News

Private, alternative K-8 school opening in Palo Alto this fall

AltSchool draws on technology, flexibility and personalization

AltSchool, a new private K-8 school set to launch this fall in downtown Palo Alto, prides itself on actively operating on the opposite end of the spectrum from traditional modes of learning.

As explained by AltSchool founder and former Google executive Max Ventilla to a crowd of about 50 parents at an information session at Cubberley Community Center Monday evening, each AltSchool student learns via a "playlist," or a personalized-learning plan that can be adapted or altered whenever a student has the need. AltSchool classrooms are small, mixed-grade and flexible, so students move on to the higher grade whenever it makes sense for them, whether that's in December or March. An AltSchool day is based on around students following their personalized "playlist," which could involve small group work, reading, a field trip or working on a long-term project in the morning and afternoon. Bookending each day are extracurriculars like foreign language, yoga, coding, guitar or robotics.

Work is done in class, and homework is what's left over, or assignments specifically designed to be done at home. There's a strong emphasis on real-world learning, with content drawing on the Common Core State Standards, Next Generation Science Standards and state standards for social-emotional learning.

The overarching vision of AltSchool is to leverage the transformational power of technology to redefine children's educational experiences, explained Ventilla, who's armed with years of high-level technology and personalization work experience.

Ventilla worked at Google on and off for a decade, first in business operations and strategy and later as a founding member of the company' social network, Google+, and head of personalization. In between those positions, he co-founded Aardvark, a social search engine that Google eventually bought in 2010.

He left Google in 2013 to found the first AltSchool in San Francisco after being discouraged by the elementary school options for his two young children — "disturbed" that they didn't offered the level of agency or innovation that he hoped 21st century schools would.

"We, technologists within the company, have spent our adult lives building things that get better and better the more people use them," he said. "And here you have this thing that is so essential, not just to our families but to society — namely, elementary education and middle school education — and we have this 19th-century dynamic where it's constrained. The more kids go, the worse the experience gets.

"We said, 'We need to operate with very different priorities,'" he said of the AltSchool founders. "It needs to be different, the central pillars that we build our school upon, than what we've seen dictate how schools operate."

One of those pillars is being small in the ways a school should be small and being big in the ways a school should be big, Ventilla said. AltSchool is small in that it adapts to each student on a by-need basis, and large in that each school is part of a growing network of "micro-schools" whose resources any student or family can — and is encouraged to — take advantage of. This might be a teacher whose specialty is in a particular extracurricular subject or the support staff AltSchool offers (20 engineers and counting, plus numerous administrative roles), Ventilla said. Thinking big also touches on a concept more familiar in the world of technology than education: The more people who use a service or product, the more it will improve.

"I would guess that the vast majority of people in this room would rather have a social network or search engine or smartphone that more people got to experience, rather than fewer."

The AltSchool network began with just 10 students and one location in San Francisco. It's expanded to four San Francisco micro-schools that serve more than 150 students. Ventilla said they'll soon double the number of schools in San Francisco, with at least one more on its way this fall. New schools in Brookyln and Palo Alto will also come online this fall.

The schools function as cohesive, interchangeable outposts that any AltSchool student can attend at any time. If a Palo Alto family wants or needs to spend time with relatives in New York, their child could enroll in the Brooklyn school without skipping a beat, in theory. (Ventilla admitted this is slightly self-serving and frees up parents and families from staying in one place for more than a decade as their children go through elementary and middle school.)

"For us, it's about balance," Ventilla said. "It's about creating that intimate, personalized, customizable environment that can actually change in major ways throughout the time that you spend at AltSchool. This idea that you should be choosing for your 4-year-olds what experience that they're going to have at age 12 and 13 doesn't make any sense to us. Even if you could predict it, it's not clear that a child is going to be best served as their age triples by the same school experience in terms of what type of peers they have or what type of academic focus or what type of schedule of the day they experience.

"This idea (is) that we're actually creating a network of all of the resources you want in a larger school" — such as shared technology, specialized knowledge, established best practices — "and more, without losing the things that draw you to small schools."

Alice Shikina, AltSchool's community manager, told the crowd of parents Monday night that AltSchool changed the path of her two children significantly, and in very different ways. The school's flexibility allowed one of her sons, an advanced reader, to move at a faster pace in his blended classroom. (AltSchool's three "programs" are lower elementary, which is transitional kindergarten/kindergarten and kindergarten/first grade; upper elementary, which is second/third and fourth/fifth grade; and middle school, which is sixth, seventh and eighth grade.)

Shikina's other son has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and had been getting in trouble often in school, leaving his academics and self-esteem damaged. She said AltSchool helped him grow in the much-needed area of social-emotional development, which he wouldn't have experienced at his traditional school.

One parent Monday evening asked, "What type of student wouldn't do well at AltSchool?" Ventilla said that there is no single type, but students — and parents — who benefit from more regularity, structure and predictability might not adjust as well.

The Palo Alto location will be at 930 Emerson St., which formerly housed a car repair shop and has room to accommodate 80 students, though Ventilla stressed Monday that the AltSchool admissions process is not designed to be exclusive or competitive. The 5,000 square-foot space will be divided into three or four flexible classrooms, with a small area outside for students to play.

"We are accepting the vast majority of the people that apply to AltSchool," he said.

Some students might not be placed at their ideal school location, or might be waitlisted until more room opens up — which could be at any point during the year, as AltSchool has year-round rolling admissions. Ventilla said his team, which is also rapidly growing, plans to meet whatever demand comes down the pipeline and is already looking at opening more locations in the South Bay.

AltSchool is privately funded, raking in $33 million in venture capital this spring from big-name firms like Andresseen Horowitz and Founders Fund.

"That's something that's very, very different about AltSchool. We're not capacity-constrained and we're creating a network where things get better as more people participate," Ventilla said.

Applications for Palo Alto are due Jan. 15, though Ventilla, who described going through an intensely competitive admissions process to get his daughter into preschool, stressed that it is simply an information-gathering exercise that shouldn't take more than 30 minutes to an hour. (Parents can even send in applications they have already filled out for other schools, he said.) AltSchool's base tuition, which covers 10 months and not an opt-in summer session in Palo Alto, is $26,250 for elementary school and $27,000 for middle school. Need-based tuition assistance is available.

The most critical segments of the admissions process for AltSchool are parent interviews and school visits, explained AltSchool Director of Education Carolyn Wilson, who founded Chrysalis School in Menlo Park and worked on a school-reform project at Stanford University. The AltSchool team will begin to shape the Palo Alto classrooms based on these interviews and on the demographics and qualities of children who apply.

"We can stand on the shoulders of everyone that's come before us," Ventilla said. "Starting with first principles doesn't mean abandoning all the great things that other people have figured out and are doing. It means taking advantage of them."

Comments

4 people like this
Posted by Parent
a resident of JLS Middle School
on Jan 7, 2015 at 4:32 pm

Please extend through 12th grade!


2 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jan 7, 2015 at 4:46 pm

Interesting.

Haven't actually digested the information about the school so won't comment on that.

But, is this location a good idea? Presumably all these students are going to be driven to school. Is there anywhere parents can park for 15 minutes while taking the kids to the classroom or will they have to be dropped off and picked up at the curb and is there space for this? What about parking for the teachers? Is there any parking spaces attached to this building?



5 people like this
Posted by anonymous
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jan 7, 2015 at 4:56 pm

Innovation in education is a good idea, and I welcome thoughtful ideas about that...
but by 8th grade a student should be able to handle some structure in order to fit into society, the work world. It's a bit much for all aspects to cater to a young individual's whims. Example: sometimes we don't know what's good for us: taking multiple years of a foreign language or studying and persevering at music. Students should have some flexibility in personal time, EC's, but a certain amount of structure, say learning about geography, that has been thrown by the wayside in favor of video gaming, is detrimental IMO.


11 people like this
Posted by mattie
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jan 7, 2015 at 5:20 pm

Our experience with Palo Alto schools has been absolutely fabulous so far. And $28,000 less expensive, unless you factor in how much we all pay to live here! :)

I would defy any professional educator to spend a week at Addison and then tell us these kids aren't being prepared for whatever crazy future this world decides to throw at them. I hear things get crazy come ~7th grade. We'll see.

Choice is indeed good, however... so long as they don't pull a Castilleja and think they're above following local rules on parking, etc.


6 people like this
Posted by Hmm
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jan 7, 2015 at 6:44 pm

Where is everyone supposed to park? Will there be a valet service?


8 people like this
Posted by Todd
a resident of El Carmelo School
on Jan 7, 2015 at 6:59 pm

[Post removed.]


4 people like this
Posted by Mr.Recycle
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jan 7, 2015 at 9:59 pm

[Post removed.]


4 people like this
Posted by anon
a resident of Evergreen Park
on Jan 7, 2015 at 11:23 pm

thought this former retail site was being redeveloped for office.

What are the implications on parking/traffic by changing to school ?

Would the project as is, been approved for a school?

What will the impact be on the other small existing businesses nearby; hair salons, dry cleaners, personal services, etc….


5 people like this
Posted by Palo Alto DRY AF
a resident of Woodland Ave. area (East Palo Alto)
on Jan 8, 2015 at 9:12 am

Not to be rude, but the writing of this article is horrendous. Please go back to college for your and the readers' sakes. For example, the sentence "He left Google in 2013 to found the first AltSchool", uses the incorrect tense of the word found. Thank you and best regards.


2 people like this
Posted by Olenka Villarreal
a resident of Community Center
on Jan 8, 2015 at 10:38 am

What a wonderful and innovative idea! I am thankful that Max developed this new model to provide families with choices. Not all kids learn the same way and having a terrific public system and now another alternative school available to us is as good as it gets! Thank you Max and team and good luck to you all.


1 person likes this
Posted by me
a resident of Charleston Meadows
on Jan 8, 2015 at 10:51 am

We all learn differently, we all grow up differently and we all work in different fields...so why not have a school that allows people to learn they way it works for them?

I think it's a great idea - have been sending letters to Sacramento for years asking for something like this. Kudos to you and I wish my kids were young enough to have had this opportunity.


5 people like this
Posted by VC funded for profit
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 8, 2015 at 10:57 am

Doesn't mean it won't be good. But it is a for profit corporation. Most private schools are nonprofit, which requires a degree of transparency that this operation does not have. It is ultimately responsible to investors and shareholders. Where those interests are aligned with parents and students, great. Where they are not, the corp has a fiduciary duty to privilege the interests of its investors and shareholders first.


2 people like this
Posted by VC funded for profit
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 8, 2015 at 10:58 am

I think that this fact of corporate structure, so different from what people are used do, should have been mentioned in the story and what the implications of a corporate for-profit school might be. Thanks for following that up.


15 people like this
Posted by Ame
a resident of Menlo Park
on Jan 8, 2015 at 11:06 am

"Found " is the correct tense


Like this comment
Posted by Correction
a resident of Jordan Middle School
on Jan 8, 2015 at 12:04 pm


VC funded notes:


"It is ultimately responsible to investors and shareholders. Where those interests are aligned with parents and students, great. Where they are not..."


Umm, one correction:


It is ultimately responsible to investors and shareholders. Where those interests are aligned with [CUSTOMERS], great. Where they are not


... Companies who ignore their customers don't last long. Investors know this, and will pressure management and employees to improve. They know their investment is at stake.

It's why companies respond to yelp complaints. Customers matter. A LOT.


4 people like this
Posted by Bob
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jan 8, 2015 at 12:23 pm

Not certain that downtown is a good place for a school, even a small one. Doubtless this activity will take the property off of the property tax rolls, for an activity that is not really needed in Palo Alto. Given that this is a private enterprise, then it’s totally possible that not one Palo Alto resident will be enrolled. Nonetheless, the public will have to provide free police and fire services to this school, and who knows how many other public costs will be absorbed by this company.

And there is the other little problem of how to repay the $33M in seed capital. Most VC assume that there will be losses during the startup years, but that they will “cash out” when the companies in which they invest go public, or at least they can recover something by selling the assets of the company when they decide to shut it down. Schools can be operated for a profit, but given the high costs of everything these days—it’s difficult to believe that any school will see $33M in profits in 3-4 years. So, there is every chance that this enterprise will not ever repay the VCs. So, what does that mean, in terms of the education delivered to the customers?

Maybe this enterprise is fulfilling to its founders—but it doesn’t seem like anything that will benefit the public at large, any time soon.


1 person likes this
Posted by Hmm
a resident of Palo Alto Hills
on Jan 8, 2015 at 12:46 pm

Doesn't look like any building permits have been filed for interior remodel of old auto shop or for Use and Occupancy permit, but Private Education is a permitted use at this address (RT-35 district). 2 Spaces per "teaching station" are required so looks like plenty of room if only 3-4 "rooms."


5 people like this
Posted by MoreTraffic
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jan 8, 2015 at 1:52 pm

Take a look at the cars backed up at the school near the Post Office and the school on the east side of San Antonio between Middlefield and Alma. Parents deliver and pick up their children, blocking East Bayshore and San Antonio because there is no off-street waiting area. Imagine what is going to happen near 930 Emerson St!


7 people like this
Posted by Sarah
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jan 8, 2015 at 2:20 pm

I welcome new ideas. However, my kid needs a big playground or field to run around during recess and lunch time.


Like this comment
Posted by Arthur Keller
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Jan 8, 2015 at 4:13 pm

I've recommended that Palo Alto require a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) for private schools so that the parking and transportation issues can be addressed, and to ensure their siting is appropriate. I still think this should be considered. After all, Castilleja has a CUP. So why shouldn't all private schools require a CUP? (Public schools have their own government, and there is a City-School Liaison Committee to coordinate among them.)


8 people like this
Posted by Mom
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jan 8, 2015 at 4:38 pm

The difficult location appears to be much like the school's philosophy of learning to be selfish through working individually without structure or care for how they affect others. Can the students dictate their own hours too? This isn't good preparation for life. The lack of playground is an issue too. Attending school is more than just learning academics.


7 people like this
Posted by Julie
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jan 8, 2015 at 4:49 pm

The only thing missing here seems to be any background and experience in educating children. Maybe if even more tech buzz words and phrases are used, we will be so dazzled that we will forget to apply the critical thinking we learned from teachers who were actually educators?


1 person likes this
Posted by Pop
a resident of Midtown
on Jan 8, 2015 at 7:31 pm

Emerson and Heads up school are in a re use Palo Alto Building in Palo Alto their approval for parking and use was easy and simple why not the same requirements in this case?

I am certain Parents will find a safe way to drop off their children, This school will be a great addition!


2 people like this
Posted by PAlo alto
a resident of Downtown North
on Jan 8, 2015 at 7:51 pm

There was such a negative stigma attached to going to private school when I grew up in Palo Alto. Even now, when people in Palo Alto speak about private schools, I always think that the child somehow did something wrong. I know that things have changed, but I just can't shake the image.


7 people like this
Posted by Parent
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jan 9, 2015 at 12:10 am

"This isn't good preparation for life."

Teaching kids that learning is fun is good preparation for life. Teaching them that they can be independent and complete complex tasks that they set for themselves is good preparation for life.

Hazing them through homework is not good preparation for life. Teaching them they should work all day and all night and not learn how to separate work and home is not good preparation for life. Giving them no social time is not good preparation for life. (The data from the Development Assets survey on what a large percentage of our kids never spend time with friends or on outside activities during the week even as they spend all their time on homework is criminal.)

Recognizing that we're not educating 19th century factory workers or 20th century corporate drones probably counts for something, too. Necessity is the mother of invention. You don't get invention from people who don't think they need to change in a changing world and don't think they need to listen to those they serve.

Find a way to work out a hybrid instructional model with PAUSD for high school, please!


4 people like this
Posted by K
a resident of University South
on Jan 9, 2015 at 12:19 am

I'm so glad I got to go to a good old fashioned public school in a very nice rural blue-collar town. Wouldn't trade it for anything. Didn't have to bother with social networks, smartphones and search engines. We had a set of encyclopedias, real friends and a regular old phone. We learned the basics and how to sew, cook and grow a vegetable garden, ride a horse, swim in a lake, play a good game of baseball. When I retire, I'm going right back. Counting the days!


9 people like this
Posted by TC
a resident of Menlo Park
on Jan 9, 2015 at 9:41 am

I'd be interested in looking into this school. Addison, where some of my children go, is as Mattie says above, great, but the gloves come off in middle school. My child in 7th has a volume of homework nothing short of astonishing. There are sometimes tears and very late nights. She holds her own (honor role, advanced math) but she is starting to HATE school, the pressure, the workload. And I sometimes question the value of some of the homework - some feels like busy work and knowledge retention is not great because of it. And really, will she keep doing well if she starts to mentally check out? Probably not. She's 12 and we've got plenty of this ahead of us at Paly. Not much time for social stuff, it's pretty sad. There really has to be a better way.


1 person likes this
Posted by Bob
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jan 9, 2015 at 12:52 pm

@TC (a resident of Menlo Park) writes--

> I'd be interested in looking into this school. Addison,
> where some of my children go

So .. just how does someone from Menlo Park get their children enrolled in the PAUSD?

Is this another case of enrollment fraud?


1 person likes this
Posted by Relax
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jan 9, 2015 at 1:03 pm

Bob,

Relax. If the person works for PAUSD, his or her kids can choose to study in Palo Alto public schools even they don't live in Palo Alto.


Like this comment
Posted by Bob
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jan 9, 2015 at 1:26 pm

> If the person works for PAUSD, his or her kids can choose to study in
> Palo Alto public schools even they don't live in Palo Alto.

Maybe .. and then again there have been very clear examples of enrollment fraud over the years that have been ignored by the PAUSD Board of Trustees.

Is there anything in @TC's post that proves she is a bona fide employee of the PAUSD?

As to the Allen Act, which actually allows ALL of the children of everyone working in Palo Alto to go to school here--the PAUSD Board has pretty much capped Allen Act transfers at zero--which is the only thing that they can do. The Allen Act is so misguided in the case of Basic Aid School Districts like the PAUSD, that it should be repealed.

Relax? With the abuse of public funds so rampant at every level of government, relaxing is the last thing that rational people should be doing!


3 people like this
Posted by J
a resident of Menlo Park
on Jan 9, 2015 at 1:40 pm

Bob, people also get divorced.


3 people like this
Posted by TC
a resident of Menlo Park
on Jan 9, 2015 at 3:09 pm

Hi
To Bob, I am divorced and their father lives in Palo Alto. Shared custody children (they live in Palo Alto 50% of school days) are permitted to go to either district. Hope that helps.
Tara


3 people like this
Posted by Correction
a resident of Jordan Middle School
on Jan 9, 2015 at 3:28 pm

Writes:

" My child in 7th has a volume of homework nothing short of astonishing. There are sometimes tears and very late nights. ... she is starting to HATE school, the pressure, the workload. And I sometimes question the value of some of the homework - some feels like busy work and knowledge retention is not great because of it. And really, will she keep doing well if she starts to mentally check out? Probably not. She's 12 and we've got plenty of this ahead of us at Paly. "


Had the same situation at Jordan, and I can still recall the comments from their teachers: " It'll only get worse next year"
- from Chris Grierson, now Principal at Duveneck


Very discouraging. Hope this private school offers better choices.


1 person likes this
Posted by Parent
a resident of JLS Middle School
on Jan 9, 2015 at 5:19 pm

Have the same situation at JLS. (If you haven't seen the recent thread on setting better school/home boundaries and the legality of homework, it's worth reading - Web Link )

I think there is a desire to innovate within PAUSD, among parents, administrators, and at the school level.

I'd love something like this!


2 people like this
Posted by T
a resident of Jordan Middle School
on Jan 10, 2015 at 8:01 am

The effect of homework varies . Maybe there is too much but maybe there needs to be more efficient time management and less distraction and a less comicated approach to life.
My 7th grader at Jordan is not up late doing homework, there are no tears - the work gets done before dinner 80% of the time. After school activities only 2 days a week, lots of down time, family time, outdoor time - little screen time, little social drama ....and yes grades are As.

I'm not a homework fan but I do think you need to look at kids lives as a whole.


Like this comment
Posted by AltLocation
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jan 10, 2015 at 9:48 am

Sounds like a great school. They should put it at the old Roth Building at 300 Homer Ave. That building is just sitting and rotting.


4 people like this
Posted by Mom
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jan 10, 2015 at 10:08 am

Homework loads are teacher-dependent. We had some rough years in 6th and 7th for different children of mine, while their friends with different teachers glided through with no stress. If your child has some rigorous teachers, this can happen. I decided to tell them to not worry about top grades because middle school grades don't count towards college. When they innately want to earn top grades, this was not so easy, but having a year or two off from academic stress allowed them to approach Paly without being burnt-out on academics.

As far as the school in this article, they are probably also targeting parents who work in downtown Palo Alto but live elsewhere, much like Challenger and Stratford.


5 people like this
Posted by Denise
a resident of Nixon School
on Jan 10, 2015 at 12:42 pm

Not sure who would want to miss out on the fantastic Palo Alto Schools education. Those schools are really the BEST and they focus on social emotional learning in addition to academics which is really the key to success. On the other hand, it is always nice to have an alternative but just wonder what kind of parent would want to send their kid here. Maybe it is someone who just has money to burn and wants their child to be "special.". In that case, they should read Chapter 2 of Malcolm Gladwell's book David and Goliath.


2 people like this
Posted by Parent
a resident of JLS Middle School
on Jan 11, 2015 at 2:02 pm

"I'm not a homework fan but I do think you need to look at kids lives as a whole."

That's exactly it. I don't think the school should be looking at my kid's life as a whole, nor do I think it should be up to YOU or anyone else, the schools should be teaching my child during the school day, and letting US prioritize our time after school.

We don't even let our kid have a cell phone or tablet or personal computer. It is not for you to judge what I or anyone else's kids do with their after-school time, unless you think your opinion should take priority. In which case, we have a boundaries issue that desperately needs to be worked out.

Just because your experience works out one way, does not mean others have it exactly the same. I don't think I should have to give over the limited time we have after school to other people's discretion or judgment, because we fail to set reasonable boundaries on school time.

See the previous discussion on this issue: Web Link

I like the idea of this school because it is far more respectful of kids abilities, time, and autonomy. But it won't help us because we start HS next year.

In fact, I am making a direct appeal to the founders: I am with a group of a few dozen parents who want to innovate by next year in PAUSD. A hybrid. It's really possible, but we need some (far more limited) targeted resources, and it won't happen if we wait on the district. It would make it possible for the graduates of this program to go on to a larger high school and still have a more autonomous, creative experience, and be a part of an innovative community of learners. Will you contact me?


2 people like this
Posted by A Scot
a resident of Professorville
on Jan 11, 2015 at 5:32 pm

Soon, Bay Area education will be like Scotland's system: Excellent private schools for the wealthy; sub-standard cash-starved public schools for everyone else.

Tough luck if you are very bright but not very wealthy.


Like this comment
Posted by Parent
a resident of JLS Middle School
on Jan 12, 2015 at 12:41 am

It's already tough luck in this system at the high school level if you are bright and creative and not very wealthy. Some of us would like to change that.


Like this comment
Posted by Parent
a resident of JLS Middle School
on Jan 12, 2015 at 12:44 am

Denise,
I totally agreed with you during elementary school. We had a really different experience in middle school, so different I would not have believed it. i still think the teaching staff is great, but the experience overall has been a real nightmare. It's turned me into a voucher proponent, wish I could just leave the system ... with the tax money.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

He said – she said – who is lying? Justice Brett Kavanaugh or PA resident Christine Ford
By Diana Diamond | 71 comments | 4,503 views

Global Warming Diet
By Laura Stec | 6 comments | 1,392 views

Couples: "Taming Your Gremlin" by Richard Carson
By Chandrama Anderson | 0 comments | 1,317 views

Preparing for kindergarten
By Cheryl Bac | 1 comment | 752 views

Let's Talk Internships
By John Raftrey and Lori McCormick | 0 comments | 554 views

 

Race is tomorrow!

​On Friday, September 21, join us at the Palo Alto Baylands for a 5K walk, 5K run, 10K run, or—for the first time—half marathon! All proceeds benefit local nonprofits serving children and families.

Learn More