Sports

Quick heads Stanford honorees on All-Century team

 

Legendary coach Richard Quick was named the Pac-12 Women's Swimming and Diving Coach of the Century, and eight other former Stanford standouts were named to the on the Pac-12 All-Century Team announced by the conference on Monday night.

Joining Quick on the list of All-Century honorees were Jenny Thompson (freestyle sprints), Jenna Johnson (freestyle sprints), Janet Evans (freestyle distance), Lea Loveless-Mauer (backstroke), Tara Kirk (breaststroke), Misty Hyman (butterfly), Summer Sanders (individual medley and butterfly), and Eileen Richetelli (3-meter diving).

A panel of 25 coaches, swimmers, administrators and members of the media selected the team consisting of 26 swimmers, six divers and one coach.

The top four vote-earners in each of the six disciplines made the All-Century Team, with two additional "wild-card" swimmers selected by a second vote of the remaining fifth-, sixth- and seventh-place finishers. The top two divers in each of the three events also made the All-Century Team. Swimmers and divers could be nominated in more than one event, with three earning roster spots in multiple events.

Quick coached at Stanford for 17 seasons and captured 12 NCAA Division I Women's Swimming and Diving team titles during his collegiate coaching career, the most by any coach in the history of the sport. He was a member of the U.S. Olympic Swimming Team coaching staff six times with three assignments as the head coach for the women's squad (1988, 1996, 2000). He was the 2000 United States Olympic Committee Coach of the Year.

Quick claimed seven of his NCAA titles at Stanford, guiding his first Cardinal team to a national championship in 1989 before winning five in a row from 1992-96 and one more in 1998. He coached Stanford to 14 Pac-10 crowns, including back-to-back league titles in each of his last two seasons. He started his Stanford career by winning his first 57 dual meets, while his teams on The Farm sported an all-time record of 123-10 (.925) .

Quick coached 41 NCAA champions who captured a combined 63 national individual titles and 29 NCAA relay crowns during his 17 seasons at Stanford. He was a five-time NCAA Coach of the Year (1984, 1985, 1986, 1989, 1992) and a four-time Pac-10 Coach of the Year (1989, 1992, 1995, 2001).

Jenna Johnson was a 14-time All-American and the 1986 Collegiate Sports Award Winner. She was inducted into Stanford Hall of Fame (2003) after winning NCAA titles in the 50 free (1986-87), 100 free (1986-87), 100 fly (1986, 1989), 200 free relay (1986), 400 free relay (1987), 200 medley relay (1986) and 400 medley relay (1987). Johnson also was a 1984 Olympian and won a gold medal on the 400 medley relay team and a silver in the 100 fly and on the 400 free relay.

Jenny Thompson was a 26-time All-American and the 1995 Collegiate Sports Award Winner. She was inducted into Stanford Hall of Fame in 2007. She won NCAA titles in the 50 free (1992-93), 100 free (1992-95), 100 fly (1994-95), 200 IM (1995), 200 free relay (1993-94), 400 free relay (1992, 1994-95), 800 free relay (1992-93), and 200 medley relay (1992-93, 1995).

Thompson was a four-time Olympian (1992, 1996, 2000, 2004) and won gold medals in the 400 free relay (1992, 1996, 2000), 400 medley relay (1992, 1996, 2000, 2004), and 800 free relay (1992, 2000), silver medals in the 400 free relay (2004) and 100 free plus a bronze medal in the 100 free (2000).

Janet Evans was an eight-time All-American, the 1990 NCAA Swimmer of the Year and the 1990 Collegiate Sports Award Winner who stayed on The Farm for two seasons before turning pro. She's the school recordholder in 500 free (4:34.49) and 1,650 free (15:39.14), won numerous conference titles and won NCAA titles in the 500 free (1990-91), 1,650 free (1990-91), 400 IM (1990) and 800 free relay (1990-91). Evans also was a three-time Olympian (1988, 1992, 1996) and won gold medals in the 800 free (1988, 1992), 400 free (1988), 400 IM (1988) and won a silver in the 400 free in 1992.

Lea Loveless Mauer was a 19-time All-American and was inducted into Stanford Hall of Fame in 2006. She won numerous Pac-12 individual and relay titles in addition to winning NCAA titles in the 100 back (1992-94), 200 back (1993), 200 free relay (1993), 800 free relay (1992), 200 medley relay (1992-93) and 400 medley relay (1992-93). She was a 1992 Olympian, winning a gold medal on the 400 medley relay and a silver in the 100 back. She later returned to school and coached the Cardinal women's swim team.

Tara Kirk was a 16-time All-American, the 2004 NCAA Swimmer of the Year, the 2004 Honda Award Winner and the 2004 Collegiate Sports Award Winner. Kirk was inducted into Stanford Hall of Fame in 2015. She won numerous Pac-12 titles in addition to winning NCAA crowns in 100 breast (2001-04), 200 breast (2002-04), 200 medley relay (2001-02) and 400 medley relay (2001-02). She was a 2004 Olympian, earning a silver medal on the 400 medley relay.

Misty Hyman was a 28-time All-American, the 1998 NCAA Swimmer of the Year, the Collegiate Sports Award Winner (1998 and 2001) and was inducted into Stanford Hall of Fame in 2012). In addition to winning a handful of conference titles, Hyman was a national champ in the 200 back (1998), 100 fly (1998-99), 200 fly (1998, 2001), 800 free relay (1999), 200 medley relay (1998-99, 2001) and 400 medley relay (1998-99, 2001). Hyman was a 2000 Olympian and won the 200 fly gold medal.

Summer Sanders was a 12-time All-American, was the 1991 and 1992 NCAA Swimmer of the Year and the 1992 Collegiate Sports Award Winner. Sanders was inducted into Stanford Hall of Fame in 2001 despite staying just two years on The Farm before turning pro. In addition to conference titles, Sanders won NCAA crowns in the 200 fly (1991-92), 200 IM (1991-92), 400 IM (1991-92), 400 free relay (1992), 200 medley relay (1992-93), and 400 medley relay. Sanders was a 1992 Olympian and won a gold medal in the 200 fly and on the 400 medley relay. She also earned silver in the 200 IM and a bronze in the 400 IM.

Eileen Richetelli was an 11-time All-American and was the NCAA Diver of the Year in 1992 and 1993. She was a five-time NCAA champion (3-meter diving in 1992, 1993 and platform diving in 1992, 1993, 1995).

— Stanford Athletics/Palo Alto Online Sports

Comments

2 people like this
Posted by Nick
a resident of Stanford
on Feb 16, 2016 at 10:27 pm

I think Julia Smit should have been on this list as well.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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