News

Ceremony honoring emergency volunteers marks 10 years

Palo Alto/Stanford Citizen Corps Council to recognize three individuals, two organizations

Three residents and two organizations will receive honors for their work to prepare the community for an emergency this Thursday during the Palo Alto/Stanford Citizen Corps Council's 2018 Community Partnership Awards.

This is the 10th anniversary of the awards, which have been given out annually by the Palo Alto/Stanford Citizen Corps Council, a coalition of city officials and community activists leading the city's disaster-preparation efforts. Neighborhood preparedness coordinator Sharon Elliot, longtime Community Emergency Response Team member Al Dorsky and Amy Yang, who recently led a city emergency awareness fair, will be honored for their individual contributions. Ellen Corman, representing Stanford Health Care's Stop the Bleed Program, and Zack Bodner, representing Palo Alto's Oshman Family Jewish Community Center where he serves as CEO, will be this year's agency and business awardees, respectively.

The annual event open to the public will include opening remarks by Palo Alto City Manager Ed Shikada and emergency services team leader Annette Glanckopf. It will also include keynote remarks by Chris Godley, director of emergency management in Sonoma County, who will then join followed by a panel discussion titled, "It Could Happen Here: Floods, Fires, Earthquakes." Godley will be joined by Palo Alto's Office of Emergency Services Director Ken Dueker and interim Fire Chief Geoffrey Blackshire. Police Chief Robert Jonsen will give closing remarks.

The JCC will be honored for its efforts to improve emergency resilience at the Taube Koret Campus, a roughly 9-acre area that includes the Moldaw Family Residences retirement community, a large athletic complex and educational facilities for children, Glanckopf said in an email. The JCC has conducted an annual disaster exercise as part of its all-hands staff day for the past three years, with scenarios ranging from child abduction to active shooters.

"The JCC has been a great partner to the city's public safety departments and now intends to become involved in the Emergency Services Volunteer program," Glanckopf said.

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Stop the Bleed is a national program designed to train civilian bystanders to render aid to people injured in mass-casualty incidents, including explosions, active shooter events or natural disasters. Stanford Health Care offers the course through its community-outreach programs.

"Similar to prior efforts with CPR, Stop the Bleed is a one-hour program for all members of the community that teaches how to control bleeding and trauma while waiting for first responders to arrive," Glanckopf said.

The free event will take place on Thursday, Jan. 17, at 6:30 p.m. at the Mitchell Park Community Center El Palo Alto Room, 3700 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. It will begin with a reception and is followed by the welcome address and awards presentation at 7 p.m. The keynote and panel discussion will take place from 7:30-9 p.m.

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Ceremony honoring emergency volunteers marks 10 years

Palo Alto/Stanford Citizen Corps Council to recognize three individuals, two organizations

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Tue, Jan 15, 2019, 9:42 am

Three residents and two organizations will receive honors for their work to prepare the community for an emergency this Thursday during the Palo Alto/Stanford Citizen Corps Council's 2018 Community Partnership Awards.

This is the 10th anniversary of the awards, which have been given out annually by the Palo Alto/Stanford Citizen Corps Council, a coalition of city officials and community activists leading the city's disaster-preparation efforts. Neighborhood preparedness coordinator Sharon Elliot, longtime Community Emergency Response Team member Al Dorsky and Amy Yang, who recently led a city emergency awareness fair, will be honored for their individual contributions. Ellen Corman, representing Stanford Health Care's Stop the Bleed Program, and Zack Bodner, representing Palo Alto's Oshman Family Jewish Community Center where he serves as CEO, will be this year's agency and business awardees, respectively.

The annual event open to the public will include opening remarks by Palo Alto City Manager Ed Shikada and emergency services team leader Annette Glanckopf. It will also include keynote remarks by Chris Godley, director of emergency management in Sonoma County, who will then join followed by a panel discussion titled, "It Could Happen Here: Floods, Fires, Earthquakes." Godley will be joined by Palo Alto's Office of Emergency Services Director Ken Dueker and interim Fire Chief Geoffrey Blackshire. Police Chief Robert Jonsen will give closing remarks.

The JCC will be honored for its efforts to improve emergency resilience at the Taube Koret Campus, a roughly 9-acre area that includes the Moldaw Family Residences retirement community, a large athletic complex and educational facilities for children, Glanckopf said in an email. The JCC has conducted an annual disaster exercise as part of its all-hands staff day for the past three years, with scenarios ranging from child abduction to active shooters.

"The JCC has been a great partner to the city's public safety departments and now intends to become involved in the Emergency Services Volunteer program," Glanckopf said.

Stop the Bleed is a national program designed to train civilian bystanders to render aid to people injured in mass-casualty incidents, including explosions, active shooter events or natural disasters. Stanford Health Care offers the course through its community-outreach programs.

"Similar to prior efforts with CPR, Stop the Bleed is a one-hour program for all members of the community that teaches how to control bleeding and trauma while waiting for first responders to arrive," Glanckopf said.

The free event will take place on Thursday, Jan. 17, at 6:30 p.m. at the Mitchell Park Community Center El Palo Alto Room, 3700 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. It will begin with a reception and is followed by the welcome address and awards presentation at 7 p.m. The keynote and panel discussion will take place from 7:30-9 p.m.

Comments

ANNETTE
Midtown
on Jan 18, 2019 at 10:02 am
ANNETTE, Midtown
on Jan 18, 2019 at 10:02 am
Like this comment

It was an amazing evening with a very sobering message.
Great job done by all.


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