News

Stanford admit rate lowest in university's history

A total 47,450 students applied, a jump from last year's pool of 44,073

Stanford University accepted 2,040 students to its incoming class for Fall 2018, the undergraduate admissions office announced on Friday.

The admission rate of 4.29 percent is the lowest in Stanford's history. The university said 47,450 students applied, a jump from last year's pool of 44,073 applicants.

Students who accept the offer will become Stanford University's Class of 2022. The figure includes 750 individuals who were accepted to the school in December 2017 as early action applicants.

Last year, the school admitted 2,050 students to the Class of 2021.

This year, 50.8 percent of admits are male and 49.2 percent are female, according to Stanford admissions. Students were accepted from every U.S. state and 11.4 percent are international students.

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The proportion of students who are the first in their family to go to college has increased slightly from last year at a little over 18 percent, to this year at 18.3 percent.

About 65 percent of student admits expressed an interest in Humanities and Sciences programs, 30 percent said Engineering, 3.5 percent said Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences and 1.5 percent are undecided.

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Stanford admit rate lowest in university's history

A total 47,450 students applied, a jump from last year's pool of 44,073

Uploaded: Mon, Apr 2, 2018, 9:25 am

Stanford University accepted 2,040 students to its incoming class for Fall 2018, the undergraduate admissions office announced on Friday.

The admission rate of 4.29 percent is the lowest in Stanford's history. The university said 47,450 students applied, a jump from last year's pool of 44,073 applicants.

Students who accept the offer will become Stanford University's Class of 2022. The figure includes 750 individuals who were accepted to the school in December 2017 as early action applicants.

Last year, the school admitted 2,050 students to the Class of 2021.

This year, 50.8 percent of admits are male and 49.2 percent are female, according to Stanford admissions. Students were accepted from every U.S. state and 11.4 percent are international students.

The proportion of students who are the first in their family to go to college has increased slightly from last year at a little over 18 percent, to this year at 18.3 percent.

About 65 percent of student admits expressed an interest in Humanities and Sciences programs, 30 percent said Engineering, 3.5 percent said Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences and 1.5 percent are undecided.

— Bay City News Service

Comments

resident
Downtown North
on Apr 2, 2018 at 10:08 am
resident, Downtown North
on Apr 2, 2018 at 10:08 am

Really lame title to this article. They admitted about the same number of students as last year. The real news is the big jump in applications, which they really have no control over.


Scott
Menlo Park
on Apr 2, 2018 at 11:36 am
Scott, Menlo Park
on Apr 2, 2018 at 11:36 am

Actually, the title is accurate, as it refers to "admit rate", not number of students admitted. Admit rate is the number admitted divided by the number who applied. As noted, change in the number who applied was the cause of the lower admit rate.


bike commuter
Charleston Meadows
on Apr 2, 2018 at 1:40 pm
bike commuter, Charleston Meadows
on Apr 2, 2018 at 1:40 pm

Universities do have controls over the number of applicants, and many universities are extremely good at engineering this number by encouraging many students they will reject to apply. The inflation of this number is mostly driven by USNees’ ranking system, which emphasizes the admission rate. If this metric was removed from the ranking, the admission rates will bounce again


Curmudgeon
Downtown North
on Apr 2, 2018 at 4:43 pm
Curmudgeon, Downtown North
on Apr 2, 2018 at 4:43 pm

"If this metric was removed from the ranking, the admission rates will bounce again"

So Stanford would then admit more frosh? Why? Or fewer frosh wannabes would apply? Why?

Silly statistics may be excusable. Obsessing over silly staristics is not.


bike commuter
Charleston Meadows
on Apr 2, 2018 at 9:46 pm
bike commuter , Charleston Meadows
on Apr 2, 2018 at 9:46 pm

The single most effective way to push down the admission rate (so the university looks more selective) is to expand its applications. To achieve this, some universities would “invite” certain high school students to apply, and make the process extremely easy. They knew these students are designed to inflate the denominator. A university I know has successfully lowered their admission rate from >20% to ~8% and climbed 10 spots in 15 years. It’s a waste of resource and emotion.


Paly parent
College Terrace
on Apr 3, 2018 at 8:06 pm
Paly parent , College Terrace
on Apr 3, 2018 at 8:06 pm

Bike Commuter is correct. Schools for many years now have gamed the USNews Ranking methodology. One school down south has excelled at this. They accept super scoring SATs which raises the incoming class’s SAT score over schools that don’t super score, they defer students with lower gpas to enroll in the spring leaving higher scoring students to enroll in the Fall (USNews only counts Fall admissions in their ranking), and they encourage applicants that have little chance of acceptance to apply.

All of this bc of a publication you’ve never heard of and whose articles you’ve never read except for this one ranking.


musical
Palo Verde
on Apr 3, 2018 at 10:10 pm
musical, Palo Verde
on Apr 3, 2018 at 10:10 pm

You think Stanford is bad? Check out Google's admit rate.
I doubt one in a hundred applicants is accepted.

Top ranking on US News Best Jobs this year is "software developer."
Interestingly "statistician" is ranked at number 6, just below orthodontist.


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