News

Nonprofits scramble to get legal aid to immigrants

County supervisors plan to boost funds amid ICE raids

Santa Clara County officials are preparing another round of grant funding to aid undocumented immigrants facing the threat of deportation amid heightened immigration enforcement activity in the Bay Area.

In June, Santa Clara County Supervisors committed $3.5 million to more than a dozen nonprofits in order to increase legal aid available to the county's immigrant community. The decision was largely a response to rhetoric from President Donald Trump -- and later Trump's executive orders -- shifting priorities toward heavy-handed immigration enforcement.

Since then, there have been multiple well-publicized sweeps by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) targeting the Bay Area as recently as last month. ICE released a statement on Feb. 27 touting the agency's arrests of more than 150 people in the Bay Area, about half of whom had criminal convictions, in a weeklong effort targeting so-called sanctuary jurisdictions.

In an effort to react quickly to what they saw as a threat to its constituents, county supervisors agreed to distribute the $3.5 million to 18 nonprofits in the county that provide a broad range of services, including "Know Your Rights" education and legal defense during deportation proceedings.

County administrators say the need for legal representation still far exceeds the demand, and they will return to the Board of Supervisors with recommendations this month to renew funding through the 2018-19 fiscal year. Although specific details are still to come, the funding will likely shift away from education initiatives and focus more on legal defense.

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Among the nonprofits helping North County residents is Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto (CLSEPA), which received $320,000 in county grant funds this year and recently opened up a new office on Fairchild Drive in Mountain View. Reports from the county say that as of December, the nonprofit provided "direct representation" to 86 unaccompanied minors and families with children who were in expedited deportation proceedings in the San Francisco Immigration Court since June. All of them were Latino, with many from Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.

"Many of these children and families have fled violence and abuse in Central America," according to the staff report.

ICE activity has ramped up since fall, with quite a few arrests in San Jose as well as other cities in Santa Clara County, according Misha Seay, a senior immigration attorney for CLSEPA. Although the name suggests otherwise, she said the organization opened the Mountain View office in order to expand its outreach to North County residents, and wants to let the immigrant community know that legal help is available. Unlike other court proceedings, immigration courts are not required to provide a legal defense to the defendant.

"As you can imagine, that creates a huge gap in services and a big need for the immigrant population who can't afford private counsel on their own," she said.

In August, Santa Clara County launched the Rapid Response Network, which calls on community members to alert immigration advocacy groups whenever ICE is suspected of detaining someone in the community. Once an arrest is confirmed, the network calls on attorneys like the ones at CLSEPA to offer legal representation to whoever was picked up.

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"That's the part we're heavily involved in, and it's actually been occurring quite frequently," Seay said. "We'll go to ICE and meet with the (detainee) before they get transported to the detention center."

One of the major hurdles for CLSEPA and similar advocacy groups is that the immigration courts were already clogged up before Trump took office, and it's only gotten worse since then. In a report to the county, CLSEPA staffers noted that the backlog has gotten so bad that initial hearings for unaccompanied children at the San Francisco Immigration Court are being scheduled for 2021, and hearings for asylum applicants are being pushed out between two and five years, depending on the judge.

"These backlogs create uncertainty and anxiety for clients, who have to wait years for their cases to be resolved," according to the report. "This backlog also places pressure on our immigration program; because cases are not closing, it limits the number of new cases that we can initiate."

Delegating the immigrant support to nonprofits using taxpayer dollars hasn't been without its own set of problems. At a Finance and Government Operations Committee meeting last week, County Supervisor Cindy Chavez said that the partnership comes with a higher level of accountability that, frankly, none of the nonprofit partners seems to want.

At the same time, some of the nonprofits in the latest reports aren't meeting the goals or spending the money allocated by the county, which Chavez worried is locking up money that could be better spent elsewhere.

"I want to make sure we can take some of the remaining money that's not being spent and redirect it, because we are in a crisis," she said. "And I don't think it's okay to leave money that's not really being drawn down while we have individuals who are literally in crisis right now and we can help."

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Nonprofits scramble to get legal aid to immigrants

County supervisors plan to boost funds amid ICE raids

by / Mountain View Voice

Uploaded: Tue, Mar 20, 2018, 9:09 am

Santa Clara County officials are preparing another round of grant funding to aid undocumented immigrants facing the threat of deportation amid heightened immigration enforcement activity in the Bay Area.

In June, Santa Clara County Supervisors committed $3.5 million to more than a dozen nonprofits in order to increase legal aid available to the county's immigrant community. The decision was largely a response to rhetoric from President Donald Trump -- and later Trump's executive orders -- shifting priorities toward heavy-handed immigration enforcement.

Since then, there have been multiple well-publicized sweeps by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) targeting the Bay Area as recently as last month. ICE released a statement on Feb. 27 touting the agency's arrests of more than 150 people in the Bay Area, about half of whom had criminal convictions, in a weeklong effort targeting so-called sanctuary jurisdictions.

In an effort to react quickly to what they saw as a threat to its constituents, county supervisors agreed to distribute the $3.5 million to 18 nonprofits in the county that provide a broad range of services, including "Know Your Rights" education and legal defense during deportation proceedings.

County administrators say the need for legal representation still far exceeds the demand, and they will return to the Board of Supervisors with recommendations this month to renew funding through the 2018-19 fiscal year. Although specific details are still to come, the funding will likely shift away from education initiatives and focus more on legal defense.

Among the nonprofits helping North County residents is Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto (CLSEPA), which received $320,000 in county grant funds this year and recently opened up a new office on Fairchild Drive in Mountain View. Reports from the county say that as of December, the nonprofit provided "direct representation" to 86 unaccompanied minors and families with children who were in expedited deportation proceedings in the San Francisco Immigration Court since June. All of them were Latino, with many from Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.

"Many of these children and families have fled violence and abuse in Central America," according to the staff report.

ICE activity has ramped up since fall, with quite a few arrests in San Jose as well as other cities in Santa Clara County, according Misha Seay, a senior immigration attorney for CLSEPA. Although the name suggests otherwise, she said the organization opened the Mountain View office in order to expand its outreach to North County residents, and wants to let the immigrant community know that legal help is available. Unlike other court proceedings, immigration courts are not required to provide a legal defense to the defendant.

"As you can imagine, that creates a huge gap in services and a big need for the immigrant population who can't afford private counsel on their own," she said.

In August, Santa Clara County launched the Rapid Response Network, which calls on community members to alert immigration advocacy groups whenever ICE is suspected of detaining someone in the community. Once an arrest is confirmed, the network calls on attorneys like the ones at CLSEPA to offer legal representation to whoever was picked up.

"That's the part we're heavily involved in, and it's actually been occurring quite frequently," Seay said. "We'll go to ICE and meet with the (detainee) before they get transported to the detention center."

One of the major hurdles for CLSEPA and similar advocacy groups is that the immigration courts were already clogged up before Trump took office, and it's only gotten worse since then. In a report to the county, CLSEPA staffers noted that the backlog has gotten so bad that initial hearings for unaccompanied children at the San Francisco Immigration Court are being scheduled for 2021, and hearings for asylum applicants are being pushed out between two and five years, depending on the judge.

"These backlogs create uncertainty and anxiety for clients, who have to wait years for their cases to be resolved," according to the report. "This backlog also places pressure on our immigration program; because cases are not closing, it limits the number of new cases that we can initiate."

Delegating the immigrant support to nonprofits using taxpayer dollars hasn't been without its own set of problems. At a Finance and Government Operations Committee meeting last week, County Supervisor Cindy Chavez said that the partnership comes with a higher level of accountability that, frankly, none of the nonprofit partners seems to want.

At the same time, some of the nonprofits in the latest reports aren't meeting the goals or spending the money allocated by the county, which Chavez worried is locking up money that could be better spent elsewhere.

"I want to make sure we can take some of the remaining money that's not being spent and redirect it, because we are in a crisis," she said. "And I don't think it's okay to leave money that's not really being drawn down while we have individuals who are literally in crisis right now and we can help."

Comments

Doublespeak
Midtown
on Mar 20, 2018 at 11:41 am
Doublespeak, Midtown
on Mar 20, 2018 at 11:41 am

I am an immigrant - as in someone who applied legally to come to the US, went through the vetting process and waited in line to get here. Its pretty amazing to see the word appropriated now and used to describe those that came here illegally. Why is someone who got here by breaking the law entitled to the tax money of those who live here by legal means? All of us who came here have our own set of stories to tell. No one has the monopoly on sob stories. Nor is anyone casting aspersions on the illegals as people. The distinction simply is between people who are legally entitled to be here and those who are clearly not legally entitled to be here. The current climate in California of placing the rights of illegals over all else just seems wrong on so many levels. Of course I will probably be pilloried for this opinion but it needed to be said.


MVresident2003
Registered user
Mountain View
on Mar 20, 2018 at 12:23 pm
MVresident2003, Mountain View
Registered user
on Mar 20, 2018 at 12:23 pm

Agree wholeheartedly. And it looks like some municipalities have had enough and are starting to push back. Los Alamitos has filed for an exemption from sanctuary status, will be interesting to see how this all unfolds.


Big Mon
Greenmeadow
on Mar 20, 2018 at 12:38 pm
Big Mon, Greenmeadow
on Mar 20, 2018 at 12:38 pm

"...we have individuals who are literally in crisis right now and we can help."

Welp, according to some, we shouldn't.

WWJD?


Anon
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 20, 2018 at 2:03 pm
Anon, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 20, 2018 at 2:03 pm

Posted by Doublespeak, a resident of Midtown:

>> I am an immigrant - as in someone who applied legally to come to the US, went through the vetting process and waited in line to get here. Its pretty amazing to see the word appropriated now and used to describe those that came here illegally.

I agree with you 38.43%. But, not 100%. Here is the problem:

Not all refugees are equal, either morally, or, legally.

UN member states are required to aid "refugees" who are legitimately at risk of being killed or persecuted, according the 1951 and 1967 UN conventions. Here are some web pages about it:

Web Link

Web Link

This came about because of, e.g., the voyage of the St. Louis in 1939, Web Link , the Holocaust, the systematic starvation of "useless eaters" by the Nazis during WWII, the forcible relocation of unwilling refugees in postwar Europe 1945-1947, and so on. And on. And on. Today, we have Syrians and Yazidis and Rohingyas, and the UN Convention seems to be very inconvenient to some.

Add to that the millions of Mexican farmworkers brought to the US (by, for "growers" -- large farm producers), with the tacit approval of US governments both Democratic and Republican, mostly prior to 9/11. With children brought to the US as children, raised in the US, some of those children have been granted "dreamer" status.

Add to that a mixture of economic and political refugees from Latin America and around the world since, although much reduced since the 2008-2009 crash.

In my opinion, there is not a simple, "one size fits all", policy to deal with all these different categories. The part that I agree with you on is, why should someone who is bored working in a laundromat in Mexico be entitled to move to the US just because they feel like it? On the other hand, I've seen farmworkers toyed with for decades, treated as citizens when convenient, then kicked out when convenient. How many growers have you ever heard of who were jailed for deliberately breaking immigration laws? On a bad day, they have to pay a $250 fine for employing someone who was paid less than $100 that day.

So, IMHO, "it's complicated." Be watchful for unintended consequences.


Doublespeak
Midtown
on Mar 20, 2018 at 5:02 pm
Doublespeak, Midtown
on Mar 20, 2018 at 5:02 pm

@Anon: So now illegal migrants just just "immigrants" but also become "refugees" that should be entitled to even more special treatment? No one said anything about not taking refugees - they come here legally! Please dont continue to conflate illegal migrants with those who came here legally.


Anon
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 20, 2018 at 5:26 pm
Anon, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 20, 2018 at 5:26 pm

Posted by Doublespeak, a resident of Midtown

>> @Anon: So now illegal migrants just just "immigrants" but also become "refugees" that should be entitled to even more special treatment? No one said anything about not taking refugees - they come here legally! Please dont continue to conflate illegal migrants with those who came here legally.

Please read what I wrote more carefully. But, even better, read the following article, then post a reply. And, I can tell you, I have seen firsthand exactly what this article describes:

Web Link

"“If there is one constant in US border policy, it is hypocrisy,” Princeton University scholar Douglas Massey and colleagues wrote in their 2002 book about Mexican immigration, Beyond Smoke and Mirrors. “Throughout the twentieth century the United States has arranged to import Mexican workers while pretending not to do so.”"


Sam
Downtown North
on Mar 20, 2018 at 8:28 pm
Sam, Downtown North
on Mar 20, 2018 at 8:28 pm

Corporations need cheap labor. Where else can they get cheap disposable labor?


HUTCH 7.62
Portola Valley
on Mar 21, 2018 at 9:49 am
HUTCH 7.62, Portola Valley
on Mar 21, 2018 at 9:49 am

The Rich in the Bay Area need their cheap nannies and gardners.


A civilwar was once started when some rich Dixiecrats got upset that they were gonna lose their slaves (cheap labor)


Mordant deWitte
Mayfield
on Mar 21, 2018 at 12:07 pm
Mordant deWitte, Mayfield
on Mar 21, 2018 at 12:07 pm
HUTCH 7.62
Portola Valley
on Mar 21, 2018 at 4:12 pm
HUTCH 7.62, Portola Valley
on Mar 21, 2018 at 4:12 pm
Anon
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 21, 2018 at 4:45 pm
Anon, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 21, 2018 at 4:45 pm

[Portion removed.]

You folks should really read this article.

>>> What is often called 'illegal immigration' isn’t really treated as illegal <<<

Web Link

"Both Republican and Democratic presidential administrations have quietly permitted the continued presence of people — particularly Mexican immigrants — who managed to enter illegally or overstay visas."


jerry99
Barron Park
on Mar 26, 2018 at 7:24 am
jerry99, Barron Park
on Mar 26, 2018 at 7:24 am

[Portion removed.] ICE requests detainers for criminals that have committed serious crimes and attempts to arrest them in jails to minimize danger to ICE agents. When the lunatic state of CA does not honor these detainers, as they do not now,they must apprehend them in the community and other illegals, that would not be arrested are also detained and processed.
The State of Ca and all cities must abandon their sanctuary status to get these dangerous criminals off the streets and protect the communities.

[Portion removed.]


@jerry99
Mountain View
on Mar 26, 2018 at 4:11 pm
@jerry99, Mountain View
on Mar 26, 2018 at 4:11 pm
Big Mon
Greenmeadow
on Mar 26, 2018 at 4:51 pm
Big Mon, Greenmeadow
on Mar 26, 2018 at 4:51 pm
Nayeli
Midtown
on Mar 26, 2018 at 10:01 pm
Nayeli, Midtown
on Mar 26, 2018 at 10:01 pm

Why do people present straw man arguments about Fox News in this discussion? Fox News is not a person. Many of their pundits are biased conservatives -- just like many on CNN and MSNBC are biased liberals.

The point is that there is a world of difference between "immigrants" and citizens of other countries that ignore America's laws and move here anyway. They aren't "immigrants" any more than someone who breaks into your home is an "undocumented guest."


Rule of law
Palo Alto High School
on Mar 26, 2018 at 10:36 pm
Rule of law, Palo Alto High School
on Mar 26, 2018 at 10:36 pm

Ok, where does it end? If random illegal aliens, now labeled “immigrants” may stay, receive CA driver’s licenses, medical care, public education, section 8 housing, etc., etc., where do you draw the line? Should the entire world be able to come here, without identification paperwork, immunization history, criminal history, etc. and just “exist” here? It does NOT make any sense.
Why should we taxpayers accept this idiocy? Many countries operate on the rule of law and this includes systems for orderly application for visiting or residency, of course.
As we speak, a whole lot of people are going through customs and immigration and providing documentation and systematically entering the country. Meanwhile, on a whim, some are to be defended by Oakland mayor Libby Schaff and others who very well know better that this is contrary to any commin sense as well as to the rule of law.
Do you want lawlessness in the U.S.?
Enforce sensible legal immigration laws and work within the government to modify them, but don’t throw our federal laws away.
Where does it end?


Fed Up
Old Palo Alto
on Mar 27, 2018 at 12:38 am
Fed Up, Old Palo Alto
on Mar 27, 2018 at 12:38 am

Many states are generous, especially California.

There are quite a few recent legal immigrants who make lots of unreported money by collecting money from illegal immigrants (visa overstays, student visa holders) by directing them through the loopholes, and leading them to the resources.

We are being taken advantage of, and I'm tired of it.

Payment Program For Refugees
Web Link


Web Link

Our homeless population would get more help if they left the US, and re-entered as an illegal immigrant or refugee - geez


Curmudgeon
Downtown North
on Mar 27, 2018 at 5:50 pm
Curmudgeon, Downtown North
on Mar 27, 2018 at 5:50 pm

"Should the entire world be able to come here, without identification paperwork, immunization history, criminal history, etc. and just “exist” here?"

Why not? It happened for centuries, during America's early years. Then the descendants of those pioneering illegals decided to make laws to close the door.


"It does NOT make any sense."

It makes lots of sense. The migrants are coming here obeying the highest law in the Conservative canon--the law of the free and open marketplace. The marketplace wants a cheap expendable workforce; "illegals" offer a cheap expendable workforce. Deal done. Get ICE out of the way and let the free and open marketplace work.

Faux conservatives like Trump need "illegals." How else could they exploit irrational white fears of dark migrants to get themselves elected? Without "illegals" to help rile up the Base, Trump would still be hosting a fake reality TV farce instead of a real one.


Anon
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 27, 2018 at 6:00 pm
Anon, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 27, 2018 at 6:00 pm

Posted by Nayeli, a resident of Midtown

>> Why do people present straw man arguments about Fox News in this discussion? Fox News is not a person. Many of their pundits are biased conservatives -- just like many on CNN and MSNBC are biased liberals.

Because people who watch Fox News repeat cliches and catch phrases over and over. Fox News viewers like to use "PC" every other sentence, "virtue signalling", etc. When people start talking like Fox News, it is natural to assume that they are watching Fox News.

What Fox News loves to do is put on guests who are allowed to spew all kinds of unvarnished nonsense and hate as "opinion", so that the Fox News newscasters themselves don't have to directly lie and present these opinions as "news". They like to let the guests do it. I get to watch all of these at the gym, mostly unwillingly. CNN has launched a bunch of right-wing commentators over the years and is hardly -liberal-, but, at least Lou Dobbs is no longer on CNN. About the only moderately liberal commentator still on anywhere on primetime cable is Rachel Maddow on MSNBC, but, in the current circumstances, she doesn't seem very funny. John Bolton? "Ha-ha, ... "

"Asked about her political views by the Valley Advocate, Maddow replied, "I'm undoubtedly a liberal, which means that I'm in almost total agreement with the Eisenhower-era Republican party platform.""

>> The point is that there is a world of difference between "immigrants" and citizens of other countries that ignore America's laws and move here anyway. They aren't "immigrants" any more than someone who breaks into your home is an "undocumented guest."

I'm curious-- did you read the reference I posted earlier? Because, in my lifetime, I have seen how -growers- have been allowed to hire citizens of Mexico as "guest workers" to do agricultural work-- cultivating, pruning, picking, sorting, grading, and cleaning fruits and vegetables, for 60 years that I know of. Back in the Eisenhower Administration, they tried deporting some of the "guest workers". Web Link

In fact, I would say that if they all stayed down on the farm like they were supposed to, we wouldn't even be having this conversation. But, of course, over time, many men moved into other occupations as well, such as roofing, fencebuilding, drywall, plaster, and stucco, and other of the tougher construction jobs, as well as gardening, while women have been nannies and maids. Well, it is easy to say send them home, but, the reality is that many families will have both US citizens and Mexico citizens now -- so, the reality is breaking up families. It isn't simple. Remember, as the reference above shows, all this happened for over 70 years under Republicans and Democrats. Was it "really" illegal if governments of both parties, liberal and conservative, allowed it to happen, and even deliberately encouraged it at times?


John
College Terrace
on Mar 27, 2018 at 8:37 pm
John, College Terrace
on Mar 27, 2018 at 8:37 pm

Palo Alto will only wake up to this give-away stuff when various tax issues begin to fail, following the $10k deduction limit on federal taxes. For example, it will be interesting to see if the proposed tax increases for schools and the city go anywhere. [Portion removed.]


Ahem
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 27, 2018 at 11:35 pm
Ahem, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 27, 2018 at 11:35 pm

The Silicon Valley business model explained in 15 seconds:

1. Eliminate as many jobs as possible by developing and marketing automation.
2. Export any jobs that can't be easily automated to low-wage nations.
3. Import workers from low-wage nations to suppress wages for all of the jobs that can't be easily exported.

Pretend it is all about inclusion and diversity. If anyone challenges the model, call them a "raciss" or a NIMBY.


Agreed
Old Palo Alto
on Mar 28, 2018 at 3:07 pm
Agreed, Old Palo Alto
on Mar 28, 2018 at 3:07 pm

"Because people who watch Fox News repeat cliches and catch phrases over and over."

+1

I make it a point to tune into fix, and listen to Levine beck etc..

Ooof!!!


resident
Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 28, 2018 at 9:33 pm
resident, Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 28, 2018 at 9:33 pm

You need to look at history regarding colonization of Africa and other countries by the main EU countries who competed for colonizing anything on earth. After WW2 the colonized countries were able to pull away to establish their own identity. However in Africa the colonizing countries still control a lot of the commercial transactions. Who ever colonized a country should pick up the responsibility of assisting the countries that need help. Example Vietnam - colonized by France but we ended up fighting the war. And we now have the biggest Vietnamese contingent in our area. The US cannot be the ATM card for all of the countries that are in trouble. Africa is the second biggest continent on the planet - check it out on Wikipedia. France, Belgium, Germany, Italy and others profited by their colonization and they need to pick up the pieces of the countries that they left.
As to Mexico it has a long history with Mexico City being the biggest city in North America. They need to provide the health, education, and services to their citizens. We are not the ATM card for Mexico.


resident
Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 29, 2018 at 8:59 am
resident, Adobe-Meadow
on Mar 29, 2018 at 8:59 am

Newspapers have a political POV, however the larger papers still need to download the Associated Press which reports on key events around the world. Katherine Graham wrote an autobiography - Personal History - which explains the newspaper business which has to turn a profit to stay in business, offer a political opinion, and also report actual real news - a download from the Associated Press that is sold across the board reporting actual events in process. The problem as she explains is to not have a political POV which is in contrast to the actual news being reported. As of late the SFC, SJM, and Washington Post under the current ownership of Mr. Amazon appear mixed up as to what is going on in the world. In the SFC today - Page A2 News of the Day a number of African countries are under siege by Al Qaeda and other terrorist groups who appear to have a lot of funding to roam all over causing disruption to countries who are trying to form constructive governments with forward economic agendas. Is that important to you? Yes - the US Government is providing assistance in attempts to fight off the challenges to constructive government control of individual countries. In the NYT today Nicholas Kristoff is roaming all over Africa representing a non-profit supporting education - a good thing. But he fails to report on any discussion with the governments of the countries where he is roaming and prefers to castigate the US for not educating the children of Africa. He fails to recognize that all of those countries were colonies of a EU country, exception Ethiopia, who had and have a responsibility to provide assistance in education for their former colonies in which they still have commercial interests. The east coast states are former colonies of the UK, France and Spain. California is a former colony of Spain - that is why you have all of the missions. Different experience for west coast people. However the overall problem is that individual countries have to provide a government structure for the citizens which includes education, health, and some structure of government for the citizens. We need to support each countries attempts to that end instead of siphoning off their citizens which allows the disruption of the individual countries goals. The more we take on takes the burden off the countries to control their country goals. Yes - Mexico has problems which the Associated Press reports on a weekly basis but pressure to combat their problems needs to come from within that country. Fix the problems at origin - not in the middle in which has fallen apart. We have our financial problems regarding homelessness that we need to focus on.


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