News

Man injured when cement truck flips over at construction site

Driver taken to Stanford trauma center for what appear to be non-life-threatening injuries

A man driving a cement truck was injured when the vehicle flipped upside down and trapped him at a construction site off of El Camino Real, prompting Palo Alto fire crews to conduct a rescue that lasted nearly an hour Friday afternoon, a battalion chief said.

Firefighters responded to a rescue requested at the construction site at 2600 El Camino Real around 12:30 p.m., fire Battalion Chief Kevin McNally said. When they arrived they saw the 10-wheeled cement truck was "literally 180-degrees upside down" and learned the man was pinned inside.

The incident was categorized as a "heavy rescue," requiring rescue crews to stop the engine from running in an effort to prevent the vehicle from rolling over, McNally said. It was "fairly difficult" to reach the man, who was stuck in the truck's cab. They used hydraulic cutting tools to reach him and extricate him from the vehicle.

The cement truck driver was the sole occupant and taken by ambulance to Stanford Hospital's trauma center, according to McNally. The battalion chief said the injured man, who was conscious and breathing, had injuries that appeared to be non-life-threatening.

The public was advised to expect delays in the area while fire and rescue crews are at the scene collecting their equipment and working to upright the vehicle, which will be "tricky" considering the construction site is below grade, according to McNally. Lanes on southbound El Camino Real were expected to be blocked for several hours.

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Six firefighters were seen carrying the man away on a stretcher shortly before 1:30 p.m.

Mountain View firefighters assisted Palo Alto crews with the rescue.

Frank Polizzi, a California Department of Industrial Relations spokesman, said the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA) was notified regarding the incident, which involved an employee of the company Graniterock, which is headquartered in Watsonville. The cement truck turned over, pinning the employee's arm, the company reported to the agency.

"Cal/OSHA is waiting on more information to determine if an inspection will be opened. If the employee is hospitalized (in the hospital for more than 24 hours for more than observation) then the incident is reportable," he said in an email, indicating at that point they could open an investigation.

A six-story, concrete slab Brutalist building that previously stood at the site was demolished by developer Sand Hill Property Company in December. Sand Hill Property plans to replace the structure with a four-story, 62,616-square-foot glass structure that will have a two-level garage.

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The site is currently under excavation for a 258-stall underground parking garage. The new building would have about 55,000 square feet of office space. It would retain the underground garage currently at the site, adding a parking deck to the rear to create 31 additional parking spaces.

This story will be updated as more information becomes available.

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Man injured when cement truck flips over at construction site

Driver taken to Stanford trauma center for what appear to be non-life-threatening injuries

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Fri, Jun 22, 2018, 1:39 pm
Updated: Mon, Jun 25, 2018, 8:44 am

A man driving a cement truck was injured when the vehicle flipped upside down and trapped him at a construction site off of El Camino Real, prompting Palo Alto fire crews to conduct a rescue that lasted nearly an hour Friday afternoon, a battalion chief said.

Firefighters responded to a rescue requested at the construction site at 2600 El Camino Real around 12:30 p.m., fire Battalion Chief Kevin McNally said. When they arrived they saw the 10-wheeled cement truck was "literally 180-degrees upside down" and learned the man was pinned inside.

The incident was categorized as a "heavy rescue," requiring rescue crews to stop the engine from running in an effort to prevent the vehicle from rolling over, McNally said. It was "fairly difficult" to reach the man, who was stuck in the truck's cab. They used hydraulic cutting tools to reach him and extricate him from the vehicle.

The cement truck driver was the sole occupant and taken by ambulance to Stanford Hospital's trauma center, according to McNally. The battalion chief said the injured man, who was conscious and breathing, had injuries that appeared to be non-life-threatening.

The public was advised to expect delays in the area while fire and rescue crews are at the scene collecting their equipment and working to upright the vehicle, which will be "tricky" considering the construction site is below grade, according to McNally. Lanes on southbound El Camino Real were expected to be blocked for several hours.

Six firefighters were seen carrying the man away on a stretcher shortly before 1:30 p.m.

Mountain View firefighters assisted Palo Alto crews with the rescue.

Frank Polizzi, a California Department of Industrial Relations spokesman, said the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA) was notified regarding the incident, which involved an employee of the company Graniterock, which is headquartered in Watsonville. The cement truck turned over, pinning the employee's arm, the company reported to the agency.

"Cal/OSHA is waiting on more information to determine if an inspection will be opened. If the employee is hospitalized (in the hospital for more than 24 hours for more than observation) then the incident is reportable," he said in an email, indicating at that point they could open an investigation.

A six-story, concrete slab Brutalist building that previously stood at the site was demolished by developer Sand Hill Property Company in December. Sand Hill Property plans to replace the structure with a four-story, 62,616-square-foot glass structure that will have a two-level garage.

The site is currently under excavation for a 258-stall underground parking garage. The new building would have about 55,000 square feet of office space. It would retain the underground garage currently at the site, adding a parking deck to the rear to create 31 additional parking spaces.

This story will be updated as more information becomes available.

Comments

Concrete Prof
Old Palo Alto
on Jun 22, 2018 at 2:40 pm
Concrete Prof, Old Palo Alto
on Jun 22, 2018 at 2:40 pm
18 people like this

Hopefully the driver is ok. Writer of the story should note that this is a Ready-mix Concrete Delivery Truck. Cement is a powder that is an ingredient in ready-mix concrete.


David
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 24, 2018 at 8:48 am
David, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 24, 2018 at 8:48 am
20 people like this

It should be noted that the reason Mt. View Fire had to assist Palo Alto Fire with this rescue/extraction is because Palo Alto Fire no longer staffs a Heavy Rescue truck 24/7. Fire Chief Nickel decided to eliminate this truck and nine full time Firefighters. Every city in the bayarea that is the size of Palo Alto or bigger, has a Heavy Rescue truck staffed 24/7.


musical
Palo Verde
on Jun 24, 2018 at 9:08 am
musical, Palo Verde
on Jun 24, 2018 at 9:08 am
8 people like this

^ .. yet another reason to not permit so much Heavy Construction in Palo Alto.


David
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 24, 2018 at 11:17 am
David, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 24, 2018 at 11:17 am
1 person likes this

There was a similar rescue a few decades ago on Page Mill Road near Foothills Park where a tandem flatbed hauling pallets of concrete bags lost his brakes and over turned in 1990. It took over an hour to extract the driver. Heavy rescue with many many personnel on a very hot day. A once in a career rescue event.


Economies of scale
Registered user
Community Center
on Jun 25, 2018 at 9:22 am
Economies of scale, Community Center
Registered user
on Jun 25, 2018 at 9:22 am
16 people like this

Glad the driver seems to be OK!
@David - If there is a heavy rescue truck available as close as Mountain View, why does Palo Alto need to have one staffed 24/7 also? There is value in coordinating with our neighbors not living like we are an island.


TorreyaMan
Registered user
Palo Verde
on Jun 25, 2018 at 10:41 am
TorreyaMan, Palo Verde
Registered user
on Jun 25, 2018 at 10:41 am
9 people like this

I agree with Economies of Scale, comment above.


Pedestrian Ssafety
College Terrace
on Jun 25, 2018 at 12:50 pm
Pedestrian Ssafety, College Terrace
on Jun 25, 2018 at 12:50 pm
4 people like this

Grateful it was not worse. I was right there on El Camino when it happened.With all the massive construction taking place on Stanford Campus/property and beyond it’s a cautionary reality check. The EMT Emergency response was incredible. The thick line of earth hauling trailers from Stanford, thundering at high speeds up and down El Camino, Oregon Expressway and Alma - I am gravely concerned that Stanford and the City are not more vigilant about safety. Unless one is directly in front of these sites there are no other road signs “construction a head” or SLOW down flag warnings around it’s super, loud, congested and dangerous crossing streets on foot, bike. With so much arterial activity taking place in the Page Mill El Camino Real, Cal Ave, Mayfield, Park Blvd, and Stanford commercial, residential, and campus zones – Thankfully, not more accidents are taking place.Can the city put in Slow Speed construction sign at Page Mill/El Camino Real and at Embarcadero/El Camino Real? Does the City and Stanford care?


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