News

Rain expected in Bay Area for several straight days starting Friday

 

Wet weather is coming to the Bay Area starting Friday and it should last through much of next week, a National Weather Service forecaster said.

The rain will start at about noon Friday and continue into Saturday, with heavy rain at times across the Bay Area through next Wednesday, forecaster Steve Anderson said.

The surf and winds will not be as high as during a storm that hit the region this past Sunday, Anderson said.

"It's mostly going to be a rain event," Anderson said.

Weather service officials expect two to four inches of rain in the North Bay, one to two inches in San Francisco and about an inch in both the East and South Bays, according to Anderson.

The above normal rainfall will be near the Oregon border, where 10to 12 inches is expected, he said.

He said the storm is not going to be an El Nino event but rather another winter storm.

In the Bay Area, rain is forecast to fall at least once in each 24-hour period, Anderson said.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials are predicting extreme high tides, called King tides, in Marin County from Monday through Wednesday before Christmas.

High tides, but not King tides, are forecast for Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and the day after Christmas, NOAA officials said.

Marin County sheriff's officials said the high tides and King tides will likely flood roads, and the flooding could mean those traveling have to take a different route.

Caltrans told sheriff's officials that the potential for flooding will last until Dec. 28.

Sheriff's officials are reminding drivers to avoid driving through pounded water and to allow extra time for travel during peak commuter times and on holiday travel days.

Comments

4 people like this
Posted by Barron Park dad
a resident of Barron Park
on Dec 17, 2015 at 10:29 am

Boy, this sentence caught my eye. What does an El Nino storm feel like then?

"He said the storm is not going to be an El Nino event but rather another winter storm."


2 people like this
Posted by Parent
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Dec 17, 2015 at 11:02 am

Good, the kids will be at school taking their last final exams before the rain hits hard.


17 people like this
Posted by enough!
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Dec 17, 2015 at 11:34 am

I'll believe it when I see it. Palo Alto is a victim of geography, more accurately, mountain shadowing. We get less rain than most.


24 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Dec 17, 2015 at 12:22 pm

"What does an El Nino storm feel like then?"

Relatively warm and muggy. They come from the tropics.


26 people like this
Posted by El nino and flood survivor
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Dec 17, 2015 at 1:20 pm

El nino is buckets and buckets of pouring rain for days and weeks on end, with resulting flooding. Ugly.


26 people like this
Posted by Jeff
a resident of College Terrace
on Dec 17, 2015 at 2:44 pm

I remember the last major El Nino flood in Palo Alto in 1998. There was a fairly long period of light to moderate rain, and it saturated the ground. THEN the buckets of rain came down on 1-2 days, during a high tide. The Chaucer bridge acted as a dam, and San Francisquito creek broke out into the neighborhoods and downstream. Pretty simple stuff. Ugly, too.


17 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Dec 17, 2015 at 11:03 pm

"Palo Alto is a victim of geography, more accurately, mountain shadowing. We get less rain than most."

FWIW: The vast majority of our storms blow in from a sector extending from the southwest to the west-northwest, and therefore drop most of their moisture in the mountains. The 1998 storm was unusual. It was much more intense than normal, and it came in from the north parallel to the mountains.


34 people like this
Posted by Swept Away
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Dec 17, 2015 at 11:18 pm

[Post removed due to numerous misstatements of fact.]


3 people like this
Posted by Curmudgeon
a resident of Downtown North
on Dec 17, 2015 at 11:41 pm

[Post removed.]


4 people like this
Posted by Mike
a resident of University South
on Dec 18, 2015 at 7:18 am

Bad timing. Why can't it rain when the kids are in school and be clear when they're on vacation? Who do I talk to about this? ;-)


17 people like this
Posted by Swept Away
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Dec 18, 2015 at 9:34 am

Curmudgeon: I worked outdoors from 1990-2011, and as a result I was very aware of weather. In December of 1997, I started keeping track of rainy days because it was a.ready apparent this was no ordinary El Niño.

We also helped people sandbag their homes all over town, and because I had a 4WD truck for hauling horse trailers, my son, in high school at the time, made many, MANY runs with friends to pick up sandbags from Santa Clara after Palo Alto ran out. Many nights in Feb 1998, they were up past midnight helping retired, sick, or disabled Palo Altans, sandbag their homes. Many friends in Crescent Park, Green Gables, and other locations were flooded out. The sound wall along 101 held the water in and kept it from draining away.

I also had the displeasure of watching horses suffer whose feet ( and skin of their legs) literally rotted away. There were not enough spaces in the barns at that time. The Stanford Equestrian Team lost a horse, even. Most of the horses used for riding lessons had "mud fever", a fungus that becomes severely infected. [Portion removed.] I was a hard-working horse trainer and riding instructor. Most of us in the horse industry did not bring in much income between December 1997 and April 1998.

You may have lived locally at the time, but you were most certainly NOT out in the weather from dawn to long after dusk day after day after day!


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