A&E


A&E Digest: New public art approved, Redwood City gets spruced up

This week's A&E news

Palo Alto's Public Art Commission approves new art installations for City Hall's King Plaza, Mountain View's Community School of Music and Arts receives a major grant, Redwood City beautifies its downtown area and more.

NEW PUBLIC ART FOR PALO ALTO ... Palo Altos' Public Art Commission on July 23 approved a series of public art installations to be placed in King Plaza, in front of City Hall, over the course of 2016. Among them are Bruce Beasley's "Rondo," a sculpture composed of interlocking metal rings, and "Chime," a work by San Francisco-based artists Dan Gottwald and Scott Watkins that invites passersby to interact with it, pushing on wooden panels to create gentle music. In total, $16,500 was earmarked for these projects. Commissioners also approved a piece of public art that will appear in various locations throughout the city. The Mobile Arts Platform consists of two battery-powered bicycles towing trailers that connect to form a kiosk where passersby can stop to make art and generate ideas. The project is intended to draw attention from city residents who might not attend Art Commission meetings but who would be willing to share their ideas in a more informal setting. In total, $10,000 has been set aside for artist-led community engagement toward the creation of Public Art Master Plan for Palo Alto.

CSMA RECEIVES MAJOR GRANT ... Mountain View's Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA) has been designated as a recipient of a $10,200 award from the California Arts Council, it announced July 20. The grant is part of the Arts Council's Artists in Schools program, and will go to support Art4Schools, CSMA's visual arts education program offered to K-12 students in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. Art4Schools currently serves approximately 16,000 students each year. To learn more about Art4Schools, go to arts4all.org. For a full list of Artists in Schools grantees, go to arts.ca.gov/news/pressreleases.php.

MOUNTAIN VIEW DANCER SOARS ... Mountain View native and winner of the first season of FOX network's popular reality dance competition, "So You Think You Can Dance," Nick Lazzarini returns to the South Bay with a new production. "Shaping Sound" will perform at Cupertino's Flint Center for the Performing Arts on Oct. 25, at 3 p.m. The show draws together artists who describe themselves as "visual musicians" -- contemporary dancers whose work gives shape to sound. To learn more about the production, go to shapingsoundco.com. Tickets are available at ticketmaster.com.

REDWOOD CITY GETS SPRUCED UP ... Redwood City has embarked on a beautification project. Spearheaded by the Redwood City Improvement Association, the project aims to revive the scenic downtown area and make the region a more desirable destination for people of all ages. Among the enhancements of the city center is a 3-D video light show that projects onto the San Mateo County History Museum every Tuesday night at 8 and 9 p.m. Other projects include power washing, street cleaning and expanded valet parking.

Comments

7 people like this
Posted by Michael Dawson
a resident of another community
on Jul 27, 2015 at 5:05 pm

Redwood City must be the area's most under-rated gem. We've always been a big fan of downtown, and with everything the city has done to attract world-class restaurants and entertainment, it makes me glad to own real estate nearby. Keep up the great work, RWC!


5 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 27, 2015 at 5:24 pm

Redwood City is doing what Palo Alto should be doing.

I enjoy all my visits, personal visits, recreation and meetings. Parking at meters for loose change makes parking easy. The signage and downtown areas are easy to navigate. They appear to be very family friendly with parades and fairs, they have a good mix of shopping, a good mix of restaurants and a good mix of entertainment.

The building frenzy that is going on there as everywhere else, seems not to be causing the problems that exist elsewhere on the Peninsula - at least to me as an outsider.

We could learn a lot from RWC.


10 people like this
Posted by Online Name
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jul 27, 2015 at 7:18 pm

I want to know how much the other part of the project will cost Palo Alto. It sounds like there are both construction AND staffing costs.

"Commissioners also approved a piece of public art that will appear in various locations throughout the city. The "Mobile Arts Platform" consists of two battery-powered bicycles towing trailers that connect to form a kiosk where passersby can stop to make art and generate ideas."


Like this comment
Posted by Elizabeth Schwyzer
arts & entertainment editor of the Palo Alto Weekly
on Jul 28, 2015 at 12:14 pm

Elizabeth Schwyzer is a registered user.

Thanks for your question, Online Name. The Mobile Arts Platform is part of the larger effort to create Palo Alto's first Public Art Master Plan. I've added a few details to this A&E Digest. For more details, you may want to read the city staff report here:

Web Link

There's also a brief mention of the Master Plan process in last week's A&E Digest, which you can read here:

Web Link


6 people like this
Posted by Online Name
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jul 28, 2015 at 5:33 pm

Thanks for the link to the 25-page report containing lots of resume's showing people with experience in Las Vegas and other places.

I skimmed it and didn't see an answer to my question about how much the
Mobile Arts Platform" will cost or whether staff will be required to move the bikes around. Are the bikes self-driving as well as battery-operated?

I ask because I looked at the link in the original article re the arts platform took me to an extravaganza project in San Francisco.

Or maybe the Mobile Arts Platform is part of our "Wayfaring" system and/or our "Happiness Mapping" Project.

Please clarify. Thanks in advance.


6 people like this
Posted by Online Name
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jul 28, 2015 at 5:37 pm

Also, do the bikes and trailers towing the kiosk move down the sidewalks or down the street?

Which streets and at what time of day?

Either way, what's their traffic impact when/if passersby decide to "generate ideas" at the kiosk?


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

Salt & Straw Palo Alto to open Nov. 23
By Elena Kadvany | 0 comments | 3,493 views

Trials of My Grandmother
By Aldis Petriceks | 2 comments | 1,457 views

Lakes and Larders (part 2)
By Laura Stec | 0 comments | 1,217 views

Can we ever improve our schools?
By Diana Diamond | 6 comments | 696 views