News

Stanford professor wins $500K Gruber Neuroscience Prize

Carla Shatz's work has aided understanding of disorders such as autism, Alzheimer's

Stanford University biology and neurobiology professor Carla Shatz was awarded Tuesday Yale University's 2015 Gruber Foundation Neuroscience Prize for her work, which has contributed to the understanding of such disorders as autism, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's.

Shatz, who will share the $500,000 prize for the award with Harvard University neurobiology professor Michael Greenberg, was honored for advancing understanding of how neural-circuit function and brain signaling controls wiring, plasticity and development in the brain and how dysfunction can lead to certain disorders, according to the Gruber Foundation.

Officials with the foundation said Shatz's research significantly helps scientists' understanding of neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, and could eventually lead to finding better treatments.

Her study maps how the brain merges two separate visual signals from each eye to form a single image and which brain connections are strengthened or pruned back during and after early development.

The research found that some proteins associated with the immune system play an integral role in this process, highlighting an unprecedented connection between the nervous system and the immune proteins.

Schatz is currently the inaugural chair holder for the Sapp Family Provostial Professorship in Stanford's Department of Neurobiology and the David Starr Jordan director of Stanford Bio-X, Stanford's biomedical and bioscience department.

Comments

4 people like this
Posted by Greenacres
a resident of Green Acres
on Jun 2, 2015 at 5:27 pm

Very cool. Thank you for the summary of her work. Congratulations, professor!!


Like this comment
Posted by Palo Alto Resident
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jun 2, 2015 at 5:44 pm

Awesome!!!!


1 person likes this
Posted by Me
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jun 2, 2015 at 6:47 pm

Make me proud.....


Like this comment
Posted by CrescentParkAnon.
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2015 at 2:25 pm

>> Her study maps how the brain merges two separate
>> visual signals from each eye to form a single image
>> and which brain connections are strengthened or
>> pruned back during and after early development.

>> The research found that some proteins associated
>> with the immune system play an integral role in this
>> process, highlighting an unprecedented connection
>> between the nervous system and the immune proteins.

Fascinating ... can anyone put a link or reference to where
the public might find out more about this research? I'd
love to read more about this.


Like this comment
Posted by Sarah1000
a resident of Los Altos
on Jun 8, 2015 at 3:12 pm

Congratulations! Professor Shatz, would you please support Joe Simitian's efforts in improving child/adolescent mental health care in Santa Clara County so our youth can benefit from your research? Thank you.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

He said – she said – who is lying? Justice Brett Kavanaugh or PA resident Christine Ford
By Diana Diamond | 35 comments | 1,326 views

Global Warming Diet
By Laura Stec | 5 comments | 1,199 views

Couples: "Taming Your Gremlin" by Richard Carson
By Chandrama Anderson | 0 comments | 1,047 views

Preparing for kindergarten
By Cheryl Bac | 0 comments | 574 views

 

Pre-registration ends tomorrow!

​On Friday, September 21, join us at the Palo Alto Baylands for a 5K walk, 5K run, 10K run, or—for the first time—half marathon! All proceeds benefit local nonprofits serving children and families.

Learn More