is finished with PALY. It is an unhealthy place to be if you are not a top student.. or, if now, your parents didn't buy their way to perfect SAT scores.


7 people like this
Posted by Parent
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Mar 15, 2019 at 1:19 am

Lots of families pay tutors who help “too much,” have parents writing their kid’s essays and doing their science projects for them, and pay a LOT of money to college consultants and SAT tutors. The deck is stacked before the application process even begins.

Hopefully the colleges across the country will finally realize what they have created and change their admissions practices.

In the meantime, it’s hard to tell parents to ‘just let your kid be’ and ‘let them own the process’ when all your friends and neighbors are promoting their kids to every extent possible. I do hope that those in our community who have done similar illegal things to get their kids into college are all quaking in their boots right now and I hope they all get caught.

GkTo all the current seniors who have earned their own grades and test scores, take heart: I have a feeling that some additional spots are about to open up at many of these colleges...


1 person likes this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Mar 15, 2019 at 1:57 am

These people must see great value here. Can we find a way to tax this?


3 people like this
Posted by DuvMon
a resident of Crescent Park
on Mar 15, 2019 at 1:21 pm

Based on some of these comments: Russia did it!


9 people like this
Posted by A College Drop Out
a resident of another community
on Mar 15, 2019 at 1:29 pm

The complicit parents are seeking a vicarious experience...bragging rights & reliving the college experience which is highly over-rated.

They are pathetic souls with fat wallets...who never evolved.


Posted by Name hidden
a resident of Barron Park

on Mar 15, 2019 at 10:17 pm

Due to repeated violations of our Terms of Use, comments from this poster are automatically removed. Why?


Like this comment
Posted by JM
a resident of Mountain View
on Mar 16, 2019 at 1:12 am

[Post removed.]


7 people like this
Posted by dianajill
a resident of Nixon School
on Mar 16, 2019 at 9:06 am

dianajill is a registered user.

Recent revelations about parents who cheat to gain college admission for their children at "elite" colleges, sugar-coat the parents' motivations by saying that every parent wants what's best for their child. It's more likely that these parents want the status of being able to brag about their brilliant child who got into x-university. A high-powered elite institution is NOT the best option for most undergraduates.

There are many excellent, small, liberal arts colleges that focus on undergraduate education. The professors know their students personally and are available to counsel with them. The students integrate easily into student life. We need the big research universities to train our future innovators and leaders, but they're for the mature, dedicated, graduate student, not the young, over-parented, uncertain undergrad.


1 person likes this
Posted by Susan
a resident of Downtown North
on Mar 17, 2019 at 8:13 pm

How sad that the kids who really work hard and want to go to college can't because they are honest and intelligent. I hope the parents and their kids plus the coaches and all the other nasty dishonest people get thrown in prison. This will teach the wealthy and dishonest people cannot and should not get away with what they did.


9 people like this
Posted by Dontrelle
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Mar 18, 2019 at 8:20 pm

No African-Americans were indicted, only rich white people. No Asian either.

Couldn't help but notice.


9 people like this
Posted by Fact check
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 18, 2019 at 8:53 pm

@Dontrelle

I don't know if no Asian was indicted, but one of the indicted persons is named I-Hsin "Joey" Chen.

One is named Gamal Abdelaziz, and another one Homayoun Zadeh.

Draw your own conclusions.


9 people like this
Posted by Fact check
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 18, 2019 at 8:59 pm

@Dontrelle

Furthermore, at least one of the indicted coaches, Rudolph Meredith, us African American.


2 people like this
Posted by Dontrelle
a resident of East Palo Alto
6 hours ago

@Dontrelle

...one of the indicted persons is named I-Hsin "Joey" Chen.

One is named Gamal Abdelaziz, and another one Homayoun Zadeh.

Furthermore, at least one of the indicted coaches, Rudolph Meredith, us African American.

Draw your own conclusions.


OK. One Chinese person, two Middle Easterners & one African American = 4 out of how many indicted or under investigation?

Gives a whole new meaning to minority-related crime.


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