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Christopher Dawes of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford to retire

President and CEO, who also headed Stanford Children's Health, leaves post after nearly 30 years of service

Christopher Dawes has announced his retirement as president and CEO of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford and Stanford Children's Health after nearly 30 years of service. Dawes made the announcement Tuesday morning in an open letter to colleagues on LinkedIn.

He had initially planned to announce his retirement next week with the intention of remaining in his role until the process of hiring his replacement was complete, but recent health developments prompted him to take medical leave effective immediately, according to the letter.

Dawes was appointed CEO of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital in 1997, eight years after joining the Children's Hospital at Stanford.

"I am particularly proud of the excellent clinical services we have created, several of which are nationally ranked, the investments we have made in the Children's Health Research Institute (CHRI), the network we have created to provide more access to the care we provide and, of course, our new 'main' building," he said in his letter.

Stanford Children's Health tweeted Tuesday afternoon that they are "very supportive of Chris' decision to focus his full energy on his health." They stated that they will "stay the course" that Dawes has set into motion and thanked him for his service.

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Dr. Dennis "Denny" Lund, Chief Medical Officer, will serve as the interim CEO until the recruitment process is complete.

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Christopher Dawes of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford to retire

President and CEO, who also headed Stanford Children's Health, leaves post after nearly 30 years of service

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Mar 21, 2018, 9:52 am

Christopher Dawes has announced his retirement as president and CEO of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford and Stanford Children's Health after nearly 30 years of service. Dawes made the announcement Tuesday morning in an open letter to colleagues on LinkedIn.

He had initially planned to announce his retirement next week with the intention of remaining in his role until the process of hiring his replacement was complete, but recent health developments prompted him to take medical leave effective immediately, according to the letter.

Dawes was appointed CEO of Lucile Packard Children's Hospital in 1997, eight years after joining the Children's Hospital at Stanford.

"I am particularly proud of the excellent clinical services we have created, several of which are nationally ranked, the investments we have made in the Children's Health Research Institute (CHRI), the network we have created to provide more access to the care we provide and, of course, our new 'main' building," he said in his letter.

Stanford Children's Health tweeted Tuesday afternoon that they are "very supportive of Chris' decision to focus his full energy on his health." They stated that they will "stay the course" that Dawes has set into motion and thanked him for his service.

Dr. Dennis "Denny" Lund, Chief Medical Officer, will serve as the interim CEO until the recruitment process is complete.

Comments

Former Unit Clerk
Crescent Park
on Mar 21, 2018 at 11:19 am
Former Unit Clerk, Crescent Park
on Mar 21, 2018 at 11:19 am

I was a unit clerk at LSPCH when Daws took over. He made a lot of changes that hurt the clerks and other workers who were not supported by a union. In a meeting, he basically told the clerks that we were all replaceable. He then cut our 8 hour day to 7.5 hours. Most of us worked less than 40 hour weeks (the job was incredibly stressful) and loosing that 30 minutes per shift really hurt. It also prevented the much needed shift overlap, when the previous shift updated/assisted the next shift. He also tried to save the hospital money by having the cleaning staff deliver trays to the patients bedside, which I didn't think was a good idea. They'd go from scrubbing a room to putting on gloves and a gown to deliver food to very ill children.

Working as a unit clerk was the most difficult and stressful job of my working career. When I worked at LCPH doctors were still handwriting orders in the patients' charts, which the clerk had to transcribe and then make sure lab work and tests were completed. The unit clerk position was eventually eliminated once doctors relied more on computers. It was a thankless and stressful job, and I felt so unvalued [Portion removed.]



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