News

East Palo Altans prepare for possible deportations

East Palo Alto residents, groups gird themselves for potential immigration raids

On the afternoon of Feb. 24 the usually lively streets of East Palo Alto were mostly empty. But the city and its residents were frenetic along other avenues.

Nearly a month to the day after President Donald Trump issued Executive Order 13768 seeking to deport tens of thousands of "removable aliens," the internet was abuzz with warnings that federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents had been spotted at a local gas station. Agents in dark blue jackets and khaki pants had supposedly been asking a Latino man for his documentation. ICE vehicles were allegedly seen at another gas station at the corner of University Avenue and East Bayshore Road — a checkpoint, people conjectured. Other residents thought ICE agents were in vans in front of elementary schools, awaiting parents who might be undocumented to arrive to pick up their children.

All of these rumors now appear to be unfounded, according to police and an ICE spokesman. But dozens of parents called the Ravenswood City School District offices that day, compelling the school district to convene a March 2 community meeting to quell fears.

"Parents called and thought that ICE was outside of the schools; it was tree trimmers from the City of East Palo Alto who were doing maintenance work across the street. People pulled their kids out of school," Superintendent Gloria Hernandez-Goff said.

The rumors — and how quickly they spread — point to a population of immigrants who are not only afraid but who don't know their rights or whom they can trust. Two-thirds of East Palo Alto's 28,155 residents are immigrants, both legal and undocumented, with 61.6 percent being Latino and 10.9 percent Pacific Islanders, according to city data. Feeling isolated, they are fearful of schools, the city, police or others who might turn them or their family members over to immigration authorities.

In response, East Palo Altans, community and faith groups have been coming together to educate each other about their civil rights. They are forming watchdog coalitions to monitor ICE actions and setting up sanctuaries in their homes for families suddenly in crisis or who need a place to hide.

Some of the strongest advocates are undocumented residents themselves, who've taken it upon themselves to teach others about their rights.

Laura, a mother of two who does not want her last name published because of her immigration status, arrived in the U.S. nearly 16 years ago. She made her way over barbed wire and hid in the cold desert night in an abandoned vehicle and then in safe houses in Los Angeles — a sort of underground railroad to the "promised land."

On one of her tries, the smugglers, or "coyotes," sent Laura to a dark house in a bad part of Mexicali, where she was told to remain silent. About 100 people were crowded inside the residence, she recalled. When the signal came to run for the fence, she was the second person to climb over it. But she was near panic, fearing she would be caught, when a large searchlight swung in her direction, she said. Suddenly, a man reached out his hand and pulled her to safety.

"To this day I don't know why he did that. He could have just kept running," she said.

That incident is now a metaphor for the work she is doing to help people stay on the northern side of the barbed wire: It's about reaching out to others even if you don't know who they are, she said.

Now she gives talks at schools and community meetings for local community group Comite Latino, which offers fellowship and information to the Latino community and organizes the annual Cinco de Mayo festival.

"The first thing when I came here, I was afraid to go out because I didn't feel I had rights. Now I know I can fight for my rights, and I can fight for others, too," Laura said. "My brother says, 'You have to be careful; you are too political and you are without papers.' But that doesn't matter. If you can help the community, that is OK. They can help me, too."

Chela, a 26-year U.S. resident who also asked that her last name be withheld, is also helping other undocumented immigrants. She has the rock-solid demeanor of a wise grandmother, a direct gaze and easy smile. Her rough hands show years of menial labor as a janitor, seamstress and restaurant worker. But she also trains and choreographs dances for quinceaneras, the coming-out parties for 15-year-old girls, and she teaches a local folklorico dance group. In the schools, she volunteered as an ambassador for families with children with disabilities.

Well-known and trusted in the community, Chela acts as a bridge between organizations that want to help and leery immigrants who desperately need information. She hands out leaflets for meetings sponsored by Comite Latino and makes phone calls, and she is helping to coordinate immigrant-resources booths for the upcoming Cinco de Mayo celebration.

"I worry about working people and families with small children and those with disabilities," she said.

"It is definitely important to defend oneself and to know what to answer when you are asked questions. People need to know their rights," she said.

She said recent fears over deportation have a silver lining: "It is bringing different kinds of people together to get past the prejudice found in different ethnic groups and traditions."

Trust comes first

East Palo Alto Vice Mayor Ruben Abrica said that people like Chela are important because they have history in the neighborhood.

"People listen to her," said Abrica, who cofounded Comite Latino.

Building trust is the basis for everything else, he said. But it isn't easy. There's a fundamental mistrust of authorities in some immigrant communities based on past bad experiences in their native countries and in the United States. Some people aren't accessing the services they need because they don't trust the programs' providers.

"We are starting to see people declining services out of fear," Iliana Rodriguez, human services agency director for the County of San Mateo, said she has heard anecdotally at the Feb. 28 Comite Latino "Know Your Rights" meeting. The caseload for CalFresh supplemental food-assistance has dropped, for example, she later said, although she did not have hard numbers.

Victoria Tinoco of Community Legal Services in East Palo Alto agreed. The nonprofit organization offers free legal help to residents, including services related to immigration law.

"People say they are afraid to talk to us because they are afraid we are working with ICE. No!" she said. Community Legal Services clients are protected by attorney-client privilege, she told the crowd.

At the school district's emergency meeting on March 2 at Costano Elementary School, nearly 200 people gathered in the gymnasium.

Hernandez-Goff, flanked by representatives from the East Palo Alto and Menlo Park police departments and the Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office, described how the district will handle any ICE agents who might come to the schools.

The district Board of Education unanimously adopted a resolution on Feb. 23 that makes clear that district resources, including employees, will not be used to enforce civil immigration law. The district and staff will not collect or share any information regarding documentation or citizenship status for the federal government and will not take part in any registry, she said.

"Many of our staff are immigrants. And guess what? They are afraid too," she said.

"If ICE comes to the school's office, they are to be sent to the district office or I will come to the school and our lawyer will meet me there," she said.

Some parents said they fear that ICE agents might follow the school bus. But drivers who see someone following them have been instructed not to drop any child off; they are to bring the child back to the district office and a parent will be contacted, Hernandez-Goff said. Children will not be left alone, and the district will keep calling persons authorized to pick up a child until someone can be reached, she said.

Parents should have a plan for custody of their children in the event they are detained by ICE, however, and they should update any cards at the school indicating who will be allowed to take their children from the campus. Absent a designated adult, children could end up in the foster-care system, she said.

Hernandez-Goff said that the large turnout at the Costano meeting gave her hope.

"It shows that people are willing to come out and are asking questions of the district and of the police. I give them big kudos. Now they are getting a little feisty," she said.

To reach more families, the district is setting up small-group "cafecitos" where parents can meet over coffee and ask more personalized questions, she said.

One parent, Marco Duarte, is also training others through the district's Family Leadership Institute Migrant Committee. The committee helps parents to understand their rights, ask questions and get results. The group has a phone tree to call parents and keep them informed.

Duarte stressed the importance of safety in numbers.

"We need everybody on the bus. We don't want to feel disadvantaged as a minority," he said.

Building rapid-response teams, safe havens

Inevitably, people will be picked up by ICE. One East Palo Alto resident — a parishioner at the city's St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church — was deported after trying to re-enter the country at San Francisco International Airport, according to pastor Fr. Lawrence Goode.

When ICE comes calling, volunteers who have formed "rapid-response teams" will convene at the scene to witness the action.

Faith In Action Bay Area has trained nearly 1,000 people in San Mateo and San Francisco counties to jump into action when there is news of an ICE encounter.

On March 20, more than 70 people arrived at St. Francis of Assisi to learn about training as legal observers, moral witnesses, family-support personnel and accompaniment teams.

Jennifer Martinez, executive director of the San Francisco-based organization, said the strategy has already been used in San Francisco and has helped prevent several dozen deportations. Now it is being scaled up.

On March 27 the organization opened a rapid-response hotline for people to report ICE encounters. When the call comes in, a team of volunteers will go to the site of the action to document any abuses by authorities. The witnesses can confirm if ICE is on scene or dispel any rumors if another law-enforcement agency is there, such as a parole officer. A legal representative will arrive to ensure that the person's rights are not being violated and either offer representation or direct the person to legal services.

The volunteers will help families and individuals in crisis by providing food, rides to appointments and connections to social and mental health services.

"We're training enough people to have a 24/7 response," Martinez said. "The bright spot in all of this is the amount of people who have come to say they want to stand up for human rights and dignity.

"In my 15 years of organizing, I have never had a time when we opened the doors and 1,000 people walked through in a matter of weeks," she said.

Rapid-response attorneys are an especially important component of the volunteer network. Immigrants facing arrest and deportation can be expelled rapidly from the country, often before a hearing or before they can offer an argument against deportation, such as being victims of crime, said Ilyce Shugall, directing attorney of the immigration program at Community Legal Services in East Palo Alto.

"There are certain categories of individuals that ICE doesn't have to bring before an immigration judge and can just bring an immigration order. The Interior Enforcement executive order does suggest that they will use those provisions to the fullest extent possible," she said.

The broad language in the executive order implies that enforcement could be used against a wide swath of immigrants who are not in the country legally. Shugall is particularly concerned that some Mexican nationals who may be eligible to stay in the U.S. will be arrested and deported — someone who failed to appear for a hearing because he or she never received notice after the court got the address wrong, for example.

Undocumented Mexicans get deported quickly, she said, since Mexico is just a bus ride away — unlike someone from a more distant country, who would be more costly to deport.

Community Legal Services is hiring additional staff for its immigration program to address the increased number of people in need and to stay abreast of the changing laws. The organization used to help students apply for protection under the Deferred Action Childhood Arrivals (DACA), but it has stopped taking new applicants because through the executive order it appears that Trump intends to revoke DACA, she said.

Another movement within the community is offering safe havens or sanctuaries for individuals who are clearly at risk for deportation. Volunteers are offering a room, food or transportation to the homes of the person's relatives and friends in another city, so the person being sought can hide.

It's a risky move to provide a safe house, though.

"That can be considered alien harboring under federal criminal law," Shugall said.

But some persons in the sanctuary movement said they are willing to take the risk.

One volunteer said she plans to house one to two adults or a family of four or five at her home.

As to the personal risk: "It is always real," she said.

"I don't want to say it's an underground railroad for immigrants," she added when describing the services the groups offers, but in essence that is what it might become. She has a room ready and will wait for a call from a network — a call she hopes will never have to come for the sake of the immigrants involved, she said.

The volunteer said there are times in history when it is not enough to be self-protective. Her own family history with the Holocaust informed her decision, she said.

"I grew up in a family where the first thing that comes to mind when meeting a new friend is, 'Would you hide me?'" she said.

"It's a very real question. Would I help my friends, my family and my neighbors? It's the cost of membership in humanity. ... And if we're not willing to do that, what kind of society are we?"

Laura, the undocumented immigrant, said she is also setting a good example for her teenage daughter about fighting for one's rights, being self-educated and helping others.

"I have listened a long time about bad things about East Palo Alto. But if we work together — I don't care if we are three or four small people — we can change things. My priority is to work with the new generation. They are our future," she said.

---

Follow the Palo Alto Weekly/Palo Alto Online on Twitter @PaloAltoWeekly and Facebook for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Comments

62 people like this
Posted by 38 year resident
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 21, 2017 at 11:58 am

When will the fear mongering stop? People on the left will say or do anything to taint the presidency of Donald Trump.


76 people like this
Posted by john_alderman
a resident of Crescent Park
on Apr 21, 2017 at 12:32 pm

john_alderman is a registered user.

I think Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said it really well this week, ""If lawmakers do not like the laws that we enforce, that we are charged to enforce, that we are sworn to enforce, then they should have the courage and the skill to change those laws. Otherwise, they should shut up and support the men and women on the front lines.""


29 people like this
Posted by AntiFearMongeringRepublican
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Apr 21, 2017 at 12:42 pm

To 38 year resident:

I am a lifelong conservative registered Republican who detests fear-mongering. The reality is that Donald Trump made fear mongering a central aspect of his political campaign by smearing ethnic minorities, branding them rapists and criminals. Although he initially suggested that ICE would not deport DACA immigrants, and would focus on dangerous criminals, it is obvious from his actions that he is not constrained by what he said. The reporter seems to be writing about actual community fears, which are a direct result of Trump's actions and policies. I was brought up speaking my immigrant parents' (non-Hispanic) language and I don't live in East Palo Alto but if I could converse with the non English-speaking members of the EPA community, I believe I'd find that the article's depiction of the community's fears as a result of Trump's actions is accurate.


30 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of College Terrace
on Apr 21, 2017 at 1:07 pm

here.we.go.again.

I'm willing to bet:

1. Much of what people are going to post will be scrubbed by the moderator (the First Amendment doesn't apply on paloaltoonline, folks)

2. [Portion removed.]

3. This thread will inevitably be shut down

***puts popcorn in microwave***


4 people like this
Posted by @Resident
a resident of Mountain View
on Apr 21, 2017 at 1:15 pm

[Post removed.]


80 people like this
Posted by Legal Immigrant
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 21, 2017 at 1:23 pm

I immigrated here 30+ years ago. It took my parents 10+ years of waiting and processing. But we came here legally. I am sick and tired of reading about how these "ILLEGAL" immigrants deserve to stay! No matter what, they're "ILLEGALS"! GO BACK and if you really want to come back - come back legally!


5 people like this
Posted by DZ
a resident of Terman Middle School
on Apr 21, 2017 at 1:30 pm

AntiFearMongeringRepublican,
[Portion removed.] Your "ethnic minorities" is actually majority in CA!


5 people like this
Posted by vh
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Apr 21, 2017 at 1:59 pm

[Post removed.]


11 people like this
Posted by chris
a resident of University South
on Apr 21, 2017 at 2:39 pm

Sometimes laws make things worse. Look how much H1-B visas have been abused.

Most of the illegals are doing work citizens refuse to do at any price, yet the Trumpistas refuse to make them legal.

Considering the heath care and budget problems, why are we wasting time on immigration, which is trivial problem compared to budget and health care?

Immigration is mostly an issue for lefties and righties to agitate their supporters. Do you really think those 2 extremes will come to a reasonable compromise? Dream on (pun intended).


59 people like this
Posted by john_alderman
a resident of Crescent Park
on Apr 21, 2017 at 3:33 pm

john_alderman is a registered user.

"illegals are doing work citizens refuse to do at any price"

The truth is that illegals take jobs that corporations (and rich palo altans) are too cheap to pay market rate for. You can absolutely find a citizen willing to be a nanny, do your gardening, or work in a meat packing facility. But why would you hire a citizen when you can pay 1/2 or 1/3 the price and avoid all the complicated tax paperwork. Same story for most IT H-1Bs, they are replacing slightly more expensive legal workers, and allowing corporations to dodge paperwork and responsibility by hiring via outsources like Wipro.


6 people like this
Posted by Hmmm
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Apr 21, 2017 at 3:45 pm

[Post removed.]


2 people like this
Posted by Jay
a resident of Menlo Park
on Apr 21, 2017 at 5:02 pm

Wonderful to see people coming together to help people who need it. Thank you for sharing how we can get involved.


10 people like this
Posted by Hmmm
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Apr 21, 2017 at 7:13 pm

Why are some commenters foaming at the mouth about this issue, which barely affects them?


54 people like this
Posted by Nayeli
a resident of Midtown
on Apr 21, 2017 at 8:48 pm

I sympathize with those who want to live here (and I have more sympathy for those who were born here or brought here when they were very young). After all, my parents gathered us together with (literally) the clothes that we were wearing and moved to the United States once our papers were approved.

However, my sympathy stops far short of the point where I think that foreign citizens who immigrated to this country illegally have any "right" to be in this country.

Simply put: If you're not here legally, then you simply don't have a right to be here. I would argue that every other nation on this planet has more rigid immigration laws than the United States (including Mexico).

If you fear being deported, then become a legal resident. If you can't become a legal resident because you entered this nation illegally, then return to the country of your citizenship and apply to legally move here. While you're waiting to hear back, demand the types of reforms that would prevent millions from moving to the U.S.


2 people like this
Posted by American born
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Apr 21, 2017 at 8:57 pm

Actually Nayeli your statement that you do not have right to be here if you are here illegally is incorrect. Even trump says so
Web Link
[Portion removed.]


9 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 21, 2017 at 9:06 pm

"People on the left will say or do anything to taint the presidency of Donald Trump."

Yup. And DJT is their star performer.


"Considering the heath care and budget problems, why are we wasting time on immigration, which is trivial problem compared to budget and health care?"

It keeps Trump's Base all worked up and distracted so they don't notice they're being royally Boston whitefished on the side.


"Simply put: If you're not here legally, then you simply don't have a right to be here."

As I have to periodically remind my readers, these people are totally legal per the highest law in capitalism: The Market. Employer wants cheap labor, "undocumenteds" supply cheap labor. Only hardcore socialist-leaning lefties interfere with The Market.


28 people like this
Posted by Martha
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 22, 2017 at 10:32 am

Great comments by Nayeli, Mr. Alderman, Legal Immigrant and many others! So many great comments by all the clear headed folks supporting legal immigration and calling out the benefits of our country upholding our legal immigration system and laws! [Portion removed.]

We can certainly improve our immigration systems based on current day realities and real labor market needs, systems can always be improved. Yet clearly the best thing for our country and all those who wish to come here is to keep it a legal process and support enforcement of these laws.

Wake up local and State of California elected Democrats: the pendulum is swinging back towards rule of law! Please do your job for the people and follow the rule of law, or we will elect those who will.


25 people like this
Posted by Martha
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 22, 2017 at 11:06 am

Dear Resident,

I've also experienced being censored by this PA Online moderator. It's a wake up call to all of us how precious our First Amendment is and how we must redouble our efforts to assert and protect these hard fought rights since first achieved in 1780s by our great founders.

Let's keep up the good fight!


6 people like this
Posted by Sanctuary
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 22, 2017 at 11:24 am

I hate to rain on your parade, Martha, but you may want to check out how Trump performed in California, and that was before he started flailing around. The less said about how he did in Santa Clara County, or Palo Alto, the better. [Portion removed.]


27 people like this
Posted by Another Legal Immigrant
a resident of Palo Verde
on Apr 22, 2017 at 1:01 pm

I am here legally. To do so I had to undergo background checks, get fingerprinted, have a strict medical and to sign that I would carry around my documentation and show it to any US government official who asked to see it. I agreed to all this. I also had to pay for legal services and spend time at the US Embassy in my home country.

I pay taxes, have a SSN and Drivers License, and I get paid the going rate. In fact, I would not work for less.

Please stop putting illegal immigrants and those on H1b visas in the same category.

Getting green cards and citizenship maybe what many immigrants want but it is not easy in both time and money.

But it is important to be legal to set the right example to children and others. America is not the most wonderful country in the world, it has its problems, but the truth is that many people come here for many different reasons and people should not be categorized together. Those of us who have immigrated, be it for a short time or for life, do not feel threatened by authorities if we have done it all legally. Our experience of living and working here will always stand by us and if we move on elsewhere - not that I have any such thoughts at present, it will be part of who we are and what we become.

Bottom line is that everybody wants to improve their circumstances, but doing it any way other than legally is a bad way to live and the only way to sleep well at night.


4 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 22, 2017 at 3:38 pm

"Please stop putting illegal immigrants and those on H1b visas in the same category."

Tell that to Trump. He is systematically obsoleting the line separating them.

The reality is Trump won over the Republican Base by pledging to remove and keep out Mexicans, and to build a wall on the border as a monument to that movement. Everybody in The Base understands that "Mexican" means dark-skinned.

The roundup has begun, ostensibly against criminals. With its momentum established, the lines between "illegal," "legal," and naturalized will quietly fade and disappear. The Base wants racial cleansing. Trump and Sessions don't mind satisfying them.

So, H1b, green card, naturalized, native born (think Judge Gonzalo Curiel): those pieces of paper you got are just pieces of paper. What matters is your skin tone.

Advice: make living arrangements elsewhere while you have the choice.

And don't shoot the messenger. Save your energy for the perps.


14 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Apr 22, 2017 at 5:31 pm

Excuse me - but there are many citizens of Mexico and South American countries that are not Latino - they are from Europe and came west during the various wars. Carlos Slim - one of richest men on planet who owns most Mexican companies is from Lebanon - his parent came during the breakup of the Ottoman Empire. He is working to upgrade the symbolic buildings in Mexico as well as extend his reach through to Europe and New York.

If you want to go to Mexico on vacation you have to get permits at the border. What a novel idea that when they come north they have to get a permit at the border for a short term visit, visa for long term.

The California budget keeps moving money around from one voted on task to the illegal immigration tasks with no vote from the citizens. California is playing fast and loose with this topic to the detriment of the other tasks that are required to get done - like the flood victims in Santa Clara valley. No one really cares about racial cleansing - we care about the rule of law where everyone is working with the same set of principles.

I grew up in LA at a time when there was a solid middle class - all schools had a combination of colors and it all worked well - you could fit the requirements on a 3x5 card - do well in school, go to college or a trade school. The difference is that there was manufacturing so everyone had a place to work at all skill levels. Now California has taxed manufacturing companies out of the state so a lot of people do not have places to work. Trump is trying to fix that and Brown and company are tryin to stop him by raising more taxes. Since I have worked at large companies most of my life we had a great group of people of all colors - the requirement is to work as good, accomplished team mates. Color irrelevant.


2 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 22, 2017 at 5:52 pm

"Excuse me - but there are many citizens of Mexico and South American countries that are not Latino - they are from Europe and came west during the various wars."

Excuuuse me - the word Latino derives from the Latin roots of the Spanish language, which came from Europe. Spanish is not the indigenous language of Mexico, or anywhere in the Americas. Latinos are precisely those you deny--immigrants from Europe and their descendants. But so what? What's that got to do with this topic?


"Now California has taxed manufacturing companies out of the state so a lot of people do not have places to work. Trump is trying to fix that..."

I'll be ready to believe Trump is "fixing" American manufacturing when First Daughter Ivanka moves her clothing manufacturing operation from China to the USA. You got any word on her schedule for that? NO? Excessive hypocrisy in that Trump family, wot?


6 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 22, 2017 at 6:12 pm

@Curmudgeon

How about regarding your fellow citizens simply as Americans, and taking one individual at a time, instead of constantly referring to ethnicity and skin color?

Americanism is about individuality.

[Portion removed.]

The real issue is the language barrier. There needs to be some sense of unity to have a peaceful community, but it's a problem when people refuse to learn English and we can't communicate.


21 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Apr 22, 2017 at 6:12 pm

Would anyone like to guess what our world would look like if HRC won? Daughter Chelsea would be front and center in the white house with some job to promote her to be the following woman president. So now Chelsea is on the book author tour soon to be here. She has to have a job doing something other than the money-laundering foundation. And she may want to run for office in New York.

Rather than attacking Trump and family who are very smart, talented, well-educated people think about the alternative choices. Are you trying to say that HRC, Bill, Huma, and the Weiner would be better representatives for us on the world scene? Don't think so.


21 people like this
Posted by Martha
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 22, 2017 at 6:50 pm

Dear "Sanctuary", if that is really a name?

"hate to rain on your parade, Martha, but you may want to check out how Trump performed in California, and that was before he started flailing around. The less said about how he did in Santa Clara County, or Palo Alto, the better"

Oh my dear, you could never rain on my parade! I'm in 7th heaven knowing President Trump is in office! He is doing too many great things to even cover here. [Portion removed.]

Please look at the facts about the "great" State of California, it is teetering on complete bankruptcy, it has the highest (by some data) and nearly the highest ( by other data) poverty rates in the country. Try best you can to have some empathy for your fellow Americans (assuming you are a citizen or legal immigrant), and if you do, if you can possibly get your head out of the Palo Alto bubble, you might observe that all Americans, and international citizens in waiting, want and deserve the safety and security of legal immigration systems.

Of course I would never expect that the elites in Palo Alto would ever truly care for our many millions of Americans suffering in drug and crime infested neighborhoods, including many influences from both Asia (ingredients!) and Mexico and Central America (the traffickers and dealers). Wake up people! Get informed about the reality on the ground!

As for President Trump, he has done more for our country in the past 100 days than Obama did in his eight useless years.

[Portion removed.]

God bless America! My ancestors fought and died for our freedoms since the 1600s here in the great USA. I will forever fight for the freedoms they died to protect!


9 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Apr 22, 2017 at 6:52 pm

Way back when in California the Burbank Airport was Lockheed Martin building planes. The Santa Monica Airport was McDonnell Douglas that moved to Huntington Beach for the various space programs. LAUSD Hamilton High School - predomitly black was all-city basketball, all- city track, had a superb marching band, and they got a lot of scholarships to 4 year schools. They were in the "rich black" section of LA. We all had the same marching orders - do well in school, go to community college while you work, and then go onto a 4 year school. Seemed to work for a lot of people. And there were technical schools for people who did not want a traditional college degree - like musicians and chefs. It was all there - where is it now? the big blue state is not working well right now - is it?


8 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 22, 2017 at 7:00 pm

"Would anyone like to guess what our world would look like if HRC won?"

Aw get real. Can't you accept that DJT lost the popular vote by 3 million, but won the Electoral College by an exratraordinary majority matched or exceeded by only 8 of 10 presidents in history, and that makes DJT president? Deal in reality, willya?


"The real issue is the language barrier."

No sweat. Demographers project the USA will be the largest Spanish-speaking nation on the planet by midcentury. Stick around.


"Rather than attacking Trump and family who are very smart, talented, well-educated people think about the alternative choices."

Look, First Daughter Ivanka's factory jobs are staying in China, not coming to Indiana, Wisconsin, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, or any of the Rust Belt states whose voters naively believed the First Father would bring back manufacturing jobs to the USA from China. If Daddy can't lay down the law to Daughter, how can Daddy make Ford, GM, USX, and the rest toe the line? Hypocrisy, thy name is Trump.


Like this comment
Posted by resident
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Apr 22, 2017 at 7:28 pm

Hey - how about GM in Venezuela? That is not turning out so well - is it? Venezuela is going to take the factory and what ever is there - dam the company and the US. All of the cars that are sitting there now - all of the equipment. Strange - foreign countries have a habit of doing things like this - don't they. And blame it on TRUMP? He is not yet up to the 100 days. Blame it on GM who made bad decisions. NAFTA did not include Venezuela.
I have Ford stock that is going no where. I used to work for Ford Aerospace & Communications in Palo Alto which is now SSP. Loral bought FACC because we had a huge pension fund - and had to sue over that. And it all went bankrupt and was bought by someone else. What a tax nightmare this all was.
Bottom line - It didn't matter what color anyone was - we all had good educations and worked well together - it had nothing to do with sexual orientation. We are all connected on FB and support know how good we all are.


Like this comment
Posted by Sanctuary
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 22, 2017 at 7:47 pm

[Post removed.]


Like this comment
Posted by Sigh
a resident of Mountain View
on Apr 22, 2017 at 8:01 pm

[Post removed.]


Like this comment
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 22, 2017 at 8:07 pm

"Hey - how about GM in Venezuela? That is not turning out so well - is it? Venezuela is going to take the factory and what ever is there - dam the company and the US."

Yeah. They wouldn't dare try that if Trump was president.


Like this comment
Posted by resident
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Apr 22, 2017 at 8:23 pm

[Post removed.]


Like this comment
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 22, 2017 at 8:32 pm

[Post removed.]


8 people like this
Posted by Sanctuary
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 22, 2017 at 8:48 pm

resident, you may want to check your logic on that. Your boy doesn't go to his own properties for free. Just as with any other travel, the federal government is paying those properties. So on top of going every weekend unlike his predecessors, he's enriching himself with our money at the same time. The travel expenses so far are already almost the entire Obama vacation travel budget for his eight years. These are just the facts.


Like this comment
Posted by Resident
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 22, 2017 at 9:59 pm

[Post removed.]


Like this comment
Posted by There It Is
a resident of Midtown
on Apr 22, 2017 at 10:26 pm

[Post removed.]


17 people like this
Posted by Nayeli
a resident of Midtown
on Apr 22, 2017 at 10:59 pm

Remember: Most California residents oppose the concept of "sanctuary cities" or "sanctuary counties:"

Web Link


1 person likes this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 23, 2017 at 7:55 am

[Post removed.]


Like this comment
Posted by There It Is
a resident of Midtown
on Apr 23, 2017 at 8:35 am

[Post removed due to deletion of referenced comment.]


7 people like this
Posted by Martha
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 23, 2017 at 10:36 am

Dear Sanctuary,

No, I'm not a "fanatic." I simply believe in upholding rule of law and protecting the borders of the United States.

Back to the fundamental topic here, and one we should all strive our best to discuss in a civil and polite manner.

Sanctuary, I request you please put forth a valid argument in support of sanctuary city policies, if that is your actual POV.

This latest article about immigrants not knowing their rights amid rumors of ICE deportations keeps the current debate and conversation about immigration policies in the forefront of our community discussion here.

There are many American citizens and legal immigrants who all believe strongly in the value of having and upholding sound immigration laws and public policies, including me. This camp also believes that California State and local elected officials ought to follow the federal immigration laws and not create obstructions for ICE in doing its job.

Please, provide a sound argument for breaking the immigration laws of the United States. I'd greatly appreciate the opportunity to provide the reason and logic behind the right side of that argument, and why the promotion of sanctuary city and sanctuary state policies in California only promote degradation of rule of law overall for everyone.

Please provide reasons and facts, and at least state clearly your actual POV. Do you actually believe California State and local gov elected officials ought to be promoting sanctuary State and sanctuary city policies, and if so why?

Thank you kindly,



7 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Apr 23, 2017 at 10:50 am

Senator Kevin Deleon promoted the bill for Sanctuary Cities which define our "values".
He was born in San Diego and has a good educational background. He represents the LA downtown and East LA. In his Wikipedia web page he says that the majority of his relatives would be deported because they have false identification, false social security cards, false green cards - but hey - that is what is required to live in LA. From where I am sitting he is trying to legalize his own relatives so this is a self serving effort.


4 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 23, 2017 at 4:29 pm

"In his Wikipedia web page he says that the majority of his relatives would be deported because they have false identification, false social security cards, false green cards..."

Exactly. Papers are meaningless. For that reason this deportation business will quickly devolve to its base objective: deporting everybody with dark skin.

That's why sanctuaries are vital. Resist now, while you can.


2 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 23, 2017 at 4:31 pm

"Remember: Most California residents oppose the concept of "sanctuary cities" or "sanctuary counties:" "

Pray that turns around, for your own sake if nothing else.


4 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Apr 23, 2017 at 4:41 pm

This topic is about the rule of law - and papers are important. I assume you have a mortgage and deed to your house that are backed up paper. Other wise we could direct all of the sanctuary traffic to your house and assume that it is free to go. Most people have to some type of identification -usually a driver's license. In some cases only a passport. That is the first thing that anyone requests when you sign into a hotel, rent a car at a vacation spot. A ticket to get on a plane. That has nothing to do with skin color - it has to do with someone making the effort to follow the requirements to complete an action.


4 people like this
Posted by john_alderman
a resident of Crescent Park
on Apr 23, 2017 at 4:45 pm

john_alderman is a registered user.

" Papers are meaningless. For that reason this deportation business will quickly devolve to its base objective: deporting everybody with dark skin."

Pretty easy to see which side is fear mongering.. SAD


2 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Barron Park
on Apr 23, 2017 at 5:21 pm

[Post removed.]


8 people like this
Posted by Nayeli
a resident of Midtown
on Apr 23, 2017 at 5:28 pm

@ Curmudgeon: Why should I be afraid of cities following the law? I am now a U.S. citizen. I followed the law. My family followed the law.

I reject "sanctuary cities" with every bit of fervency. No municipality should have a right to ignore federal law.


2 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 23, 2017 at 6:43 pm

"Pretty easy to see which side is fear mongering.. SAD"

Just like the Tories discounted Paul Revere.


"@ Curmudgeon: Why should I be afraid of cities following the law? I am now a U.S. citizen. I followed the law. My family followed the law. "

Easy. No need to panic if you stay near a sanctuary city.

Aren't you wondering why Trump, Sessions, et al. are focusing so many government resources on this relatively unimportant matter? You should be. The conclusions ain't pretty.


3 people like this
Posted by resident
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Apr 23, 2017 at 6:52 pm

In case you have not noticed we are in a major drug epidemic - the newspapers have noticed this. Bernie Sanders talked about this during the campaign. So how are the drugs getting here? Who are the major transporters of the drugs? Where are the drugs made - many types now.
Why is SF spending so much money trying to clean up the drug problem from the back end - not the front end? You need to connect the dots here to see that across the US the drugs need to stop. So that is very important.


12 people like this
Posted by palo alto resident
a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Apr 23, 2017 at 7:08 pm

@resident - our major drug epidemic is prescription opiods - which ironically come from pharmacies, not foreign countries Web Link


5 people like this
Posted by Martha
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 23, 2017 at 8:39 pm

Dear Palo Alto resident,

Please note that both China and Mexico are very much part of the drug problem in USA. China is a lead supplier of ingredients used by drug addicts, see article below, and Mexican drug cartels trade in ALL types of drugs, including bootlegged and counterfeit pharmaceuticals. Also note that the latest offering will be legal canibis products that are laced with opioid ingredients, which is already happening.

Web Link


6 people like this
Posted by Nayeli
a resident of Midtown
on Apr 23, 2017 at 8:54 pm

@ palo alto resident - If our "major" drug epidemic is based upon prescription opioids, then why are there millions of dollars in drugs seized at checkpoints all over the southern border?

If you travel on roads near those southern borders (particularly at Presidio, Laredo or the Falfurrias, Sarita, Sierra Blanca and other Texas checkpoints), you'll find massive stacks of drugs and guns nearly every day.


2 people like this
Posted by Martha
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Apr 23, 2017 at 8:55 pm

[Post removed.]


4 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm

"In case you have not noticed we are in a major drug epidemic - the newspapers have noticed this."

@resident brings up a good point: The drug epidemic is yet another urgent national need that Trump slyly sidesteps while he noisily persecutes "illegal" immigrants who are causing no real harm.

I wonder how many of The Base for whom this show is being staged are slowly dying of addiction while vital resources are being diverted from their treatment programs to DHS and ICE.


2 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Apr 23, 2017 at 9:03 pm

"many legal immigrants come here fleeing societies ridden with corruption far worse than we suffer, and security threats. They come here for our rule of law."

Check out the news sometime. Lots of them have been rethinking that rule of law thing since Trump was elected, and many more since Trump began his reign of error.

It's good that you acknowledge corruption. Admitting the problem is the first step.


Like this comment
Posted by resident
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Apr 23, 2017 at 9:36 pm

[Post removed.]


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

A Hard Road
By Chandrama Anderson | 4 comments | 1,637 views

Babywearing
By Cheryl Bac | 0 comments | 480 views

 

Registration now open

Sign up for the 33rd annual Palo Alto Weekly Moonlight Run and Walk. This family-friendly event which benefits local nonprofits serving kids and families will take place on Friday, Oct. 6 at the Palo Alto Baylands.

Register Here