News

City banks on cameras to help deter suicides on Caltrain tracks

New surveillance system would replace human guards along Palo Alto's 4-mile track segment

As Palo Alto's system for keeping pedestrians off the Caltrain tracks continues to evolve, city officials are shifting their focus from human monitors stationed at the tracks to computer monitors broadcasting camera footage at a distant site.

The City Council approved on Monday night a $1.4 million contract with the company G4S Secure Integration to design and construct a video-management system (which is expected to take six months) that would monitor tracks and transmit footage to a remote location, where it would be monitored. The change represents a major shift for the city's TrackWatch program, which was launched in 2009 in response to a cluster of teenage suicides and which was initially staffed by volunteer "track watchers."

In November 2009, the city began hiring security guards to monitor the tracks in seven-hour night shifts. For the first years, the guards were stationed only at the Charleston Road and East Meadow Drive crossings. The city later added Churchill Avenue and California Avenue stations and the Alma Street crossing at the northern end of the city's 4-mile track corridor. It also modified contracts to require security guards to provide 24-hour service at the tracks.

Now, the city is looking to replace security guards with a system that detects intrusion on the corridor with visible and thermal infrared cameras. The city began using such a system last summer on a pilot basis when it installed an "intrusion detection system" at the East Meadow Drive grade crossing. A report from the Community Services Department notes that evaluation of this system has shown this technology to be "superior to human monitors."

The biggest advantage is the cameras' ability to detect movement at night. The long-distance cameras and sensors combined with "detection algorithms" both provided "significantly longer viewing distance" and resulted in "much lower fatigue and stress on the monitor."

The report notes that during the evaluation period, the system was able to discern unsafe conditions that were missed by humans on-site in numerous instances.

"While it may or may not be true that a "human presence" at the tracks would provide a deterrent to someone contemplating suicide, it is absolutely clear that the IDS ("intrusion detection system) provides a more effective means of notifying law enforcement and Caltrain, especially in darkness."

The council approved the contract with G4S Secure Integration on its consent calendar, with no discussion or debate. Its Finance Committee had discussed the switch at its May 9 budget hearing, where City Manager James Keene called 2018 a "transition year" for Track Watch. Beyond the coming year, the city does not expect to have any more guards watching over the tracks.

Acting Police Chief Ron Watson told the Finance Committee at the hearing that while there is no "foolproof system anywhere," the camera system offer a distinct advantage over human guards, particularly at night.

"It is so dark out there that 50 or 100 feet away, they can't see anything, whereas, with the technology there will be some advantages on greater distances."

He noted that technology may be more useful in some areas of the 4-mile corridor than in others. For this reason, the city is using the "slow approach to really be strategic about where and when we reduce that coverage." In the most risky locations, the city will still have "multiple layers" of coverage between cameras and monitors.

Keene said that he does not expect the change to have any impact on response time to potential incidents. Contrary to popular perception, monitors are not authorized to physically intercede in the right-of-way. Rather, they call the Police Department if they see something amiss. The person monitoring the camera footage would follow the same protocol.

In addition to the one-time cost of $1.5 million for installing cameras at the four Palo Alto crossings, the city will also be spending about $325,000 annually for remote monitoring, maintenance and power. Today, the city spends about $1.7 million for human monitors at the tracks.

The city's effort to deter people from walking on the tracks (broadly known as "means restriction") is part of a broader community effort to address the recent clusters of teen suicides. After the 2009 incidents, the city joined the school district and community volunteers to launch Project Safety Net, a collaborative focused on youth well-being.

The new report from the Community Services Department (whose director, Rob de Geus, is part of the Project Safety Net effort), states that while there is evidence that reducing access to "means" prevents death by suicide, monitoring the tracks is not a panacea to the "complex and challenging issue of suicide prevention."

"Investment in the health and well-being of Palo Alto's youth and teens must be multi-faceted and, well beyond track security services, inclusive of community, school, parent and student efforts across the Palo Alto community, as seen in the work of Project Safety Net," the report states.

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Any person who is feeling depressed, troubled or suicidal can call 1-800-784-2433 to speak with a crisis counselor. People in Santa Clara County can call 1-855-278-4204. Spanish speakers can call 1-888-628-9454.

People can reach trained counselors at Crisis Text Line by texting 741741.

The link below provides more resources where one can receive help:

Resources: How to help those in crisis

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Follow the Palo Alto Weekly/Palo Alto Online on Twitter @PaloAltoWeekly and Facebook for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Comments

17 people like this
Posted by Sam Stevenson
a resident of College Terrace
on Jun 21, 2017 at 10:37 am

What is the new response time? How fast can the remote monitor get someone to clear the tracks?


28 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 21, 2017 at 10:43 am

Question: what percentage of local suicides are via train vs more traditional methods like guns or poisons or ropes or cars? I have to believe that the majority of suicides are by means other than trains. Investing all this money in reducing train suicide may be counterproductive if it reduces attention and resources from mental health programs.


19 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 21, 2017 at 11:09 am

Hopefully these cameras will also monitor the causes of cars "stalling" or whatever on the tracks and getting hit by trains. There seem to have been a lot of these incidents lately too.


57 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jun 21, 2017 at 11:46 am

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

Given the speed of the trains, the time it takes to detect an intrusion, the time it takes to report the detected intrusion and the time it takes to react to the warning of an intrusion the only use of the data produced by this system will be to record what happened after it is over.

Please let's stop trying to use technology as the panacea for dealing with more fundamental societal issues.


19 people like this
Posted by Parent
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Jun 21, 2017 at 12:02 pm

[Post removed.]


23 people like this
Posted by senor blogger
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jun 21, 2017 at 1:58 pm

I agree with Peter Carpenter. The trains are traveling at a minimum speed of 90 ft/sec. At that rate it would be virtually impossible to prevent any intrusion on the trackway.
There is a social solution to this problem. Let's keep searching until we find it.


43 people like this
Posted by Western Hillsider
a resident of Portola Valley
on Jun 21, 2017 at 2:24 pm

To me, this looks like wasted effort to make the public feel better. Give the schools the $2 million (or whatever) for beefed up counseling/mental health/parent training and assistance programs designed to prevent or defuse suicidal proclivities. If the intention
to take one's own life exists, neither human guards nor technical apparatus can solve, or even mitigate the problem.


6 people like this
Posted by wordhawk
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 21, 2017 at 3:23 pm

The sensors need to be mounted on the front of the trains and linked to monitors and sonic alarms in front of the engineers' eyes and ears. That way, they might have sufficient time to stop the train. Otherwise, Peter Carpenter's point seems correct: we will merely know what happened after it is over and a body lies dead or a vehicle smashed on the roadway.


19 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jun 21, 2017 at 3:29 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

When people step in front of a fast moving train there simply is not enough time to bring the train to a stop in time to avoid the person on the tracks and even attempting to do so may well endanger the train passengers.


4 people like this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jun 21, 2017 at 3:47 pm

Technical tidbit on emergency stopping a train -- if somehow you could lock all the wheels and have them adhered well to the rails rather than skidding, it would actually drag the tracks forward along with the train.


19 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 21, 2017 at 4:04 pm

Clearly, forcing the train into an emergency stop is a preposterous idea. Even when there is a huge car stopped on the tracks, slamming on the train's brakes will cause more casualties (mostly to train passengers) than just letting the train ram the car. The purpose of these cameras is to look for people behaving suspiciously and then dispatch a police officer to try to save them before the train comes. This is the same thing the current track monitor people do, though they are only located in a few places in the city.


18 people like this
Posted by Jay Ess
a resident of Los Altos
on Jun 21, 2017 at 4:13 pm

the only good it may do is stop the train in time and prevent the trauma of the driver who kills someone. And prevent the delay for the passengers. Mental health programs will do more in many cases

Spend the money on elevating the tracks and helping the traffic flow at crossings.


20 people like this
Posted by DTN Paul
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 21, 2017 at 6:05 pm

DTN Paul is a registered user.

This just seems like a collosal waste of money. It seems that a kid determined to kill themselves only needs to look on the internet to come up with another way to do so. And yet, millions will be spent...


2 people like this
Posted by Reality Check
a resident of another community
on Jun 21, 2017 at 6:19 pm


Of course! The scope must be expanded to include automated grade crossing camera enforcement of vehicle code violations which present an ever-present risk of a full-blown derailment train wreck caused by drivers habitually and illegally stopping (queuing) their vehicles across the tracks daily with near impunity, possibly killing innocent bystanders on nearby sidewalks, in other cars, aboard the train and even in their homes near the right of way.

Of course, trains forced to hit vehicles illegally stopped on the tracks by their scofflaw drivers typically do not derail ... but anytime a train hits a vehicle, there is a non-zero chance of a full-blown catastrophic derailment ... such as with the 2015 MetroLink Oxnard wreck caused by a pickup truck on the tracks.


15 people like this
Posted by Ahem
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 21, 2017 at 7:10 pm

@RC,

Caltrain is operating 1950's technology rolling stock, 1930's technology crossing barriers, in a modern congested environment, according to 100 year old federal regulations... but its all the fault of the one-in-million driver that accidentally gets caught on the tracks.

Caltrain is stuck in the past because the passenger-rail business model doesn't work. Caltrian has no profits to invest in R&D or technology and never will. The pace of technology continues to accelerates while Caltrain remains shackled to the past.




15 people like this
Posted by Safety theater
a resident of another community
on Jun 21, 2017 at 10:07 pm

Suicidal kids (and adults) have access to thousands of train crossings in communities across the country.

So why is Palo Alto the only community caught up in this costly feel-good "suicide safety theater"?


13 people like this
Posted by Larry Cohn
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jun 22, 2017 at 1:18 am

"forcing the train to an emergency stop is a preposterous idea. Even when there is a huge car stopped on the tracks, slamming on the train's brakes will cause more casualties (mostly to train passengers) than just letting the train ram the car."

Trains have the right of way under federal law. Get in the way of an oncoming train and you will pay a price. Yes, requiring the trains to stop is not feasible either legally or in practical terms.

When I grew up in Palo Alto in the '60s and '70s these kinds of accidents (train vs. ped and train vs. car) were totally unheard of because they practically never happened. Fast forward 50 years and there has been a major cultural shift in Palo Alto. I can't give my explanation here because it is considered politically incorrect and would probably be deleted. Nowadays these accidents happen several times per year vs. practically never in my time.

"why is Palo Alto the only community caught up in this costly feel-good 'suicide safety theater'?"

This is a crucial question. Why do we never hear about teen suicide clusters in Burlingame or Sunnyvale or Redwood City or pick any peninsula city through which Caltrain runs?

How many suicides have the crossing patrols actually prevented? Do they keep records of such things or are we spending money with no idea of the return on the investment in these guards? Or are we simply pouring money down the drain to feel better about the situation?

In Oxnard in 2015, the train engineer tragically died of the injuries he sustained in the accident and the driver of the vehicle which became stuck on the tracks has been charged with vehicular manslaughter. This makes a good case for grade separating trains and cars/trucks.

A classmate of mine was killed by an S.P. commute train at Palo Alto Avenue in 1971. He was a happy-go-lucky 16-year-old kid. He was waiting for a southbound train to pass before starting across the tracks on his bike. He started across the tracks but unbeknownst to him, a northbound train was approaching. The northbound train was obscured from his view by the southbound train. The northbound train struck and killed him. Tragically, that same scenario has occurred twice that I'm aware of at Jack London Square in Oakland.

One thing is certain: security cameras won't be burglarizing nearby homes.


10 people like this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jun 22, 2017 at 1:44 am

^ "When I grew up in Palo Alto ..." we kids played around (and on) the hopper cars stored on the siding at the cement yard just south of the Cal Ave station. The dangerous part was running across Alma Street to get there.


12 people like this
Posted by Gary Curtis
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jun 22, 2017 at 12:27 pm

Ridiculous...I don't see a point to that.


2 people like this
Posted by More Needed
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jun 22, 2017 at 1:11 pm

This is a good step in the right direction but until the person monitoring the cameras can call/radio the CalTrain train engineers to warn them its insufficient.


19 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jun 22, 2017 at 1:16 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

Even if " the person monitoring the cameras can call/radio the CalTrain train engineers to warn them" this system would be unable to prevent most suicides. People who commit suicide by train do not spend minutes standing in the railway.

There is no way that this system could prevent a death from someone standing at a crosswalk behind the lowered arm from simply stepping around the arm and into the path of the train.

Technology is NOT the answer - even if spending this much money makes some people feel better.


2 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jun 22, 2017 at 3:22 pm

The article addresses the concern regarding response time live person monitoring versus camera:

"Contrary to popular perception, monitors are not authorized to physically intercede in the right-of-way. Rather, they call the Police Department if they see something amiss. The person monitoring the camera footage would follow the same protocol."

So if the camera picks up something and automatically dials the police, it may be faster than the current system.

Just my guess, based on the article.


13 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jun 22, 2017 at 4:15 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

"So if the camera picks up something and automatically dials the police, it may be faster than the current system."

Being faster than the current so-called system simply is not good enough.


10 people like this
Posted by Oy, Weh!
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jun 22, 2017 at 4:21 pm

This is just s silly waste of money, totally ineffectual and useless.

Probably the best solution is grade separation... Sunnyvale has had it for eons!


2 people like this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jun 22, 2017 at 5:25 pm

^ Sunnyvale? You're kidding, right?


2 people like this
Posted by Larry Cohn
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jun 22, 2017 at 6:41 pm

Yes, Sunnyvale. The Mathilda Avenue crossing is grade separated near the Caltrain station. Even Sunnyvale has grade sep while Palo Alto runs around in circles, chasing its tail.

You could install a giant loudspeaker which blasts a message, "Hey you, get off the tracks". The neighbors wouldn't like it very well when it goes off at 1 am and it would do about as much good as security cameras. By the time the police arrive they can mop up the mess because the accident has already happened.


8 people like this
Posted by for Healthier High Schools
a resident of Gunn High School
on Jun 22, 2017 at 7:16 pm

In my book, and for my money, Mr. Carpenter is right on:

"Given the speed of the trains, the time it takes to detect an intrusion, the time it takes to report the detected intrusion and the time it takes to react to the warning of an intrusion the only use of the data produced by this system will be to record what happened after it is over."

I feel that the kids seeing that the community cares enough to have living human beings on watch at the tracks, not just machines, helps persuade them that we care about their lives.

It's like when your parent reads you a bedtime story when you're young--instead of just putting on a tape and leaving the room.

Which one gives you a sense of being protected, safe, watched over?

Sincerely,
Marc Vincenti
Gunn English Dept. (1995-2010)
Chairman, Save the 2,008--for Healthier High Schools


2 people like this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jun 22, 2017 at 7:20 pm

Palo Alto has 3 grade separations, four if you include San Antonio.
Sunnyvale Ave and Mary Ave are busier at-grade than any of ours.


Like this comment
Posted by Matthew Burt
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 22, 2017 at 9:11 pm

No, Palo Alto has four crossings—Alma, Churchill, Meadow, and Charleston. (San Antonio is a road bridge, so clearly doesn't count.) While other cities' crossings may or may not be busier, all four of ours run right next to Alma, which is what causes a lot of the vehicular congestion. And, of course, all four are close to schools, businesses, and homes that add substantial pedestrian traffic. Although expensive, I think (and hope) that grade separation is inevitable at this point.


2 people like this
Posted by Paly parent
a resident of Midtown
on Jun 22, 2017 at 9:14 pm

For all the naysayers, please take time to educate yourselves before jumping to conclusions (e.g., Web Link) And take note, this was piloted with distinct advantages and is envisioned as part of a strategic, multifaceted approach. I applaud the investment and effort.


11 people like this
Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jun 22, 2017 at 9:40 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

[Post removed.]


5 people like this
Posted by Larry Cohn
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jun 22, 2017 at 10:20 pm

"I feel that the kids seeing that the community cares enough to have living human beings on watch at the tracks, not just machines, helps persuade them that we care about their lives."

We needed none of this when I went to Paly from 1970 - 1973. During that time we had ZERO suicides -- same trains, same tracks, same schools, same crossings. We would have scoffed at the notion of signs, guards and cameras at the crossings.

What has changed in Palo Alto?


2 people like this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jun 22, 2017 at 10:49 pm

"What has changed in Palo Alto?"

Regarding mental health, that's the third-rail of online discussion.
I won't dare touch it here.


Like this comment
Posted by We are the leaders we have been waiting for.
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 23, 2017 at 12:07 pm

Please take time to study the complexity of a problem. Offer feasible solutions. Work in a civil way with fellow citizens and electeds to identify a path if you don't like the one we are on. If you are not willing to do that work, then give it a rest. You are not being helpful with barbs and nasty posts.

Bob Edgar once said, "We are the leaders we have been waiting for." BE a leader. Work with others to CREATE the community you want. Stop blaming and criticizing. It gets no one anywhere. It just brings everyone down.


Like this comment
Posted by Midtown
a resident of Midtown
on Jun 23, 2017 at 12:23 pm

This whole problem can be solved with 19th century technology. Concrete, rebar, dirt, rail and bulldozers. Won't require a wire anywhere (although positive train control will probably require sensors). It is called grade separation. And while you are at it plow another lane under the overpass on Embarcadero. How many more do we have to kill??? More band-aids are not the solution.


12 people like this
Posted by Ahem
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 23, 2017 at 1:36 pm

@Midtown,

Teen suicide is a social problem, not a technological problem. It will not be solved by technology from the 19th or 20th century. It will simple be forced into a less conspicuous venue.


5 people like this
Posted by Community
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 24, 2017 at 9:11 am

@leaders,
I appreciate your attempt to get people to be more constructive. It did not come across as an attack to try to silence others as often happens, and your points were quite apt -- in a perfect world, your prescription would be just the thing. On the other hand, having tried years of my life to address one important but completely overlooked aspect of this, with considerable evidence that it could make a bigger, more positive, holistic difference downstream for far less expense, and having faced tremendous and escalating hurtful pushback from within the school system, even retaliation, for what reason I still cannot fathom, I can say that telling people to be the leader is not really especially helpful either.

You are right, people say a lot of opinionated and ill-informed things above. But at least you can see what they are thinking. This is a chance for you to be a leader and inform, to work on persuading, to keep telling the truth people need to hear. Sometimes this is the only place left that people can safely say what they think around here. Yeah, it's a pain to keep correcting people, but that's the way things are in the world. But look at it this way, others will see both the ill-informed opinion and your constructive correction. It is an opportunity for you. You yourself would be a more effective leader if you developed the parience to do so. I would see someone patiently and lovingly correcting a lot of the misinformation now and persistently as a highly constructive act. Don't give up! But unfortunately, leadership never comes from that kind of admonishment.


14 people like this
Posted by Suicide Security Theater
a resident of Green Acres
on Jun 24, 2017 at 1:47 pm

Yet more feel-good symbolic spending that does as little to stop suicide and the guards. How long did people complain about the guards before the city finally got rid of the unvetted contractors who didn't properly vet their guards?

[Portion removed.]


7 people like this
Posted by Larry Cohn
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jun 24, 2017 at 2:50 pm

I'm still waiting for an answer to the question of how many suicides did the crossing guards actually prevent through their intervention? Does the city even keep records so they know what they're getting for the money they spend?


9 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Midtown
on Jun 25, 2017 at 10:48 pm

Hey at least it "created jobs" for the guards.

In all seriousness, what they've done to the tracks as a reaction to the suicides is deeply disturbing -- in how ineffective, fake, and artificial it is. Actions such as this -- irrational, mindblowing wasting of $$$ and resources -- the way they continue to spend money on this in an effort to repair Palo Alto's image is the exact reason people are committing suicide in the first place.

If they want more suicides, they can continue with this attitude... which completely disregards any possible VALID reasons people find to take their own lives -- depression actually has deep societal causes, it isn't some mysterious, individual mental disorder that can be magically "fixed" which is why psychiatric, antidepressant treatment plans are totally based on guesswork and often fail.

In my view, all the artificial barriers, signs, money spent, security cameras, guards, etc. etc. is deeply insulting to the memories of the kids who chose to take their own lives on the tracks. It doesn't attempt to understand them, instead assuming that CONTROLLING people some more is the right solution.


6 people like this
Posted by Online Name
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 25, 2017 at 11:11 pm

@Resident -- Great post!

[Portion removed.]


6 people like this
Posted by Reality
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Jun 27, 2017 at 12:07 am

Suicides also happen in high stress school districts such as Fremont and Cupertino, etc. We don't hear about them because they occur in private homes. PAUSD wants to be transparent with their communication, and when a train is delayed, they and the media cannot sweep it under the rug.


9 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 28, 2017 at 11:19 pm

" ...it is absolutely clear that the IDS ("intrusion detection system) provides a more effective means of notifying law enforcement and Caltrain, especially in darkness." .

I cannot count the times I've crossed the tracks on foot at the Alma crossing. I've witnessed countless others doing it. Not to mention bikes using the bike lanes that cross the rails. The cameras will report intruders every minute. Now what?

So someone stops and stands in front of an oncoming train. The camera rings the bell in the "remote monitoring location." Now what? Dispatch Superman to the rescue from the "remote monitoring location"?

No, all you get is a few seconds of really ghoulish video. Keep my tax dollars away from that.

This is incredibly idiotic, even by city hall standards. Those techno-dazzled [deleted by author] have too much money and too little sense.


2 people like this
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jun 29, 2017 at 12:45 am

Stopped behind (well-behind) a car today with its nose too near the tracks eastbound Meadow. Parked there for 90 seconds before the light turned green. The crossing guard was oblivious. A train would have replayed the Churchill incident of May 22, though I expect the guy would somehow have maneuvered off before the crossing arm could crease his roof.

So... What would a camera do with this very frequent situation?


1 person likes this
Posted by Bobby
a resident of Mayfield
on Jun 29, 2017 at 8:59 am

All I can say is,what about the danger of our streets too!I have experienced much rude behavior from drivers on the pedestrians and cyclists,who will not yield to walkers in the crosswalks.In SF I had one driver blast his horn at me on the shoulder on Division there,totally illegal to do,PEOPLE share the road,it's easier to drive than walk,and what can this state do to make moving around better?


9 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 29, 2017 at 12:37 pm

"So... What would a camera do with this very frequent situation?"

YouTube footage.


7 people like this
Posted by Kvetch
a resident of Evergreen Park
on Jun 29, 2017 at 1:22 pm

@Bobby, of course people are getting more rude. That's what happens when you try to shove too many rats into a cage.

As traffic continues to worsen, yielding to pedestrians and the irregular triggering of red lights by pedestrians will have to become a thing of the past because of unpredictable traffic flow and cars unexpectedly stuck in intersections.

As for the cameras, maybe they can move them to the Middlefield/Oregon and El Camino / Embarcadero intersections where they can at least help "monitor" all the cars that get stuck in the intersections on a daily basic.


8 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Jun 29, 2017 at 7:07 pm

Our fair city says it must cut $1,300,000 from the fire department Web Link , yet it easily finds $1,400,000 for this glitzy toy.


Posted by Name hidden
a resident of Addison School

on Sep 26, 2017 at 10:47 am

Due to repeated violations of our Terms of Use, comments from this poster are automatically removed. Why?


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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