News

Fight against gun violence comes to Stanford campus

Group seeks to declare gun violence as a public health crisis

Several medical school students and faculty members wore blue scrubs and pins with the "Safe" logo in support of an effort by medical schools across the country to classify gun violence as a public health crisis during a rally at Stanford University on Sept. 17, 2018. Photo by Veronica Weber.

The fight against gun violence reached the Stanford University campus on Monday afternoon, when about 300 people rallied to establish the growing problem as a public health crisis.

Doctors, nurses, medical students and other medical staff gathered at the Dean's Lawn as the clock struck noon holding signs, a few that read "Doctors demand action!" and "Fewer guns safer children!"

The gathering was one of many across the country organized by Stand Safe (Scrubs Addressing the Firearm Epidemic), an organization founded by Stanford University medical student Sarabeth Spitzer and Dr. Dean Winslow, a professor. The group aims to fund research on gun safety, train doctors to counsel at-risk populations in clinics and hospitals on firearms, and support "evidence-based policy that promotes responsible gun ownership," among other goals.

"As medical students being trained to protect our patients' physical and mental health and wellbeing, we were struck by the lack of medical education available on such a devastating and important issue," Spitzer said in a statement. "With each mass shooting covered in the news, we watched, wondering what we could do to prevent such a loss of life."

Winslow, a retired U.S. Air Force colonel, saw the effects assault weapons have on people while he was a flight surgeon in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he served six deployments after 9/11.

"These are weapons designed for the battlefield. Easy access to these same types of weapons in the U.S. has resulted in dozens of horrific mass shootings - and handguns cause the deaths of at least 20 veterans each day by suicide," Winslow said in a statement.

The rally was followed by a panel discussion with faculty members and medical students who discussed how firearms are a public health problem and a "Stop the Bleed" training session.

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Comments

21 people like this
Posted by Alex
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Sep 17, 2018 at 4:51 pm

I’m 60. Growing up you could walk out to the high school parking lot and see rifles hanging in back windows of pickup trucks. Guns were displayed in glass cases in your relatives or friends homes. No one thought about using them to hurt or kill another person. What changed? One for one thing, no one takes responsibility for their actions and blames others. Social media has made mass shooters famous within minutes. It’s not the guns , it’s the change in our society. The mental health of our society needs to be the number one priority in trying to prevent these shootings.


2 people like this
Posted by Concerned Resident
a resident of Crescent Park
on Sep 17, 2018 at 5:06 pm

> What changed?

Kids apparently vent in a different manner these days. Unchecked bullying has something to do with it as well.


34 people like this
Posted by parent
a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 17, 2018 at 6:09 pm

I heard the NRA say that Botham Jean could still be alive if he had armed himself when his home was invaded. With logic like that getting the President's ear, I don't expect any changes to our national gun culture anytime soon.


2 people like this
Posted by Cadet of deferment
a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 17, 2018 at 7:05 pm

Listening to Cadet Bone Spurs about guns is an exercise in futility.


16 people like this
Posted by Cadet of deferment
a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 17, 2018 at 7:07 pm

Listen to facts, not to the orange man - guns in the home are 11 times more likely to harm loved ones than an intruder.


4 people like this
Posted by Chris Zaharias
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 18, 2018 at 7:43 am

Chris Zaharias is a registered user.

The best way to reduce gun violence is to seek out, embrace, understand and help thrive those among us who struggle with depression and anxiety. The SF Bay Area--and Silicon Valley in particular--have become strange, abnormal places to grow up, live and work in; IMHO, anxiety and depression are normal reactions to our abnormal environment.

As someone who's struggled with A&D since childhood, I can't tell you how much it helps when people put aside judgement and instead show understanding and compassion.


52 people like this
Posted by NRA Member
a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 18, 2018 at 9:59 am

As a long-time NRA member and outdoorsman, I often find myself at odds with the organization's overall platform that guns should essentially be unrestricted.

Not true by any means as a commitment to firearm safety and responsibility should be its first and foremost priority. Unfortunately, the majority of NRA membership still cling to a group-oriented paranoia of sorts...that they are going to lose their American way of life if not suitably armed to take out any perceived or imagined enemies who wish to deprive them of their inherent rights as US citizens.

Thus the advanced technology of modern rapid-fire weaponry keeps them one step ahead or on an even keel with any perceived threats. An absurd argument in that even a well-placed single shot from a ball and powder musket can be deadly on its own accord. That's all that existed at the time the 2nd Amendment was drafted as the founding fathers did not envision the eventual development of semi-automatic and fully automatic firearms.

The further development of firearms was primarily designed to kill more humans at a faster rate during warfare and periods of land (i.e. westward and colonial) expansion.

There is also a dysfunctional 'macho' element at play for those who worship fully automatic weaponry and many of them shouldn't even be allowed to hold a cap pistol.

Needless to say, I am not renewing my NRA membership for 2019 but intend to keep my two Winchester Model 73/93 30-30s for deer season.



20 people like this
Posted by Cadet of deferment
a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 18, 2018 at 10:58 am

Chris - all good. List 9 actions to improve mental health that gun nuts will support, please.

Kindly leave space for 1 item at the top of the list of actions that will reduce gun violence.

You have items 2 thru 10, to reduce gun violence. I'll just add a single action to make your list complete:

1. Reduce the number of guns
2. Chris' actions
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Great team work, thanks!!


14 people like this
Posted by Joyce
a resident of Stanford
on Sep 18, 2018 at 11:16 am

In Texas, many of the patients who are treated for psychotic breakdowns have guns in their homes. The psychiatrists who treat them are not allowed to inform anyone (not even family) about the fact that the patients they are treating have guns in their homes. They often see these patients again and again, as they get off their meds and end up in the ER with psychotic breakdowns. The med students, residents and doctors can ask them if they have a gun in their homes. Most say yes because this is Texas. This information can be noted in the chart, but not shared with anyone.
It would be great if someone did a study to collect statistics on this patient population.


4 people like this
Posted by Trevor in Texas
a resident of another community
on Sep 18, 2018 at 2:24 pm

Re: Cadet of deferment
1. “Reduce the number of guns” in the hand of the wrong people by #’s 2, 4, 5
2. Allow mental health doctors to report those being treated with severe issues, not ALL doctors on ALL patients.
3. Re-vamp health care for veterans
4. Make states to report to NICS rather than “in-house”
5. Enforce laws
6. Stop making criminals victims
7. Tougher actions on school bullying
8. Stop dividing the Nation socially and racially
9. Learn respect for others
10. Reciprocity


24 people like this
Posted by Guns for Freedom
a resident of another community
on Sep 18, 2018 at 6:30 pm

The sign of a repressive society is one where only the military and police are allowed to carry firearms.

Look around the world and you will comprehend this observation.

On the other hand, not everyone should be allowed to have them.


28 people like this
Posted by Silly
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Sep 18, 2018 at 8:45 pm

Britain. Germany. Sweden. Japan. Australia. France. On and on.

All repressive.

Yeah, right.

Guns in the house are ten times more likely to kill and injure than self defense.


28 people like this
Posted by Long/Short Gun at Home
a resident of Fairmeadow
on Sep 19, 2018 at 8:05 am

Having a gun in the home dramatically increases the odds of death and injury to residents of the home - wife, kids, the gun owner himself, etc..

All to sooth the emotional needs of a fella who falls a little short in other areas?

Get a dog.


22 people like this
Posted by Responsible Gun Ownership
a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 19, 2018 at 8:42 am

> The sign of a repressive society is one where only the military and police are allowed to carry firearms. Look around the world and you will comprehend this observation.
>> Britain. Germany. Sweden. Japan. Australia. France. On and on.
All repressive. Yeah, right.

Except that the above countries are more prone to terrorism than many of those allowing private gun ownership. Sometimes response time is slower when firearms are carried only by the professionals (911 calls and warfare maneuvers).

Individuals have a right to protect themselves and their families. It's in the Constitution. While the amendment was initially created to ensure a well-armed militia to stave off potential attacks from other countries, terrorism can also be considered an attack on our homeland whether emanating from the outside or within.

Firearm safety and marksmanship should be taught in high schools schools like driver training. It would be a fun class and I imagine that many students would enjoy an opportunity to learn a new skill that they could carry into adulthood.


10 people like this
Posted by Long/Short Gun at Home
a resident of Fairmeadow
on Sep 19, 2018 at 9:17 am

"the above countries are more prone to terrorism than many of those allowing private gun ownership"

10,000 Americans will be killed by guns this year.

How many terrorism deaths have been prevented by so-called responsible gun owners this year?

I'm concerned for you - my concern is as follows: Is the Kool-aid you are guzzling at least tasty and refreshing? Cuz it sure effects your emotions.


As for: "While the amendment was initially created" One finds it odd this comes from the same sub-set that declares one must honor The Constitution in it's original form... Originalism! Original Intent!

Again, why are gun nuts be so emotionally attached? Hmmmmm.... perhaps their call for greater mental health services is something that we should heed.

So, so, so emotional. One might even use the word snowf.... nah, nevermind.


19 people like this
Posted by Protect the American Way
a resident of another community
on Sep 19, 2018 at 2:30 pm

> How many terrorism deaths have been prevented by so-called responsible gun owners this year?

This is a query best answered in 'open-carry' states. Since the debate here is focused more on 'at-home' accidents, it would be interesting to note how many potential terrorist acts were averted because right around the corner was a true American packing some serious heat.


12 people like this
Posted by Cadet of deferment
a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 19, 2018 at 3:14 pm

10,000 Americans killed this year

Vs

"it would be interesting to note how many potential terrorist acts were averted because right around the corner"

Good gawd, the NRA didn't give you a fake number with that talking point?!?!?!

What does the NRA do with all that Russian money if they don't make up numbers?


10 people like this
Posted by Cadet of deferment
a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 19, 2018 at 3:15 pm

"focused more on 'at-home' accidents"

Is that what you call 10,000 dead Americans every year?


21 people like this
Posted by Protect the American Way
a resident of another community
on Sep 19, 2018 at 3:25 pm

> 10,000 Americans killed this year

VS

40,000+ Americans killed last year (2017) from automobile-related deaths.

Should cars be outlawed?

I often feel safer alongside my firearms than behind the wheel of a car dealing with bad drivers on the road.

Proper training in the safe and responsible use of both is the key.

Keep our country safe...and report any questionable-looking people who want to disrupt our American way of life.


20 people like this
Posted by A Proud American
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Sep 19, 2018 at 5:35 pm

>...and report any questionable-looking people who want to disrupt our American way of life.

Does this include my neighbors who I suspect were barbequing a goat last weekend?


26 people like this
Posted by Car villages
a resident of Greater Miranda
on Sep 19, 2018 at 8:36 pm


Proper training in the safe and responsible use of both is the key.

^^^^^^^

How's that working out?

A: "10,000 dead Americans every year?"


Require classes and annual safety training? Insurance? Testing? Annual registration fees?

You said they are just like cars.....


13 people like this
Posted by Protect Yourself (Just in Case)
a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 20, 2018 at 9:24 am

>>Proper training in the safe and responsible use of both is the key.

So far, no one has addressed the issue of self-defense. If someone is shooting at you, are you going to call 911 and remain passive or try to hide somewhere in the bushes? Are you going to use your finely-honed martial arts skills to disarm the assailant? The last time I checked, meditation/praying doesn't work and even a 5th degree black belt in kung fu cannot deflect a flying bullet.

No...if properly trained, you pull out your firearm of choice and shoot back. Then call 911 and report the incident. The key is to always use good judgment and not be trigger-happy as you will be held accountable for any indiscretionary actions.

As far as gun-related mental illness, robberies, street, domestic and school violence are concerned, that's a whole different story and scenario.

Try to remember, guns themselves don't kill people. People do.

As the old saying goes...drive responsibly. Well along those same lines, shoot responsibly (as well as accurately). Don't waste ammo.



4 people like this
Posted by Long/Short Gun at Home
a resident of Fairmeadow
on Sep 20, 2018 at 9:35 am

re: "Protect Yourself (Just in Case)"

Protect your loved ones in your home by NOT having guns in your home.

Guns kill. And they are 11 times more likely to kill or injure the residents than be used in self defense.

"regardless of storage practice, type of gun, or number of firearms in the home, having a gun in the home was associated with an increased risk of firearm homicide and firearm suicide in the home."


Numerous studies show the facts:

"Those persons with guns in the home were at greater risk than those without guns in the home of dying from a homicide in the home (adjusted odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 3.4). They were also at greater risk of dying from a firearm homicide, but risk varied by age and whether the person was living with others at the time of death.

...

Results show that regardless of storage practice, type of gun, or number of firearms in the home, having a gun in the home was associated with an increased risk of firearm homicide and firearm suicide in the home."


Good God. Protect your family by NOT having guns.

"regardless of storage practice, type of gun, or number of firearms in the home, having a gun in the home was associated with an increased risk of firearm homicide and firearm suicide in the home."

A gun nut's emotional attachment to make up for his shortcomings does not change fact. Guns kill loved ones.


"regardless of storage practice, type of gun, or number of firearms in the home, having a gun in the home was associated with an increased risk of firearm homicide and firearm suicide in the home."


Johns Hopkins
American Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 160, Issue 10
"Guns in the Home and Risk of a Violent Death in the Home: Findings from a National Study"
Web Link



2 people like this
Posted by Long/Short Gun at Home
a resident of Fairmeadow
on Sep 20, 2018 at 9:42 am

btw: guns kill THIRTY THOUSAND 30,000 Americans a year.




Scientific American
PUBLIC HEALTH
More Guns Do Not Stop More Crimes, Evidence Shows
More firearms do not keep people safe, hard numbers show. Why do so many Americans believe the opposite?
By Melinda Wenner Moyer on October 1, 2017



They ask "Why do so many Americans believe the opposite?"

It's an emotional shortcoming. Some gun nuts think a long barrel makes up for a short barrel. Just go to a range and watch. It's so obvious.


12 people like this
Posted by Protect Yourself (Just in Case)
a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 20, 2018 at 9:56 am

@Long/Short Gun at Home
> 10,000 Americans will be killed by guns this year.
> guns kill THIRTY THOUSAND 30,000 Americans a year.

Judging by your previous postings, the number is significantly going down. That's good news.

I would imagine the number of gun-related deaths is even higher worldwide.

BTW, in an ongoing effort to stem the ongoing madness of gun-related deaths, when will you begin speaking out against war in general? The numbers involved are much higher and worthy of serious note.

Or are you OK with that particular application?


4 people like this
Posted by Long/Short Gun at Home
a resident of Fairmeadow
on Sep 20, 2018 at 10:12 am

" in an ongoing effort to stem the ongoing madness of gun-related deaths, when will you begin speaking out against war in general?"

That the best ya got? Wow. I guess your defense of killing 30,000 Americans with guns every year isn't easy. One would think the NRA would provide you with some of their ridiculous myths (guns = safety!)



"In 2013, there were 73,505 nonfatal firearm injuries and 33,636 deaths due to injury by firearms."


A gun is more likely to be used to kill or injure an innocent person in the home than a threatening intruder.

I guess it's okay if you are a loner by yourself, but if you have loved ones, they are LESS SAFE with guns in the home.


Wars? Please open up a new thread that fulfills your war fantasies. This is about your gun fantasies and how they endanger your loved ones.


10 people like this
Posted by You Can't Fight the NRA
a resident of Los Altos
on Sep 20, 2018 at 2:18 pm

Wars should be fought with paint-ball guns. Once shot, the eliminated player/soldier should then have to go sit in a corner and watch Hannity/Judge Pirino on Fox News.

But on a more serious note...you cannot remove guns from the American landscape. It just ain't gonna happen. That would be like depriving Italians of pasta and red wine.

Guns are as American as Disneyland. So shoot intruders responsibly.


2 people like this
Posted by Short barreled
a resident of Woodside
on Sep 20, 2018 at 2:57 pm

There the gunsters go, with the short barrels, off fantasizing about war again.

They haven't real solutions to 33,000 Americans cut down every year, 70,000 I justed.

100,000 American families with their lives destroyed.

Every year.

And they joke about it.

May God keep their guns from injuring their loved ones,despite the statistics. And may he someday share both humility and wisdom with them.



13 people like this
Posted by You Can't Fight the NRA
a resident of Los Altos
on Sep 20, 2018 at 3:18 pm

The statistics are staggering BUT usually it's the criminal, incredibly stupid and/or mentally deranged mindsets that give guns a bad name.

Good people don't do bad things with guns if they are responsible gun owners and law-abiding citizens.

BTW, I don't own any guns but I've got some crossbows that can penetrate steel.


2 people like this
Posted by Short barreled
a resident of Woodside
on Sep 20, 2018 at 3:28 pm

"statistics are staggering BUT usually it's the criminal"

Please show us links to the studies that prove that absurd claim.

Guns in homes are 11 times more likely to kill or injure someone in the home than be used in self defense.

Source: National Institute of Heath (Kellerman) Web Link


8 people like this
Posted by Get the Lead Out
a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 20, 2018 at 5:43 pm

So how do all of these 'anti-gun in the house' mentalities suggest keeping firearms out of the reach of criminals, the mentally disturbed and irresponsible types?

If gun ownership is severely restricted to law-abiding people, then only the above types will still have them. Not fair (or safe) by any means.


Like this comment
Posted by Silly
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Sep 20, 2018 at 9:01 pm

Change laws to keep guns away from criminals and sick folk. Make manufacturers liable like every other industry. Dealers too.


Like this comment
Posted by Silly
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Sep 20, 2018 at 9:07 pm

Microstamping too. Licensing. Insurance.

What are your solutions? Other than some phantom "better mental health".....


24 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 20, 2018 at 10:20 pm

Curmudgeon is a registered user.

"I often feel safer alongside my firearms than behind the wheel of a car dealing with bad drivers on the road."

I usually feel safer inside my automobile than behind the barrel of a gun guarding against bad gun owners out there.

Guns have two uses: killing, and practicing to kill.

Guns don't kill people. People with guns kill people.


2 people like this
Posted by R. Davis
a resident of Crescent Park
on Sep 21, 2018 at 8:05 am

Curious. An off the beaten path query but...

How many of you guys (especially amongst the anti-firearm proponents) had BB guns as children? My parents never let me have one and I was always somewhat envious of those who did.

As with real guns, the problems usually arose when kids did stupid things with them (e.g. taking out windows and shooting at each other).

I had some HS friends who prior to moving to PA grew up in rural areas and it was not uncommon for them to have .22 rifles as kids. Of course they resided where there was far more open space (i.e. forests and fields) and away from suburbia.


28 people like this
Posted by Kids Will Be Kids
a resident of Professorville
on Sep 21, 2018 at 8:40 am

> How many of you guys had BB guns as children?

I had them all as a kid. Started off with a Mattel shooting shell Winchester which had these spring-loaded cartridges with plastic projectile bullets. Eventually the plastic bullets were discontinued due to child safety concerns.

Then I graduated to Daisy BB guns. Had both the pump action and lever action models. It was always a challenge to fire-off shots as quickly as possible because you were limited by having to pump or crank each successive shot.

Because we lived near downtown PA in a residential area I was never allowed to have a .22 although I did have a single-shot .177 Benjamin air rifle. It got confistcated when I accidentally missed my target and punctured a neighbor's car.
My father had to pay for the bodywork repair and it was taken out of my allowance.

Also had a couple of slingshots. You could use the BBs as ammo and the velocity was actually more than that of a BB gun if you used good surgical tubing.

The good old days.




5 people like this
Posted by Short barreled
a resident of Woodside
on Sep 21, 2018 at 8:41 am

"Guns in homes are 11 times more likely to kill or injure someone in the home than be used in self defense."

Protect your loved ones and yourself. Don't keep guns just to assuage some fixation or emotional need.


16 people like this
Posted by Short barreled
a resident of Woodside
on Sep 21, 2018 at 12:51 pm

Just catching up on some news at lunch, and one comes across this - President Trump held a rally last night in Las Vegas, site of the most terrible mass shooting we've had, and...

"The Las Vegas rally was held three miles from the Mandalay Bay hotel where a gunman opened fire just over a year ago, killing 58 people and leaving 851 injured.

Trump made no mention of the shooting, though he assured Heller would vote in favor of the Second Amendment."


Incredible - 58 murdered and leaving 851 injured. And no comment.

But hey now, let's keep joking about guns: "shoot responsibly (as well as accurately). Don't waste ammo."


12 people like this
Posted by Cesar
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Sep 21, 2018 at 2:33 pm

What's worse. A raging pit bull or a loaded firearm?

I have a pit bull as I am no longer allowed to own a firearm. He is a very strong deterrent against trespassing on my property.

He don't ask questions.


26 people like this
Posted by Just Like Dennis the Menace
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 22, 2018 at 2:08 pm

>> Also had a couple of slingshots. You could use the BBs as ammo and the velocity was actually more than that of a BB gun if you used good surgical tubing.

We used strips of discarded inner-tubes. Incredible fire-power.

As for a good guard/attack dog, I find pit bulls a bit unreliable due to their oftentimes undocumented breeding.

A couple of Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers or a German Shepard will keep most trespassers away.



16 people like this
Posted by Had 'Em All
a resident of another community
on Sep 22, 2018 at 6:48 pm

> How many of you guys had BB guns as children?
>>Also had a couple of slingshots.
>>The good old days.

Add some M-80s, bottle rockets, cherry bombs and firecrackers into the mix and you had a well-rounded childhood...barring stupidity.





9 people like this
Posted by The Shootist
a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 23, 2018 at 2:25 pm

> But hey now, let's keep joking about guns: "shoot responsibly (as well as accurately). Don't waste ammo."

Sounds reasonable. Not a joke by any means.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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